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Hmmm. Got me thinking now...

I wouldn't hate that idea. I seem to remember a pretty sweet sports car that came out in the late 80s with a 2.9l tt v8 that went > 200 mph and would still hang with most top sports cars.

I'll have to make a few phone calls and see if I can get some info on this gen IV.
 

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that is today's mental wanking . lol a 3 liter v8 ... if they say 5.0l v8 or 5.7l v8 it could have being believable but just 3.0 liter come on .
 

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3 liter ohc turbo v8? if they didn't had the money for the ultra v8 for the cadillac were the hell did they find the money for an exclusive corvette engine ?......
 

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FOR THE COMPLET MENTAL WANKING LOOK AT THE COMPLEAR STORY




Anxious to attract the sort of high-performance buyers increasingly drawn to European sports cars from the likes of Porsche, Ferrari and Lamborghini, General Motors is planning some major changes for the next-generation Chevrolet Corvette – starting with a high-revving, small-displacement powertrain, that will substitute for the big V8s traditionally found under the hood of the Chevy 2-seater.

TheDetroitBureau.com has learned that GM has approved the use of a very European-style V8 that will be only slightly larger than 3 liters in displacement. The engine will be of an overhead-cam, rather than traditional overhead-valve design, using a dry sump oil system that’s particularly well-suited to high-performance road courses rather than straight-line acceleration. The engine is expected to feature a narrow 80.5 mm bore and a long stroke, more like a Ferrari or Lamborghini powertrain than the approach used for traditional Motor City metal.

The Inside Story!

A very senior GM executive also confirmed that the new engine will be turbocharged, which will help yield a broad torque curve and maximum performance under a variety of driving conditions. The engine is expected to deliver in excess of 400 horsepower, which means a specific output in the range of 125 horsepower per liter. That’s the sort of number that would help the next-gen Vette stack up well against the likes of a Porsche 911 or Lamborghini Gallardo.

The engine is likely to be extremely high-revving, perhaps climbing to a near-Formula One-class 10,000 RPMs, suggested one source involved in the project.

The revelation tracks in line with a recent comment by General Motors’ North American President Mark Reuss, who recently promised that the so-called C7 Corvette, due to market in less than two years, will be “completely different” from the very American sports cars that have come before it. Since its launch in 1953, Corvette has been governed by the philosophy, “there’s no replacement for displacement.”

While Reuss and other senior executives have declined to discuss plans for the next Corvette publicly, several well-placed sources have given TheDetroitBureau.com a good sense of what’s to come. The small V8 underscores what one of those insiders says is the desire to “target a very different sort of buyer for the next Corvette. Let’s face it, the current customer is getting old.” But without making significant changes, that source acknowledged, younger sports car fans will continue to be “conquested” by more modern, high-tech imports.

Significantly, Corvette won’t abandon its more classic powertrain roots entirely. There will be several different types of engines offered for the C7, including a more classic, big-block OHV V8 designed to appeal to traditionalists.

In fact, some of the design cues of the new car will be borrowed from early generations. There have even been rumors of the C7 going with the split window of the very collectible 1963 Corvette, though TheDetroitBureau.com has not been able to confirm that detail has been given the go.

Meanwhile, expect the interior to be much more modern than the current car’s, which GM’s global design chief Ed Welburn admits, “is a disappointment.” The styling boss, a long-time Corvette fan himself, says he is personally overseeing the development of the C7 interior and promises it will be “absolutely world-class.”

Adopting a mid-engine layout, rather than the long-running front-engine design, is considered a strong possibility, though it would be a significant engineering shift for GM. Nonetheless, sources say that wouldn’t be entirely out of line, as the Corvette has often served as the technological test bed for the maker.

GM adopted the then-radical approach of using a fiberglass body when the original 1953 Corvette was launched. The sports car has introduced plenty of other features, over the years, including the MagneRide suspension, which uses a magnetically controlled fluid to continuously vary suspension settings to match road conditions and driving behavior.

