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Well we certainly have one heck of a starting point on this build..





Nice, right? Well This car has a stated goal of being a driver. having the ability to go get lost in the hot south florida traffic. It needs to perform well, It needs to stop well, and It needs to stay cool and keep it's occupants cool. Tall order for this car so lets get started.

As we unbolt and remove the intake, we find cheesy coolant passages..



So the heads gotta come off..



And strip the passenger side of the firewall inside and out to prep for the vintage air..

 

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Discussion Starter #2
Areas of particular concern going back together are here..


And here..



It is a shame how having the ability to stop your vehicle with just one foot and on short notice used to be an option. We need to install a vacuum booster for power brakes. And We are adding a hefty amount of electrical load between the vintage air, the 12v ignition system with msd box, the cooling fan, the electric choke, the idle up solenoid. We are beyond what that poor old externally regulated alternator can keep up with.
 

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I feel sorry for those too young to remember, or who never experienced the sound, feel and smell of a '66-'67 big block Corvette when new. Modern engines have made that power plant seem like a hot running, hard to tune dog in some people's eyes. But driving or even riding in one when it was in it's prime was a thrill I will never forget. The deep throated note, the torque that would practically let you feel the frame twisting, the smell of the gasses emanating from under the hood -- if I had one of these cars, you couldn't pay me to convert it to a modern engine. I hope you get this one running like the beast it was nearly 50 years ago :thumbsup:
 

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I feel sorry for those too young to remember, or who never experienced the sound, feel and smell of a '66-'67 big block Corvette when new. Modern engines have made that power plant seem like a hot running, hard to tune dog in some people's eyes. But driving or even riding in one when it was in it's prime was a thrill I will never forget. The deep throated note, the torque that would practically let you feel the frame twisting, the smell of the gasses emanating from under the hood -- if I had one of these cars, you couldn't pay me to convert it to a modern engine. I hope you get this one running like the beast it was nearly 50 years ago :thumbsup:
No modern engine here. Just updated fuel and ignition. same 427. same sidepipes. Switched from 3x2 to single carb but it is an 800cfm thunder series edlebrock carb so it will flow as well if not a touch better. And we can apply an idle up solenoid to work with the a/c and a much better choke(electric). Tomorrow this goes on the dyno for fine tuning. I will try to get and post up a video.
 

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No modern engine here. Just updated fuel and ignition. same 427. same sidepipes. Switched from 3x2 to single carb but it is an 800cfm thunder series edlebrock carb so it will flow as well if not a touch better. And we can apply an idle up solenoid to work with the a/c and a much better choke(electric). Tomorrow this goes on the dyno for fine tuning. I will try to get and post up a video.
Blown away by your efforts, you'll get it right & it'll be a spectacular cruiser.
Looks green, my first Corvette was a green '69 SB roadster. Loved the color, IIRC it was the most popular color back then. :thumbsup:

My BB story....Year was 1969. A good school pal turned 17 & for his birthday a BBQ/party. Guy drove a '68 Avocado Green GTO w/ a Hurst 3 speed. Spoiled, I had to drive my old man's Dart Swinger 340. :laughing:

As an only kid his old man owned a very lucrative construction business. Big bucks when big bucks were big.
On a Friday went with him to his home & as we walk in breezeway, we casually glance through door to their 4 bay garages. Stopped cold. Observe chrome bumper on the frontend of a blue 1969 L-88.
Happy birthday. :WTF

Had the privilege of riding shotgun in that car half dozen times. Magnificent memories to be sure. But memory distorts time, while it was ball busting fast my LS7 would cream it.

I've the option of either piss-poor mileage by flogging it or 28 MPG, just cruising. His L-88 guzzled regardless how it was driven, clearly remember it drinking a tank of premium every 50-60 miles. Kid had a Mobile CC, when having a gas CC was a big deal, also. Nevermind a 17 yo kid.

Their L-88 also sucked a valve ruining the engine, twice. No problem for their kind of money, had it rebuilt at the now defunct Corvette Shop in Milwaukee, WI. Milwaukee Corvetters over 55 would remember the place.

'Gene' also put this car in a ditch a couple times requiring a respectable amount of bodywork. His old man was so pissed he took the car for himself & bought 'Gene' an old used Nash Metropolitan. From '68 GTO/'69 L-88 to a Metro. :laughing:

In any event, nice job. :cheers:
 

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On the subject of valves, as I was adjusting the valve train after bolting the heads back on I noticed we have solid lifters in this motor. Despite what anybody says solid lifters have no business on the street. So we might back up a touch and install some hydraulic lifters
 

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Despite what anybody says solid lifters have no business on the street. So we might back up a touch and install some hydraulic lifters
These days you may be correct but there's nothing quite like the sewing machine sound of a solid lifter engine. Back "in the day" manufacturing tolerances weren't what they are today and hydraulic lifters were notorious for "floating" and if you wanted serious RPM's solid lifters were the hot ticket. One of the best sounding engines ever was the DZ302 Chevy. It could rev to almost the levels of the new Ford flat plane crank engines. It had a solid lifter cam and mad serious power for a little mouse.

Even today we have solid roller lifters that sound real good, rev real high, won't float and the SR LT4 that I had didn't require valve adjustments hardly ever. After 30,000-40,000 miles they would be out of adjustment by a couple of thou at most. They've come a long way also and I still like the sound.

With the advent of higher ramp angles and valve speeds they may make a comeback on day. I still like them.:thumbsup:
 

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These days you may be correct but there's nothing quite like the sewing machine sound of a solid lifter engine. Back "in the day" manufacturing tolerances weren't what they are today and hydraulic lifters were notorious for "floating" and if you wanted serious RPM's solid lifters were the hot ticket. One of the best sounding engines ever was the DZ302 Chevy. It could rev to almost the levels of the new Ford flat plane crank engines. It had a solid lifter cam and mad serious power for a little mouse.

Even today we have solid roller lifters that sound real good, rev real high, won't float and the SR LT4 that I had didn't require valve adjustments hardly ever. After 30,000-40,000 miles they would be out of adjustment by a couple of thou at most. They've come a long way also and I still like the sound.

With the advent of higher ramp angles and valve speeds they may make a comeback on day. I still like them.:thumbsup:
We had a blue flame 6 in the shop a while back. beautiful white and no roof or windows. Amazing what the corvette was at it's start. But man did that in line 6 sound like exactly like a sewing machine. schika schika schika schika. it was the wierdest thing. Usually we associate a loud deep throated rumble with the name 'Corvette' Not the sound of one of the wife's tools.
 
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