Corvette Forum : DigitalCorvettes.com Corvette Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am speaking of removing/replacing rear rotors and of course the calipers must be loosened off and swung out of the way.

I believe the mount bolts are a 5/8" head. Anyone have a weapon of choice? Ratchet (3/8") with 6-sided socket? Socket with 24" breaker bar (3/8")? Or 1/2" impact wrench (the proverbial toothless 240 ft-lb variety) with correct impact socket? Or take them sequentially.

My fear is rounding off the bolt heads. I have the rotors (NAPA top line) but not replacement grade 8 bolts (on order). I may just have a go at it and see what happens. If things do not progress well then I will wait until replacement bolts are here and perhaps chicken out and take it to my GM dealer.

The rivets are gone on both sides so that is not an issue. That would suggest the bolts have been off before but I have no idea at what torque they were put back on and with or without red LocTite.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
910 Posts
I always use a 1/2" breaker bar with 6 point socket with cheater pipe if necessary with no problems. Then you can use a 3/8" drive ratchet from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I always use a 1/2" breaker bar with 6 point socket with cheater pipe if necessary with no problems. Then you can use a 3/8" drive ratchet from there.
Perhaps this is much ado about nothing! Although I do work at home in a garage without a lift; just a 3-ton jack and jack stands. Not the best of circumstances.

I gave the differential fill plug a try last week and heard a number of horror stories about four-foot leverage bars, etc. But it actually came off fairly easily with a two-foot breaker bar, extension to get in there, and the recommended 8-point 5/8" socket (not a job for a crescent wrench). BTW, fluid was nice and clean and the level bang-on.

So I may get lucky with the caliper bolts! Or not....

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,516 Posts
Cool

Glad you found your answer :thumbsup:

yah know I noticed your sockets are etched
for giving socket size

I've been waiting all my life for manufactures to finally figure that one out :laughing:

It helps in low light situations
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
A good way to get stubborn bolts loose within the confines of a wheelwell is a closed end wrench smacked with a hammer.

FWIW Lifts are about convenience and speed. There's actually no automotive task which requires a lift, every job has an alternate approach with other tools/methods.

The majority of home lifts are man-cave jewelry. Don't get caught up thinking a job will be done better based on height. What's in front of you is 100% capable of producing the desired outcome.

Good luck with the project
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
You've got the Vette and tools out, must mean spring has come to your area! Been a slow rise for us here too.

After 3+ decades of working on cars, I like to say the majority of the task can be dealing with corroded and buggered up fasteners! Everytime you take a tool to one, the slip, squeek n' snap or no budge can happen. It's good to have a plan and approach to this with the correct tools and methods. As one broken fastener can turn the job into a nightmare!
I never hurts to clean threads prior to installation either.

I prefer to use hand tools the majority of the time, having developed a feel for things. And I've found that the quality of tool used can affect the outcome. Good quality tools can last a lifetime, and make tasks easier.
I find myself still collecting tools to this day. I'm starting to outgrow my 5th tool box. :laughing:
After seeing your work on 2 Vettes over the years, I know your project will turn out good Paul.
Good luck!
:cheers:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A good way to get stubborn bolts loose within the confines of a wheelwell is a closed end wrench smacked with a hammer.

FWIW Lifts are about convenience and speed. There's actually no automotive task which requires a lift, every job has an alternate approach with other tools/methods.

The majority of home lifts are man-cave jewelry. Don't get caught up thinking a job will be done better based on height. What's in front of you is 100% capable of producing the desired outcome.

Good luck with the project
That's an interesting perspective. And thanks for the good wishes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You've got the Vette and tools out, must mean spring has come to your area! Been a slow rise for us here too.

After 3+ decades of working on cars, I like to say the majority of the task can be dealing with corroded and buggered up fasteners! Everytime you take a tool to one, the slip, squeek n' snap or no budge can happen. It's good to have a plan and approach to this with the correct tools and methods. As one broken fastener can turn the job into a nightmare!
I never hurts to clean threads prior to installation either.

I prefer to use hand tools the majority of the time, having developed a feel for things. And I've found that the quality of tool used can affect the outcome. Good quality tools can last a lifetime, and make tasks easier.
I find myself still collecting tools to this day. I'm starting to outgrow my 5th tool box. :laughing:
After seeing your work on 2 Vettes over the years, I know your project will turn out good Paul.
Good luck!
:cheers:
Rod,
You sure have a good memory! Yes I have been working on and driving these Tupperware cars for many years. But always as an amateur who dislikes shop rates (these days at GM) of $110.00/hr). I try to get most things done but there can be a limit where professional help is needed.

