Corvette Forum : DigitalCorvettes.com Corvette Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,109 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
http://www.kentuckypoliticalreview.com/?p=2571

"The situation would be laughable if the consequences weren’t so tragic. While the Courier-Journal worships at the altar of diversity, casts hosannas on the Jefferson County School Board’s queen of diversity, Pat Todd, it of course ignores the consequences of this classic liberal attitude of destroying others to achieve their own vision of utopia. The school assignment plan, better known as “bussing,” has virtually ruined the public school system in Jefferson County, leaving behind a trail of destroyed lives, primarily among the black community – an Inconvenient Truth that the liberal elite choose to either hide or ignore as long as they achieve their beloved diversity.
These hypocritical liberal elite, live in exclusively white enclaves, and sit around at Jack Fry’s sipping their Napa Valley wine, toasting the great diversity in our schools while also boasting how well their children are doing at Country Day or Collegiate and what private colleges those children will attend. In the meantime, they oppose charter schools, vouchers or any other means to help kids who lack the financial resources of the elite and are trapped in failing schools where their dreams of success are shattered. And we wonder why they turn to drugs and crime!

Hypocrisy of the liberal elite has now been exposed by the new documentary, ‘Waiting For “Superman”’ by Davis Guggenheim. The merits of this scorching documentary is highlighted by one of its critics who calls it “inaccurate, inconsistent and incomplete”. And what illustrious critic made this observation? None other than the President of the American Federation of Teachers. No wonder. Waiting For “Superman” chronicles the desperation of young kids victimized by the failing schools fostered upon them by the liberal do gooders. The root cause – not hard to figure – the teachers unions. The remedy? Charter schools and ‘School Choice’. ‘Waiting For “Supermn”’ shows kids who have to enter a lottery hoping to be selected for the existing charter schools, meaning that the opportunity for success in our failing schools system is up to luck. As stated in the Wall Street Journal review: “The film’s subjects—five co-stars, really, with the charisma of eager innocence—differ in age, race and family circumstances, yet they’re all stuck in schools that may break their spirits and maybe their hearts.”

This is not a documentary by some tea party advocate. The filmmaker is none other than Davis Guggenheim who also brought us “An Inconvenient Truth”. Guggenheim, a confirmed liberal admitted that his investigation into the subject of education was inspired by the reality of his own family. When checking the test scores of his neighborhood school in Venice, California he concluded that his support of public education did not matter as much to him as the fear of sending his own kids to a failing school. “And so, every morning, betraying the ideals I thought I lived by, I drive past three public schools as I take my kids to a private school.” Thus, he did something about it. The left and their allies – the teachers unions – now stand exposed for what they are – and emperor with no clothes."
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,109 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marshall-fine/huffpost-review-iwaiting_b_737752.html


Our priorities are so screwed up in this country that, even as Congress debates continued tax cuts for millionaires, schools and libraries go begging for funding. Teachers struggle to make ends meet and we continue to lose entire generations to the streets because the schools so poorly meet their needs.

The results of these funding shortfalls for schools and education -- and of Tea Party candidates mouthing off about how they would eliminate the Department of Education -- are amply illustrated in Davis Guggenheim's Waiting for 'Superman,' a provocative documentary that shows in both broad strokes and frightening detail how our schools continue to fail our children.

Guggenheim, the Oscar-winning director of An Inconvenient Truth, lays out in facts and figures the many ways that so-called "failure factories" perpetuate and expand the dropout rate, how entrenched teachers (thanks to unions that allow no give in their work rules) fail their students, and so on.

Guggenheim looks in at various charter schools and sees them as part of the answer -- but not the complete solution -- to the problem. As he notes, the real issue is not how to get more charter schools, but how to make public schools achieve the same kind of success that the best charter schools do. He follows several youngsters who long for a better school and are forced to participate in lotteries to win one of the scarce places in those free private schools. It's heart-breaking to watch.

He talks to a variety of educators -- including the controversial Washington, D.C., superintendent Michelle Rhee, whose efforts to prune the deadwood from the District of Columbia's dreadful public school system met only resistance from parents at the schools. Some have criticized the film for failing to offer another side to this facet of the story -- but offer no solution.

Some may see Guggenheim's viewpoint on the charter schools, on Rhee, on the state of education in general -- as simplistic, as overly broad in its tendency to tar public school systems across the country with the same brush. And, in general, his points tend to be general rather than specific.

There is no mention, for example, of the ongoing hypocrisy of a federal government that gives lip service to the value of education while under-funding education initiatives, or of spending a trillion dollars on a pointless war while cutting education funding at a time when states are in dire straits in terms of money for their schools.

Indeed, Guggenheim casts such a wide net that, even though he focuses on a handful of young children -- whose only hope is winning a lottery spot in a local charter school -- the film offers only generalities in terms of solutions, hand-wringing instead of a specific call to action.

