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Being lazy, when the time comes I think I will do mine the turtlevette way, and just look at it once in a while...been some 13 years and push 100k miles since mine were done the usual way....

this whole topid brings to mind about a FWD car, they talk of 100 ftlbs on the spindle nut, and I have never seen the need for that, the driveshaft comes through, and honestly I see no room for it to go anywhere, so I just snug down the nutz and have over with it allready...the little clips on the inside of shaft, keeping it from coming outta the tranny easy....why they there?? never understood what on their minds with that either...pull the strut bolts, take the shaft off by just slipping it out, why that snap ring?? useless to my way of thinking....but they all have one, one's I seen anyway....

so I just snug down the bolts on the bearing and put on the cotter pin having over with it....

in fact, you know for front end work, if needed and I do't have a cotter pin...I use a #4 flat head nail....or whatever fits well, can't see the differance...it works for years now...

:huh: :WTF :thumbsup:
The Turtlevette way.:laughing:

I did a slip fit on the rear bearings in 1981. That lasted ( greased them once a year ) till last year. I did keep the sleeve/spacers in. This time I had it pressed fitted. :lookinup:


I think this is a personal call on which way you want it done.:cheers:
 

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You don't have to be an expert to work on these bearings...you just have to have patience when setting them up. Case and point - I am only 18 and rebuilt mine for the first time and had my friend turn me two shims to the sizes I needed. I got the endplay on one side to 0.0015 and the other side to 0.002-0.0025. Pressed fitted the bearings and everything...you just need to research how to rebuild them. Other than that, these arms are really easy to rebuild...
 

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yada yada, you have until you're 60 to finish yours......

think you will make it.??:smack

I'm paranoid about being in Canada (for example) when one of these things burns up. I don't like being stuck 600 miles from home. I don't have week to do the work on the road and i don't have a week to find someone and wait for them to do it.

I've been milling over another idea. I'll just carry a whole bearing housing assy already set up with the spindle and greased. That should'nt take that much time to swap.

as far as i can see the only difference between left and right is where the flat is milled on the shock mount holes. I just take a shock mount and extend the flat spot all the way down the length with a grinder and vollia you have a right or left hand assy.
True, I didn't take age into consideration...some people just want to drive and enjoy their vette. I guess it all depends on what satisfies the owner. Anyways, lets get back to the trailing arm discussion:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #106
Hey guys don't load this thread up with crap now. It's meant to be helpful not turn into a debate. There are several ways to do most jobs so this is offered as the one I've used.

Jeremy, you have done a great deal on your own and your confidence is beyond that of a lot of guys double your age but be careful with your recommendations. You can't base a objective statement from only one experience.

This is job that has to be precisely setup or it will fail.

Without access to the correct tools and a surface grinder the job can be done but it will be much harder. A first timer may have a big problem that will cause him more time and money in the long run. With good mechanical ablity,the correct tools, and guidence then yes it's not a bad job but to deal with the odd ball problems that do arise you do need to be an expert. One thing I learned a long time ago is to follow the old saying "expect the unexpected" that's one thing I can't type out on a thread. I add to the threads as I encounter them but there's always something out of the usual on a lot of jobs. I've been in the machine-tool trade and working on vettes for 30 years now and there's always something to learn.

Again guys it's good to hear everyone opinion but let's keep things in proper perspective for the new guys wanting to learn about this.

Thanks
 

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Hey guys don't load this thread up with crap now. It's meant to be helpful not turn into a debate. There are several ways to do most jobs so this is offered as the one I've used.

Jeremy, you have done a great deal on your own and your confidence is beyond that of a lot of guys double your age but be careful with your recommendations. You can't base a objective statement from only one experience.

This is job that has to be precisely setup or it will fail.

Without access to the correct tools and a surface grinder the job can be done but it will be much harder. A first timer may have a big problem that will cause him more time and money in the long run. With good mechanical ablity,the correct tools, and guidence then yes it's not a bad job but to deal with the odd ball problems that do arise you do need to be an expert. One thing I learned a long time ago is to follow the old saying "expect the unexpected" that's one thing I can't type out on a thread. I add to the threads as I encounter them but there's always something out of the usual on a lot of jobs. I've been in the machine-tool trade and working on vettes for 30 years now and there's always something to learn.

