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Old 11-11-2018, 02:42 AM   #31
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Avoid paint strippers on fiberglass. Use a razor blade.
Fiberglass will absorb the chemicals and is difficult to remove.

Later after the car is painted and it is in the sun the chemicals may come to the surface and ruin the paint

Just my 2 cents

The boat in my avatar was done with razor blades
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Old 11-12-2018, 12:20 AM   #32
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Refitting the Hood

In this case the hood had two low spots at about the center line of the front suspension. Half inch down on drivers side, about a quarter inch down on passenger side (visible in the body evaluation movie above). The front and two rear corners matched pretty close. A half inch is to thick to make up with additional glass so this hood had to be re-contoured to match the body. In order to do this the support section has to be removed from the skin. Both pieces will be reused so careful separation is needed using a heat gun and panel separation tools. The panel knife is a $5 paint scraper, it's a little stiffer than a putty knife and has a sharpened edge.

The tools needed are the heat gun, panel knife, putty knife, mason's trowel (modified), some small hardwood wedges, drill with 1/8" bit, sheet metal screws, a stack of clamps, sand paper and a nut driver. Materials are seam sealer, fiberglass mat, fiberglass resin, stir sticks and lacquer thinner. The mason's trowel is modified by rounding the corners and tapering the edges both top and bottom.
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Old 11-12-2018, 09:23 AM   #33
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Refitting the Hood (2)

Remove the hood and place it upside down on a work bench, fender dolly or whatever you have to work on. Keep your substrate in mind here, don't put it upside down on any surface with oil or other contaminates.

As above, remove the slag from the edges first, the outside edge is narrow, use the edge of the knife or a small screwdriver to clean the adhesive out the groove. Work along the inside edges using the heat gun work the knife between the panel and support. Then work the knife along the bond seam using the heat to soften the adhesive between the panels. In this case the thickness of the putty knife doesn't supply enough separation pressure to allow the support to separate using just heat. So as soon as a few inches is separated a wedge gets inserted to add pressure along the seam. Don't pound the wedge in or anything, you only need moderate pressure about as far as you can push in with your hand is fine. The heat gun now worked up and down along the seam will release the seam. Move the wedges as you work along, separate the inner seam around the front to the point in back where the inside bonding seams stop at the edge of the raised part of the hood.

Now use the mason's trowel and slide it under the inner seam and use it to start the separation of the outer seam. Once you have about 6" separated you should be able to get the knife in from the outside edge. Once about 16" or so is done the wedges can be used and off you go separating the outside bonding strip from the rear of the hood latch area around the front to rear of hood latch area on the other side. The rear is a little tricky as it has more bonding in areas around the cowl vent and side to side behind the hood latch areas. Pick one side or the other and place wedges as close as you can to the rearmost edges of the separations. One on the outside and one inside. Heat the panel matched section behind the hood latch area, use the trowel here to aid separation as far as it will reach. Once separated continue down the outside edge until you reach the corner. Then work across the back toward the center, the bonding here isn't as strong as what you have done so far because it's only about a quarter inch of the edge that is bonded. When you get a couple of inches from the edge of the center raised portion stop.

The support panel around the cowl vent area is bonded all the way around weather you have a cowl vent or not. Leave the wedges in place and heat the side of the vent and the front and rear strips about half way down. This may take a bit as it is a larger area to heat up. Keep applying light pressure until it separates, once it does stop and start on the other side at behind the hood latch area and separate the same way. Make sure the cowl vent area is fully separated before lifting the hood support surround as this area is easy to crack/brake.

With the parts separated, use the heat gun and panel knife to remove the old bonding adhesive off both parts. Allot of elbow grease here, just keep heating and moving along. Once all of the old seam adhesive is off of both panels, a rag and some lacquer thinner should remove any residue. If you have any fiberglass mat showing or split the fiberglass, mix up a very small batch of resin and use some slurry mix to fill in around the exposed mat or repair the split. Clamp as necessary and let it cure 24 hours. Sand any repairs flat using course (100 grit) paper, sand all the matching surfaces with 220 grit to prep it for new seam adhesive.