By contrast, the much smaller, less-advertised documentary The Lottery, released in June, deals with the same issues but cuts deeper. Madeleine Sackler's film, which should be available on DVD or video-on-demand, focused on one Harlem neighborhood, in which a battle raged over a local charter school, even as the neighborhood schools were failing. It dealt with the same issues, seemed to find more specific solutions and more specific problems than Guggenheim's film.

Unfortunately, the reality is that Guggenheim's documentary -- which has received huge support from its movie company for advertising and promotion -- will still struggle to reach a wide audience. Waiting for 'Superman' seems to say that we are the only change-agents who can solve this problem -- but actually reaching that audience is an uphill struggle in a country that's more caught up in who will be the new judges on "American Idol" than what's happening in its local schools."
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,760 Posts
You want to know the real problem with our education system????


Read this...

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100822/ap_on_re_us/us_taj_mahal_schools

Our school superintendants are in a race. Not a race to make thier students better. A race to have the nicest facilities. They fool the parants who get elected to the local school boards into thinking that a new facility is what will solve all the problems, but what is realy needed are better teachers not better buildings. This new race started about 15 years ago and the article I linked to is what we have come to. This non-sense has to stop.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
31,366 Posts
You want to know the real problem with our education system????


Read this...

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100822/ap_on_re_us/us_taj_mahal_schools

Our school superintendants are in a race. Not a race to make thier students better. A race to have the nicest facilities. They fool the parants who get elected to the local school boards into thinking that a new facility is what will solve all the problems, but what is realy needed are better teachers not better buildings. This new race started about 15 years ago and the article I linked to is what we have come to. This non-sense has to stop.
That is a big part of the problem. Do we really need HS football fields with the same turf the pro's use? In Texas, HS football is huge, some of these stadiums would blow your mind.

Then we see brand new buildings popping up, when the old building could have been fixed and updated for about 1/3 the cost of the new building. All the while, property taxes are climbing and education is lacking.

But the teachers unions are also a huge problem, you can't fire the bad ones, and they are draining communities with their outrageous pay & benefits packages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,410 Posts
This is getting to be old news already.

About time the liberal media started questioning thier own agenda, especially when it comes to our kids.

machine is right. It's not about the human factor as it should be. It's about the 'bling', and it's also telling about the parents.

My wife was a teacher of special needs children for 33 years in all grades from K-8. Although it was a rewarding career for her, the biggest problem she had to overcome with some of her students was parental involvement. Too many parents think of the school system as a glorified 'babysitting service.'

It's easy to say, we need better teachers, and it would be nice. Come to think of it, we need better people in every area of society.

What's going on now with the school system is simply this... It's a government institution, it's grown to incredible proportions, the behemoth can no longer be administered successfully. It's in decline, even as we spend more and more on each student, the scores are deteriorating. Most grammer school children don't know who the vice-president is, but they all know who Justin Beiber is. They've removed the arts or watered down the curriculum. How manykids know Mozart? The school system has been washed politically clean. It has the notion of God removed from it and there is no longer any reference to the country that is supporting it during school hrs. The schol system has lost it's identity, and so have the students. So have the teachers.

Our school system has become a vast losing experiment of social reform. Why, because it's stopped doing the things for it's students that cause them to excel. No competition, they are all equal. This removes any incentive to excel. There is no longer inspiration.

The school boards don't want to blame themselves. How can they? They've put so much money into the system, it can't be thier fault. Maybe, if your educating robots.

Another thing about this film. I wouldn't be so quick to tout the director made An Inconvenient Truth, as that whole film is nothing but lies, distortions and misrepresentations from beginning to end.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,109 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
You want to know the real problem with our education system????


Read this...

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100822/ap_on_re_us/us_taj_mahal_schools

Our school superintendants are in a race. Not a race to make thier students better. A race to have the nicest facilities. They fool the parants who get elected to the local school boards into thinking that a new facility is what will solve all the problems, but what is realy needed are better teachers not better buildings. This new race started about 15 years ago and the article I linked to is what we have come to. This non-sense has to stop.

That's what happened in my area.

A large part of money spent the wrong way.
Problem is..

Many parents.........want a bigger, newer, school system with all the newest bells and whistles..

It's a prestiege thing.

Like driving an expensive SUV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
I agree with less school spending. I see it everyday. What I also see is real lack of parenting. Parents expect the schools to be the parents. Not all parents but the majority in my area seem to have taken this route. The kids in the schools reflect what they get at home. If I didn't make good grades there were consequences when I got home. And I didn't go to school that had all the bling they have now. No pizza bar for lunch. No breakfast in the morning. No excuse mechanism for why my behavior could be bad. The changes need to start at home.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top