An Old Man's Guide to Painting a Corvette - Page 2 - Corvette Forum : DigitalCorvettes.com Corvette Forums
 
 
Go Back   Corvette Forum : DigitalCorvettes.com Corvette Forums > C3 Corvette Forums > C3 Corvette
Register Forums Garage Garage Mark Forums Read Auto EscrowInsurance Advertise

Notices

C3 Corvette
C3 Corvette General | Technical | Performance | Aftermarket | Discussions

Other sections:
Corvettes Classifieds
Corvette Detailing & Car Care
Corvette Audio/Video/Radar
General Automotive/Shop/Tools
Corvette Performance Driving/Racing

( Sponsored by: Zip Corvette Parts )

Shops/Tuners
Custom Image Corvettes
A&A Corvette
Corvette tuner

Interior
Corvette aftermarket products

Insurance



Parts & Products
Race Ramps
Edelbrock
ATI/Procharger
Corvetteguys.com
Melrose Motorsports
Parts Taxi
Airaid
Pfadt Racing
Madvette Motorsports
Hi-tech Custom Concepts
Corvette Garage
Corvette Parts and Accessories
Corvette Car Care Products
Corvette HID

Tracks/Schools
Bob Bondurant School of High Performance Driving
Corvette driving school

Wheels/Tires
Cray Wheels

Services
BADWERKS.com
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-15-2018, 11:15 PM   #16
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Removing Filler

To much heat will damage the glass, even start a fire if hot enough. Keep the gun about 3" away from the surface and work it back and forth. The heat will soften the filler and the glass, but the filler will soften much faster than the glass.

Work the hot air from the heat gun directly on the filler, heat a small area moving the gun constantly. This won't take very long, maybe 10 seconds. Use the wire brush on the hot filler to brush it away until you see color change to the color of the glass, move to the next area. As you work along you can get filler out of deep scratches, groves, etc... by working the brush edges and heat to that specific area.

Constantly move the heat gun to direct the air around your work, don't hold it in one place for more than a couple seconds.

Tips:

You don't have to remove every little bit of filler color as these areas will be prepped for some type of repair during the project.

Start with an area about the size of a baseball, add a little heat, brush, add a little more heat, brush, very soon you will know by experience how much heat is needed to remove the filler without damaging the glass.

My results in photo below.....
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Filler Removed.jpg
Views:	188
Size:	51.5 KB
ID:	23538  
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-26-2018, 07:51 PM   #17
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Completing the Stripping

Removed the paint from the door jams, t-top jams, headlight bezels and front valence. The mirrors were also removed during this step. There is such a thing as having paint remover bleed from under seams if it's not completely removed. The lacquer thinner does a great job of killing the active ingredients but better safe than having new paint bubble up. I also gave the whole car a wipe down with mineral spirits as mentioned in the paint remover application instructions.


A question via a local follower: What grade of steel wool? I use number 1 steel wool, it's more durable than the finer grades and still fine enough not to gouge the surfaces.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Stripping Completed 3.jpg
Views:	114
Size:	67.9 KB
ID:	23554  
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to 7TRoadster For This Useful Post:
The Torch (10-27-2018)
Old 10-27-2018, 08:15 PM   #18
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Body Evaluation

A video of the completed exterior stripping here:

Stripping the car with out further damage to the glass enables a certain amount of forensics that can be deciphered. What happened isn't overly important in the overall painting work but it can give you some clues on where to look for further damage. Same color/shade of glass on the hood surround and fenders but different from rest of the car suggests impact damage and glass replacement. Note they are a darker shade than the hood and doors. As a result of this knowledge, a thorough inspection of the inner fender seams, cowl bonding strips and front headlight support looking for poor repairs, cracks or fitment issues that impact the overall fit of the body. Foundation type issues such as these need to be addressed before fitting the body can begin. A flashlight and mirror are essential tools.

After stripping the thick layers of paint the poor fit of the bumper covers is apparent, these have been removed for replacement. Door hinges on the passenger side are sagging and will be repaired with new pins and bushings. The drivers side lower rear quarter panel was damaged and repaired by adding filler over cracked/split fiberglass. I've marked the cracks with a sharpie for visibility. The front of the car has been hit, the front surround replaced and the hood repaired with a sag in the middle. The body seams have been overlaid with a couple of layers of glass, edges ground with a grinder, filler was then added to both sides of the seam to fill the grinder marks and smooth out the raised seams.