When migrating from the fifth-generation Corvette to today’s C6 model, GM trimmed weight and brought the sports car’s overall size down to something closer to that of a current Porsche 911. Anticipate further cuts in mass for the upcoming remake of Chevy’s halo car.

GM is investing $131 million in the Bowling Green, Kentucky plant that produces the Corvette to prepare for the C7 launch.

The use of the new small-displacement V8 is likely to have some knock-on effects at GM, said one of TheDetroitBureau’s sources. As with current Corvette powertrain technology, the high-tech engine will find its way into the Cadillac line-up, it appears, where it would help that brand’s V-Series evolve into a more sophisticated offering, rather than the brute-force line-up it is today.

The switch to a smaller, turbocharged V8 isn’t exclusive to GM, incidentally. Ford made the move with its big F-Series pickup for 2011, offering a downsized EcoBoost twin-turbo V6 — which delivers the same sort of towing power as the F-150′s biggest V8, while yielding significant fuel economy improvements.
 

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Wont happen.

Turbos are heavy, plus when you add the intercoolers and all of the coolant, that is a lot of weight. Weight is the last thing GM wants to add to the Corvette.

Plus GM has no 3L V8 in development.

It's all just rumors and speculation that happens whenever a new Corvette comes out. Same as the "mid-engine" crap that goes around.
 

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I love the idea of a turbo V8, but I will believe it when I read the GM press release. The extra weight required for the turbo setup can be made up for with the lighter engine components (block, pistons, con-rods etc).

The one aspect that I would miss would be the classic, big displacement engine note. A high revving 3+ liter turbo engine would sound completely different, but not necessarily in a bad way. :partyon:

The one aspect that doesn't pan out for me is how you can achieve 10,000 RPM with an engine that has an 80.5mm bore with a "long stroke" (that's a 3.17" bore in Yankee units).
 

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Wont happen.

Turbos are heavy, plus when you add the intercoolers and all of the coolant, that is a lot of weight. Weight is the last thing GM wants to add to the Corvette.

Plus GM has no 3L V8 in development.

It's all just rumors and speculation that happens whenever a new Corvette comes out. Same as the "mid-engine" crap that goes around.
Plus engine bay space.

An OHC V8 will not be smaller than the current cam in the valley engines. and then you will have to add the turbos, intercoolers and their plumbing.

It is true an engine that turns 10 grand sounds cool but in order to do that you sacrifice low end torque and drive-ability. Something that neither bench racers nor magazine testers consider when comparing performance cars.
 

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That would be interesting, though will they go that far in order to try to boost sales in Europe?.

The Corvette's biggest market is the US and I wonder if this will risk its US market standing or not. I know that there are some people who will refuse to buy it if it had such a engine (or just opt not to have that engine option). Though a 3.0L (or slightly bigger as the article says) that may produce 125BHP/L and rev to 10,000 rpms. Here is where I think this starts to fall flat on its face, if the engine can rev that high then turbos not needed.

Lets say the engine peaks horsepower at 9,000rpms, then all it needs to make at that rpm is 233ft-lbs of torque. You would be able to pull that off in a 3.2L engine pretty easily IMO. Consider GMs 3.0L V-6 in the CTS produces around 223ft-lbs and this wouldn't be that much higher. Generally turbocharged engines do not rev that high partly because it doesn't need to in order to make power. So it wouldn't be revving to 10,000rpms more like 6,000rpms maybe 6,500rpms.

The other problem comes down to time, its not a matter at this point about money for GM and it never was about ability. However the time it takes to develop such a engine, engineer it, get suppliers in line for parts figure out a production site get the tooling done etc...... . The Gen V we have known about for some time now and GM had made a large investment in the plant to produce them a while ago.
 

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I seem to recall a survey done back a while ago at one of the ALMS races by Tadge.

He surveyed a big group of Corvette owners. He asked if they wanted high reving vs current. only 1 guy raised his had for the high reving.