At this point the hood support surround and hood panel are separated, old seam adhesive removed and surfaces repaired and prepped for new adhesive. Neither the hood surround or the hood panel on this car had any GM part numbers embossed into the glass. I believe this to be an aftermarket hood, as we all know some are not the best quality and fitting any of them is normally a challenge. Hopefully these posts will show you one way they can be fixed.
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:15 PM   #34
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Refitting the Hood (3)

Install the hood surround back in the car, bolt up the hinges and center the support surround as close as you can. You want the outside edges of the support to be roughly an eighth inch below the edge of the body hood surround. I measured the drip rail and allowing for the thickness of the glass made 2 rubber blocks to hold the support surround up to proper height on the edges where it was low. This of course raised the back to several inches above the rear fender edge. I used my heat gun to heat the glass at the spot where the curve needed to be changed. It takes a bit of heat so work it slow, spread the heat out over distance of the curve you want modify. You can tell it's changing when the rear of the support surround sags into place. Let it cool in place.
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Old 11-13-2018, 08:23 PM   #35
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Refitting the Hood (4)

This also changed the relationship to the front edge which was now lower than needed. Use two paint stir sticks and some masking tape to hold the front edge in place and applied heat to the front corners. Once the stress went off the sticks, let it cool in place. After re-curving the sides and front the support surround was low along the back edges. I reused the rubber blocks here to raise the edge roughly one quarter inch for about a twelve inch section just forward of the passenger side hood latch. Did the same on the other side to but only for about a six inch area. One of the corners in the back was a little high so grabbed it with some channel locks and held light pressure on it as the area about 4 inches away was heated and it bent it down.
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:47 PM   #36
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Refitting the Hood (5)

Once the lower surround is contoured to match the body surround at about an eighth inch lower, lay the hood panel on there and carefully align the gaps equal on all sides. Cut some stir sticks and use them as spacers. Check the fit and height, use masking tape to mark high or low spots so you can adjust the support surround. It will take several tries, removing the skin, adjusting the surround, installing and refitting the skin. Use the heat and adjust the support until all of a sudden it fits and it fits pretty darn well. Now is the time for careful alignment. Get the gaps matching all the way around the hood panel. Clamp the back corners and check gaps again. Hold the hood in place at the front and drill a eighth inch hole through the outer mating surfaces at the point of the hood. Drive a screw into the hole to hold both pieces. Checking gaps again drill holes and drives screws at the front corners and rear corners. Remove the clamps.

Here is a movie of the fitted hood, you'll notice the holding screws in place and much improved contours.

https://youtu.be/tzXPJXo_ptc
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Old 11-15-2018, 10:47 AM   #37
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Here's a question for you. What about a car that was stripped and then stored for years, hand oils and dust/dirt on it? Can you spray a good primer to seal it?
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Old 11-15-2018, 11:43 AM   #38
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Hard to say how much it will clean up, depends on the environment. Give it a couple of good baths with dish soap and water. Allow it to dry in between. Then wipe it down with wax and grease remover. Rub on with wet rag and wipe off with shop towels before it dries. Go over the whole car, twice would be a good idea. Once that is done wipe down again with lacquer thinner, apply/remove as wax & grease remover and let it dry. Scuff all surfaces for good mechanical adhesion, blow clean with clean air and spray on a catalyzed primer.

I'll add a photo of the wax & grease remover soon.
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Old 11-15-2018, 12:08 PM   #39
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I haven't had time to get back to this car in years, I was planning on pulling it out of storage this summer but that never happened and now we're into snow season so it won't be until next summer most likely I get to it. I might have to cut back working on others cars and get back to my own! you know the story of the cobbler with no shoes.
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Old 11-16-2018, 07:22 PM   #40
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Refitting the Hood (6)

I understand totally, have two of my own that need attention.