A key thing to remember is that your paint work is a direct reflection of work on the foundation, body fit, panel flatness and substrate disciplines. You can have the flattest & smoothest panel on the planet and it will still look crappy if the paint has fish eyes in it, doors don't align, one body mount has sagged or isn't tight, fender is attached improperly, etc. Make sure the frame attachments, birdcage and body core are solid before moving on to body repair, fitting doors, adjusting bumpers and other bolt on parts. I'm sure you get the point, a solid foundation is necessary, don't skip these steps.

I've inspected the front surround and it looks pretty good, bonding is solid, no cracks or gaps, fit is close enough to work with (+/- 1/16"). Decisions are needed on the best way to repair the rear quarter and on replacement bumpers.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Stripping Completed.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	61.9 KB
ID:	23558  
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2018, 06:59 AM   #19
slofut
DC Crew
 
slofut's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,831
Member #119762
Member since: Sep 2012
Location: Home of grits and gnats, Moultrie, Ga.

My Corvette(s)
1971 base conv. GTO LS1, T56.

Thanks: 413
Thanked 126 Times in 117 Posts
This is a great site for automotive paint and materials. Lots of corvette experience here, and tons of general paint discussion and troubleshooting. They're in Atlanta, I just ordered their epoxy and Universal clear. Great 7 days tech support too!
But for sure, put epoxy primer on the car first! Then bodywork on top of that.

http://www.spiuserforum.com/index.ph...s-plastics.11/
slofut is offline   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to slofut For This Useful Post:
7TRoadster (10-30-2018), Pklees (12-20-2018)
Old 10-30-2018, 08:46 PM   #20
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Important Concepts

Before we go any further, here are some important concepts/disciplines that need to be kept in the forefront of your paint work.


Adhesion: (as applied to painting) The ability of spray on chemicals to stick to a given surface.
In this case primers, filler, paint, etc...... In order for paint to stay on reliably, each sub layer has to stick/adhere to the one below it. There are two types of adhesion, mechanical and chemical.

Mechanical adhesion is provided by the sanding scratches you apply to the surface when sanding/blocking the surface. These very small scratches create random cuts in the surface with rough groves, the primer/paint will flow into these and when dry form a mechanical bond. It's important to sand between coats of primer to maintain the mechanical adhesion.

Chemical adhesion is accomplished when two layers can be chemically bonded together. For instance: base coat color, can have a chemical bond with clear if the clear is sprayed within 24 hours of base coat application. Times vary by product brand but the information is usually available on the paint can or on the product application sheets available (usually free) at the paint store.


Substrate: Applied layers of products up to the application of paint is the substrate.
There is a reverence and discipline that need to be kept with respect to substrate. Your substrate starts the minute bare glass is exposed, keep it clean.

From this point on oil, gas, grease, spray lubricants, silicone lubricants, hand lotions and any foreign chemical substance is your enemy. Even oil from your hands can cause substrate issues. How you ask? Fillers & primers are porous and will absorb them, it's very hard to remove them completely. In some cases, I've had to remove the problem area of all substrates and start all over. I've seen wd40 mist/fumes float across the room and ruin the following paint application. I can't stress this enough, friends who come over to check out your work always seem to want to see with their hands. They just can't help it, they have to feel how smooth the primer is........ This is NOT OK.... I keep a used sanding block available to slap some sanding dust in my hands to absorb the oils before touching the substrate. Once you start sanding the dust sticks to your hands and keeps oils dried up. If your friends want to touch, slap their hands with it too. I've startled more than a few by yelling "DON'T TOUCH THAT" in an aggressive tone.

It's very risky to combine mechanical and paint work. An engine change while the car is in primer is very risky. Kid with a chocolate bar, oh no, No, NO!......... Don't even think of lubing the door, hood or top hinges with any kind of spray. There seem to be an endless source of these contaminates, keep the discipline. Lacquer thinner can work to clean bare glass but often will remove primers.