He also surveyed a bunch of engine ideas like a turbo v6, turbo v8, superchaged, ohv vs ohc, ect

Basically the result was that the buyers do not want them to change anything except the interior.
 

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That would be interesting, though will they go that far in order to try to boost sales in Europe?.

The Corvette's biggest market is the US and I wonder if this will risk its US market standing or not. I know that there are some people who will refuse to buy it if it had such a engine (or just opt not to have that engine option). Though a 3.0L (or slightly bigger as the article says) that may produce 125BHP/L and rev to 10,000 rpms. Here is where I think this starts to fall flat on its face, if the engine can rev that high then turbos not needed.

Lets say the engine peaks horsepower at 9,000rpms, then all it needs to make at that rpm is 233ft-lbs of torque. You would be able to pull that off in a 3.2L engine pretty easily IMO. Consider GMs 3.0L V-6 in the CTS produces around 223ft-lbs and this wouldn't be that much higher. Generally turbocharged engines do not rev that high partly because it doesn't need to in order to make power. So it wouldn't be revving to 10,000rpms more like 6,000rpms maybe 6,500rpms.

The other problem comes down to time, its not a matter at this point about money for GM and it never was about ability. However the time it takes to develop such a engine, engineer it, get suppliers in line for parts figure out a production site get the tooling done etc...... . The Gen V we have known about for some time now and GM had made a large investment in the plant to produce them a while ago.

If you look at the article they really have no idea what are they are talking about . They say gm is going to move to a longer stroke and smaller bore like ferrari .....

F430 bore stroke 92.00 mm × 81.00 mm
612 Scaglietti bore stroke 3.50 x 3.03 in
lambo Aventador bore stroke 95mm x 76.4mm

They really don't do any research when they are typing .
Btw the New Mclaren have a very small v8 and tt and it rev very high so it possible .

There is already talk about a 3.0 V6 tt engine that gm is working on , so i don't think gm is working on a v8 of the same displacement .

Gm didn't had the money to build Cadillac ultra V8 and they already said that Cadillac will use the new gen of ohv v8 , then how could they build a completely new engine only for the vette ?
 

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If you look at the article they really have no idea what are they are talking about . They say gm is going to move to a longer stroke and smaller bore like ferrari .....

F430 bore stroke 92.00 mm × 81.00 mm
612 Scaglietti bore stroke 3.50 x 3.03 in
lambo Aventador bore stroke 95mm x 76.4mm

They really don't do any research when they are typing .
Btw the New Mclaren have a very small v8 and tt and it rev very high so it possible .

There is already talk about a 3.0 V6 tt engine that gm is working on , so i don't think gm is working on a v8 of the same displacement .

Gm didn't had the money to build Cadillac ultra V8 and they already said that Cadillac will use the new gen of ohv v8 , then how could they build a completely new engine only for the vette ?
Most people should have known that a long bore isn't good for revving really high to 10,000rpms. You would want the engine to use a shorter stroke and a wider bore to make your displacement.

And yes I know there are some high rpm turbocharged engines though they tend to be high dollar vehicles. This won't be.
 

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I have a relevant question.

If a high revving small displacement engine is vital for European sales, why is Bentley staying with its 6.25L ohv engine?


Better question

Why does no car mag or online blog question them on this?:huh:
 

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Most people should have known that a long bore isn't good for revving really high to 10,000rpms. You would want the engine to use a shorter stroke and a wider bore to make your displacement.

And yes I know there are some high rpm turbocharged engines though they tend to be high dollar vehicles. This won't be.
mi point exactly gm doesn't have the money or could not justify the use of an completely different engine for the vette, especially one that should cost much more to produce .
 

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Glad I got my 427 when they were 'hot'. :thumbsup:
 

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I don't know why some magazine all ways want to rape the vette . You don't see porsh changing the engine location on the 911 or you don't see a diesel ferrari . Fiat under stand this that is why they say the new viper will not use a ferrari engine .
 
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