Unbolt the hood hinges and remove the hood, again upside down on the work surface. Use a pencil and mark the inside edge of the surround onto the hood panel. Remove the screws, separating the parts. Now it's time to reattach the hood panel and surround into one piece. This is best done with two people and both have to work quickly. Simultaneously mix up two fairly large (half pint each) batches of panel adhesive. Apply liberal amounts to all matching seams, one person working down each side. Work quickly as you need to have the pieces matched before it begins to harden. It doesn't matter which half you put the adhesive on, just do it quickly and using the screw holes align the panels and re-install the screws to hold it in place. Clamp the edges using c-clamps, vice grips, welding clamps, or whatever you have to hold the matching surfaces together and then while the adhesive is still soft clean up the edges. After it dries, mix up small batches of adhesive and fill any voids along the outside edges or under the edges of the seams. Push it under the seam edge as far as you can with the putty knife. Clean up edges while adhesive is still soft.

Flip the hood over, remove the screws, grind a small dish over each of the screw holes and patch with fiberglass slurry. Fill the dish and push it down into the hole with the stipple brush. Refill the dish just a little bit high. Let cure 24 hours, sand to contour with surrounding hood panel. Refit the hood onto the car, adjust as necessary to align gaps. This hood now fits really well regardless of origin, some light filler to square up edges and it's ready for primer.
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Old 11-17-2018, 05:00 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 7TRoadster View Post
I understand totally, have two of my own that need attention.


Unbolt the hood hinges and remove the hood, again upside down on the work surface. Use a pencil and mark the inside edge of the surround onto the hood panel. Remove the screws, separating the parts. Now it's time to reattach the hood panel and surround into one piece. This is best done with two people and both have to work quickly. Simultaneously mix up two fairly large (half pint each) batches of panel adhesive. Apply liberal amounts to all matching seams, one person working down each side. Work quickly as you need to have the pieces matched before it begins to harden. It doesn't matter which half you put the adhesive on, just do it quickly and using the screw holes align the panels and re-install the screws to hold it in place. Clamp the edges using c-clamps, vice grips, welding clamps, or whatever you have to hold the matching surfaces together and then while the adhesive is still soft clean up the edges. After it dries, mix up small batches of adhesive and fill any voids along the outside edges or under the edges of the seams. Push it under the seam edge as far as you can with the putty knife. Clean up edges while adhesive is still soft.

Flip the hood over, remove the screws, grind a small dish over each of the screw holes and patch with fiberglass slurry. Fill the dish and push it down into the hole with the stipple brush. Refill the dish just a little bit high. Let cure 24 hours, sand to contour with surrounding hood panel. Refit the hood onto the car, adjust as necessary to align gaps. This hood now fits really well regardless of origin, some light filler to square up edges and it's ready for primer.
That hood-fit looks pretty damned good! Did that take a lot of tweaking/adjusting to get it there during the installation, or was it fairly painless?
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Old 11-17-2018, 07:59 AM   #42
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Not allot after the support surround is contoured, that is the tedious part. The hood skin gets aligned and fitted, drilled and the screws position it. Final fit is a repeat of the fit before removal. I used one 1/8" spacer under the DS hinge and a 1/16" spacer under the passenger side hinge. Those were installed during the first fitting of the support surround.

I hope that answers your question.
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Old 11-17-2018, 01:15 PM   #43
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Thanks for this write-up. You are doing freat
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Old 11-18-2018, 08:41 AM   #44
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New Bumpers (Front)

The bumpers arrived in great shape. They were packed well in sturdy boxes and no damage by the shipper. Yea!!! This being my first experience with the Tru-Flex bumpers I was anxious to work with them. The finish is semi gloss black jell coat and the first impression is one of a quality product. The front was unpacked first so started with it. The instructions tell you that removal of the rubber urethane supports may be necessary and that with the fiberglass bumpers they are not required. The fact is the bumpers won't fit over them, at least not on the '78 I'm working on. The heavy rubber support behind the license plate was removed, this left the plastic egg crate support. The bumper wouldn't fit over that either, it was hitting the bottom most extensions and at the top inner corner of the grille opening. I trimmed of the bottom 1.5" or so and tapered the edges at the grille opening corners. It then fit over the crate support and I was able to test fit the bumper.