These foreign substances impact adhesion, paint will not stick to oils and other substances, if you spray primer over it, it will absorb up into that layer too. The paint may even go on ok, but the hot/cold cycle of shrink/expand will soon separate the layers causing a bubble under the paint. Silicone is the worst as it causes the paint to repel away from it like the same end of two magnets. This leaves a paint void, usually a small circle (fisheye) in the paint. These are not often visible in the primer, usually showing the first time when paint is applied. They make fisheye removers but the ones I've tried don't work very well. It's much better to keep the discipline of substrate cleanliness. Washing bare glass with dish soap and water then letting it dry completely before the first coat of primer is a must.

Keeping the substrate pristine isn't as easy as it sounds. Try to limit the time of exposure by moving forward with the work at every opportunity. If it's got to sit for awhile put a car cover on it and don't store anything on top of it.
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-31-2018, 02:44 AM   #21
KennyGS
DC Crew
 
KennyGS's Avatar
 
Posts: 6,019
Member #105698
Member since: May 2010
Location: PA

My Corvette(s)
2010 Grand Sport

Thanks: 513
Thanked 429 Times in 355 Posts
Great thread!
KennyGS is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to KennyGS For This Useful Post:
7TRoadster (10-31-2018)
Old 10-31-2018, 08:48 PM   #22
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Decisions Made

I've decided to replace only the damaged part of the rear quarter panel. Found a used OE fender relatively cheap and will cut what is needed from that and install. I will straighten the hood and replace the PS door hinge pins & bushings. I have also chosen Truflex bumpers front and rear as replacements. Ordered parts, the door pins and bushings arrived first.

Supported the door on a door dolly, removed the bolts holding the door and slid it back out of the way. Removed the pins and bushings from the hinges. Installed new bushings using a 6" c-clamp to press them into place. Installed the new pins and using a body dolly to support the hinge, drove the pins in. Installed and adjusted the door and door latch pin. Adjusting takes a few tries to get it just right. The door doesn't sag and gaps are back.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Hinge bushing replacement.jpg
Views:	124
Size:	57.1 KB
ID:	23572  
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to 7TRoadster For This Useful Post:
The Torch (11-01-2018)
Old 11-02-2018, 10:19 PM   #23
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Prep for Glass Repair

I learned the basics of glass work from a book; "Corvette Body Repair Guide", by R.K. Schiro, published in two volumes by Glass-Ra in 1981. It provided the basics I needed to feel comfortable giving it a try. Those basic techniques have grown with experience to the point where glass work is as routine as washing my car. I have picked up a few tricks over the years and will try to pass those along. Those that haven't done it can gain understanding by giving it a try. Perhaps first attempts should be done on some broken test panels. It is actually pretty easy to do, not withstanding the messy resin and itchy dust.

Tools your gonna need: You'll need a way to cut the fiberglass, I use a 3" cut off wheel but a body saw or even a hack saw blade will work. A 4" sanding disk (60 grit) works great for prepping the glass. Dust mask or respirator, rubber gloves, shop shades in safety equipment, a cheap paint brush with about half the bristles cut away, sanding block, putty knife, heat gun, a few clamps to hold parts in position as resin dries, scissors, mixing container and mixing stick.

Materials: Resin and hardener, fiberglass mat (not cloth), seam adhesive, course grit sandpaper and lacquer thinner (for cleanup).
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Glassing Materials.jpg
Views:	110
Size:	74.9 KB
ID:	23574  
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2018, 10:13 AM   #24
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Repairing the Glass

When the fender panel arrived, the paint was stripped off. Matched the panel to the damaged area establishing cut line locations. Cut lines were marked with a straight edge on the replacement panel. Cut the replacement panel from the fender with 3" cut off wheel. Fitted the panel up against the body and marked a match line along it's edge. Marked another line parallel to this one about an eighth inch away on the replacement panel side of the match line. This is the body cut line, cut the broken panel from the body along the cut line. Be mindful of what is behind the panel you may only be able to cut to the depth of the panel as needed in this instance at the splash shield. Fitting up a body panel before cutting doesn't always fit exactly, things like light sockets and rolled edges get in the way. The eighth inch extra provides insurance against cutting to much glass from the body. It's easy to sand or file more off as the new panel is fitted, not so easy to have to fill a larger gap between panels.