Again guys it's good to hear everyone opinion but let's keep things in proper perspective for the new guys wanting to learn about this.

Thanks

ONLY TWO comments to the above....


rule #1, mass production units, means mass production faults, means mass failures.....

rule #2, mass production means there aint' no two alike.....

rule#3, forget all that BS you learned in HSshool about mass production....


:devil: :devil: :lookinup: :surprised :cheers:
 

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You are correct Gary - I shouldn't be basing my facts off of only one rebuild, as I didn't encounter any major problems with my arms. You do need access to a surface grinder though if you want to do the best job possible. Anyways, lets end all this crap now so this thread gets back to the main topic on how to rebuild arms correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #109
Here is what I found a spindle tonight after cleaning it up. The center of the large journal was turned down. This was from a spun bearing race as the OD was uniform. I didn't see it until I polished the spindle in the lathe. I suspect the previous guy wrecked the journal trying to remove the bearing the wrong way and then turned it to clean it up- 023" undersize. Now there is some of the original diameter there but I'm going to install a new USA spindle. This arm also had a bent caliper bracker and bent arm. Nice how those spindle presses work on old rust welded arms.

 

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Discussion Starter #110
I switched to a larger diameter cotter pin for the spindle nut. I like it because it's a snug fit not loose like I see on some jobs. I just found out that the larger radius of the head may extend beyond the nut a little too much and the flange ID could hit it. I just checked this on a set of arms I'm doing now and did find the overall length was a problem. I just bent up the head and cut the ends. Just something else to look at doing these.

here is a new flange


Here is an original flange
 

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Great write up Gary, and I think you have convinced me to leave this to the pros. You are on the east coast. Can you recommend someone here on the west coast that will do as thorough a job as you would. I was hoping to drop mine off. If I ship, I'll ship to you. Can you email or PM me your prices. I have offset trailing arms on the way, and I want my bearings done before I install the new arms.
Bee Jay
 

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Great write up Gary, and I think you have convinced me to leave this to the pros. You are on the east coast. Can you recommend someone here on the west coast that will do as thorough a job as you would. I was hoping to drop mine off. If I ship, I'll ship to you. Can you email or PM me your prices. I have offset trailing arms on the way, and I want my bearings done before I install the new arms.
Bee Jay
The only person closer to you that I would trust (other than Gary) would be tracdogg2. He's located in Garland, Texas.
 

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Discussion Starter #113
If you have new offset arms you might want to check them to see if you have the same issues others had recently.
 

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Aftermarket Trailing Arms?

gtr1999, I want to say I appreciate your knowledge and the awesome ability to narrate an install. I have a 74, just purchased, with the knowledge I have work ahead of me. The front and rear suspensions are shot. I want to make any improvements over stock as feasible but don't want to throw money at something that may not be necessary. Is there any advantage to going to an aftermarket billet type trailing arm or is a stock trailing arm properly rebuilt sufficient for say road course type driving. I want it to handle curves and horsepower. Do you sell Assemblies?
 

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thanks gary!
another great post
 

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Discussion Starter #116
Thanks Grumpy.

RK- IMO. as long as the stock arms are not rotted or bent they can be reused. I always clean and then check the arms when I have them apart to be sure they're ok.

I have not used any AM billet arms so I couldn't say if they're worth the added expense or not. I have found the stock arms or the USA made replacement arms to handle most applications.

I rebuild units vs exchanging. I'd rather work with someone and their original parts. That way they know what they sent me is what they get back. Some of the exchange units I've seen had issues with QC in certain areas. This was not limited to one vendor either.

I recommend you take your time and get your suspensions apart and then make a judgement after inspection.

Good luck with your project, if you need any help let me know.
 

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Researhing.

As for set ups, I ahve been looking at several so called upgrades. How much of an upgrade is changing to some of the offerings by Vansteel? for front and rear. They also mention a mono spring app for the front? Is this worth the money?
 

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If you have new offset arms you might want to check them to see if you have the same issues others had recently.
My offset trailing arms arrived today. I bought them from Mid America and assumed they were Van Steel. Whose arms are these? Do you see any problems with them?
Bee Jay

 
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