It actually fit pretty well, I clamped it into place, marked the holes, removed the bumper and drilled the mounting holes with a 1/4" drill bit. The marks matched pretty close to the indents cast into the bumper. The original metal strips of studs were reused and I installed them into the drilled holes. Some fitting (elongating holes) was needed here to get the outside edge strips into place. I held off on installing the metal valence support on the bottom until the bumper could be fitted. Installed the bumper and got the studs through the holes in the body on the first try. That never happens, I've concluded this is because the new bumper is fiberglass and doesn't flex as the urethane does. Loosely install the nuts on all the studs.

Starting with the two center nuts, match the bumper contour to the car and tighten the nuts. Working outward and alternating side to side match contours and tighten nuts to secure the bumper. In a couple places I used a pry bar to hold the bumper up a little, on the sides clamps helped to hold them flush with the body while I tightened the nuts. With the bumper secured I centered the lower valence support and marked holes for the pop rivets and bolts. The bolt holes matched the slot indents in the bumper cover exactly. Bolt holes were drilled with 5/16" bit, rivet holes a 3/16" bit. With the holes drilled an attempt to install was rejected by two bolts sticking down from the center bumper support. I cut the protruding threads off at the nut and then it fit under the bumper cover where it was riveted into place. Test fit the valence to verify bolt hole locations.

Hoo hew, bumper is on, bolted up and fitted. Using a block and 100 grit paper I sanded down the matching edges that protruded beyond the body. The worst were on the sides, sticking out beyond the body about 1/8". I sanded half off the bumper and decided to fill the remaining 1/16" on the body to match up the contours. There are a few low spots along the top edges of the bumper that need to be filled but overall a good fit. Because these are fiberglass it's acceptable to add filler as you would finish any other panel. When done I can visualize these bumper contours matching the body perfectly.

The video shows the bumper bolted up with edges blocked down. No filler added at this point.

https://youtu.be/mm_bfX_sj9k
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Old 11-18-2018, 09:10 AM   #45
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New Bumpers (Rear)

The rear bumper was about the same as the front. The instructions again tell you that removal of the rubber urethane supports may be necessary and that with the fiberglass bumpers they are not required. They also tell you that the tail light support brackets must be removed or cracking is likely to occur. The rear has rubberized supports, one on each side of the license plate and one in each corner. The license plate supports were removed completely. For the corner supports I removed only the rubber facing. The test fit wouldn't quite fit up, it was hitting the bottom edges of the corner supports. Rather than just removing them a 1/2" wedge was cut off the bottom of both. This allowed the clearance needed in the corners. The next test fit still had some interference and removing the rubber strip on the horizontal support solved that.

It actually fit pretty well, I clamped it into place, marked the holes, removed the bumper and drilled the mounting holes with a 1/4" drill bit. The marks matched pretty close to the indents cast into the bumper but not as good as the front. The original U shaped metal strips were reused and I installed them over the drilled holes and aligned them. Again some fitting (elongating holes) was needed here to get the outside edge strips into place. This was tough, the steel stud strips had to be reshaped to fit into the space. Installing the bumper was easy with all the removed parts. Loosely install the screws along the top and nuts on the side studs.

Starting with the two center top screws, match the bumper contour to the car and tighten the screws. Working outward and alternating side to side match contours and tighten screws to secure the bumper. The top edges could be moved by finger pressure and on the sides clamps held them flush with the body while I tightened the nuts.

Bumper is on, bolted up and fitted. Using a block and 100 grit paper I sanded down the matching edges that protruded beyond the body. Again the most challenged areas were on the sides, sticking out beyond the body about 1/8". I sanded half off the bumper and will fill the remaining 1/16" on the body to match up the contours. As in the front there are a few low spots along the edges of the bumper that need to be filled but overall a good fit.

Here is a photo of the bolted up rear bumper.
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