Because this is a lower rear quarter replacement the splash shield also has to be separated from the panel without damaging the splash shield. This is where the heat gun and putty knife are used to separate the seam. Seam separation is also not hard, but you have to be patient. Heat softens the seam sealer, I work along the edges using the corner of the putty knife until the slag is separated from the edges of the panel bond. Then I work the putty knife between the panels starting in this case at the bottom, then switch the heat gun to the outside of the panel. The thickness of the putty knife provides separation pressure, the heat gun worked up and down along the seam will release the seam. Move the putty knife up and repeat until the panel is separated. Resist the urge to pry with the knife, it's ok to pry with light pressure but if you pry to hard it can pull glass off the part your trying to save. To help combat this heat the side that will be removed, that way if glass is removed it's off the panel being replaced.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Body Panel Removed.jpg
Views:	126
Size:	51.2 KB
ID:	23576  

Last edited by 7TRoadster; 11-05-2018 at 10:15 AM. Reason: Add photo
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2018, 06:40 AM   #25
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Repairing the Glass

Next fit the panel to the body, the metal bumper retainer was used to locate the rear holes properly. Then remove glass along the cut line, removing high spots and matching edges until the panel fits the cut out. Once fit, clamp it into place. Grind the edges back on both pieces on both sides, creating a dished area across the cut line on both sides that totals about 2" wide. (See Illustration in post 26) This needs to be done on the inside and outside, plus needs to be down past the gel coat for about 3/4". Once the trough is cut, remove the panel and remove about 1/32" of glass from the matching edges of both halves to leave about a 1/16"-1/8" gap. Double check the fit and gaps, sanded the splash shield and inner panel area in preparation for attachment with new seam adhesive. Tested the fit again and verify where best to install the clamps after glass and resin are applied.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Panel Prep Interior.jpg
Views:	118
Size:	63.6 KB
ID:	23580  

Last edited by 7TRoadster; 04-13-2019 at 08:43 AM.
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2018, 06:41 AM   #26
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Repairing the Glass

Prep for install: Cut some 1" x 2" strips from the fiberglass mat. You will need enough to cover the length of the cut line in 1" increments. Cut two 2" wide strips the length of the cut lines. You may need several lengths of these depending on how your repair line runs. Six of them were needed for this car, one for each side of the horizontal line, one on each side of the diagonal line for each side of the splash guard. Then you will need some mat cut into small pieces, you can cut 3/16" wide by about 2" long with scissors or run some mat through a paper shredder. There is a pile of this in the materials photo. This will be mixed with resin to make a slurry to fill in voids. Clean the application areas up, blow off the dust and put some plastic or papers on the floor under the work area.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Fiberglass Repair.jpg
Views:	123
Size:	32.5 KB
ID:	23582  
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2018, 06:47 AM   #27
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Repairing the Glass

Mix resin in small batches, you only have 10-12 minutes of working time if mixed correctly, less if you put to much hardener in the mix. So mix up a small (3-6 tablespoons) batch of resin and get started. Apply resin to the 1" trough on both sides of the replacement panel only. Using the 1" wide strips, place one on the outside, then one on the inside, alternating for the length of the cut line. Using the short brush, stipple more resin onto just the end of the mat that is on the panel. Continue until the white of the mat turns clear (fully soaked in resin). Now bend the 1" strips, the ones on the outside bend in, the ones on the inside bend out. You should end up with the white ends of the mat bent opposite their attaching side. They don't have to be bent far, just enough to work the piece into place with the free ends of the 1" strips on opposite sides of the cut line from the ends you have resin on. (See illustration post #26) By this time the resin will be getting thicker and harder to work. Discard what you have left and mix up a quick batch of seam sealer. Apply that to the panel and slip the panel up and work it into place. Carefully align and clamp the repair into place. Alignment is key because after it's clamped it won't be moved again.

Now mix up a new batch of resin and stipple the white ends of the strips to the inside and outside of the body panel. These need to be fully soaked with resin. Now add the 2" strip to the inside of the cut line, it will stick to the strips as you lay it into place. Stipple that down completely until the resin is fully soaked. Next add some of the shredded mat to the resin and when saturated use the end of the brush to pick it up out of the resin and push it into the outside of the cut line. What you need to do here is keep adding the shredded mix until all bubbles are gone and the mix is even with the panel depth at the center. This may take a couple batches of resin, but don't worry, the resin will form a chemical bond with the earlier applied resin for several hours.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Repair Inside.jpg
Views:	117
Size:	61.8 KB
ID:	23584  

Last edited by 7TRoadster; 04-13-2019 at 08:47 AM.
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2018, 06:53 AM   #28
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Repairing the Glass

When done with the shredded mix, apply the 2" wide strip on the outside and stipple it down with resin. If you see any obvious low spots add mat and resin as needed. It will take a few applications to understand how much resin is needed without putting so much on that it creates the drips running down the panel or sags in the glass/resin mix. Better to much than to little so just splash a rag with lacquer thinner and wipe them off. If you get a sag in the mat, use the bristle end of the brush on the opposite side of the sag to push the mat back into place and then stipple the air bubbles out. (See the illustration post # 26).

Keep moving along the panel adding glass and resin in the steps above. Once all the glass is on, clean the brush and mixing container with lacquer thinner and let the resin cure for 24 hours. Remove the clamps, there are usually low spots or voids where they were clamped, dress these small areas with the grinding disc and using the shredded resin glass them up to the level of the rest of the glass. (Photo) Again let it cure 24 hours.

Tip: Fiberglass dust and particles are itchy. Cut a 3" x 5" piece of fine (gray) scotch cloth and rub soap into it. Scrub aggressively, this does a great job of removing the fine glass shards embedded in your skin that cause the itching.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Clamp holes filled.jpg
Views:	147
Size:	53.8 KB
ID:	23586  

Last edited by 7TRoadster; 11-06-2018 at 07:04 AM. Reason: text edit
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-08-2018, 09:01 PM   #29
7TRoadster
DC Crew
 
7TRoadster's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,767
Member #106320
Member since: May 2010
Location: Kennewick, WA

My Corvette(s)
1970 Roadster, Mast Motorsports LS7, TKO 600, SS Frame, C4 suspension

Thanks: 43
Thanked 159 Times in 143 Posts
Sand the Glass to Contour

Use the sanding block and course paper (100 grit) to smooth the top off the glass repair. When you get the high spots down to not quite flat, switch to 220 grit for flattening and blending the edges. The 11" block is what I used to do this work, I know it's faster to use a sander but my experience is that sanders eat into the glass quickly and leave it wavy so I choose to use blocks to keep it flat. The curved areas were done with a curved block, more on this as we move through the application and blocking of primers.

What is a contour anyway? Think of a contour as a blending of flat and curve, a transition from hard edge to soft roll, the overall body shape or outline blended together with aesthetic curves. You ever seen a concept car being shaped in clay? The artist will move and shape the contours of the car until it meets their overall vision. Example here:
Perfect contours can be seen in the reflections of a perfect paint job, one endless and unbroken line of reflection from one end of the car to the other. This is tough concept to visualize, but one you have to develop an eye for if you're going for show quality paint.

Our basic goal is to blend flats and curves together in such a way as to transition seamlessly. The eye should not be able to tell where flatness ends and curving starts. This is not easy with the compound curves, reverse curves and seams of a Corvette body. A number of sanding blocks are needed to get contours correct with smooth flowing curves and flat panels.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Rear Qtr Repair Done.jpg
Views:	146
Size:	53.5 KB
ID:	23596  
7TRoadster is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-10-2018, 03:13 AM   #30
KennyGS
DC Crew
 
KennyGS's Avatar
 
Posts: 6,019
Member #105698
Member since: May 2010
Location: PA

My Corvette(s)
2010 Grand Sport

Thanks: 513
Thanked 429 Times in 355 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7TRoadster View Post
Our basic goal is to blend flats and curves together in such a way as to transition seamlessly. The eye should not be able to tell where flatness ends and curving starts. This is not easy with the compound curves, reverse curves and seams of a Corvette body. A number of sanding blocks are needed to get contours correct with smooth flowing curves and flat panels.
Looks like you did exactly that. Turned out great!

I like how the guy in the video, modelling the BMW in clay, uses tape to set up (and keep track) where the transitions of contours are occurring/meeting. Pretty cool!
KennyGS is online now   Reply w/quote Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to KennyGS For This Useful Post:
7TRoadster (11-10-2018)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Corvette Forum : DigitalCorvettes.com Corvette Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (12 CHARACTERS MAXIMUM), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
City / State / Country?
Where you live
What kind of Corvette(s) do you own?
This field is not required.
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.2

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:26 AM.




Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
2003-2011, DigitalCorvettes.com - All Rights Reserved