Some of my tools are ~50-years-old and handed down from my long-deceased Father. They never break. Many are a brand called Gray that I guess is history now. And of course non are metric. But I have modern sets of metric and inches as well.

I have been busy the last couple of weeks getting ready for 2011. I've completely re-done the spark plug wires with 8-mm Accel (hand cut and crimped) and gone over-the-top with R&M looms. GM underneath wires were not satisfactory as my NOM 350 lacks the factory looms and shields. Heck, a mod here and there does not hurt.

All belts (ALT, P/S, A/C) have been replaced. I did run out of band-aids to control the blood flow but shop towels stepped in to take up the slack.

I also installed daytime driving lamps (DRLs) as I had on my 1967. It took some time with all the wiring (cutting/soldering/shrink wrapping, etc) but heck it is a hobby. I truly believe these are a frontal safety feature despite many who pooh-pooh them.

So today promised 65*F and sun and it was time for a shake-down run. The car ran very well and I am pleased. The overflow tank puked a bit but it tends to seek its own level each spring after I top up and it settles down.

I will tackle the rear brakes next week. I rebuilt the BBQ yesterday and today is t-bone and chardonnay time for the first time. I don't want to get in a bad mood because of caliper bolts.

Here are a couple of pics (with DRLs).





Normally they are ignition-on when the car is running. To the manufacturer's kit I added an under dash toggle switch with an ON red LED that allows me manual control if need be. Look carefully, it is there.



DRLs on my former 1967.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If the rotors do not slip off easily, and I have to beat them about a bit with a rubber hammer, is this a recipe for snapping off a wheel stud?
 

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
3,785 Posts
Paul
As you found out with the diff,sometimes the jobs sound harder then you expect and then the jobs you figure would be done in no time kill you. Example, on every differential I check and adjust the bearing cap fit, usually a stock untouched diff is good, well I have in a 63 diff that was worked on in the past and I found the caps were swapped from side to side and still were no where near where they should be, I had to spend hours fitting them in the mill and grinder.

So, what should be a relatively easy task can be a job. Those are 5/8 head, 7/16-20 bolts. I would try the extension to see how hard they are. A 3/8 drive 5/8 socket and extension will fit in there without much problen and a step up with a 1/2" breaker bar may all you need.

With the new NAPA rotors,they probably don't have the rivet holes so will have to rely on just the lug nuts to hold them on. Be sure to check the runout in the rotors as I'm, sure you'll find them over 005". I've used them and transfer the bolt pattern from the rivet holes to the rotor hat and then drill and countersink them. Then you can dial them in and bolts them on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
6-point sockets for hex heads. you have to have a complete set.

12-point sockets are for those ARP 12-point bolts & similar, etc.

otherwise you WILL have rounded-off bolt heads... eventually, of course, at the worst possible time, in the most inaccessible location.

that's how it works. I didn't make up these rules, some guy named Murphy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
With the new NAPA rotors,they probably don't have the rivet holes so will have to rely on just the lug nuts to hold them on. Be sure to check the runout in the rotors as I'm, sure you'll find them over 005". I've used them and transfer the bolt pattern from the rivet holes to the rotor hat and then drill and countersink them. Then you can dial them in and bolts them on.

Gary,

I am unclear on this. Are you suggesting that I drill holes in the new rotor caps according to the old rivet hole patterns and then bolt the new rotors on to the spindle flanges? And then install normally with lug nuts? If yes, to be quite honest I do not have a drill press for that kind of work.

(Ignore the black paint. My idea of rust-proofing.)

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
So today promised 65*F and sun and it was time for a shake-down run. The car ran very well and I am pleased. The overflow tank puked a bit but it tends to seek its own level each spring after I top up and it settles down.
The weather has been freaky this spring around here. Hot one day hail and freezing rain after.

I got mine out of storage 2weeks ago now... started right up no issues. The Honda's ran in fear:devil:. Right now im waiting on parts in the pocession of UPS whom want $40 brokerage after i paid $20 to ship the $59 worth of parts:WTF... sometimes it blows living up here when you own a 'vette.

Good to see another one is on the road:thumbsup:
 

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
3,785 Posts
Paul
Yes that is how I do them, is it necessary? to most probably not but it is a way to hold the runout once dialed in. If you look at Ray Y's thread on the trailing arms I built for him you'll see the Wilwood rotors are bolted on, those I setup and transfered and kept the runout at the 001-002 I set it up at. Those also didn't have the rivet holes. When you have the rotors with the rivet holes they line up pretty close and you can set them up. The rotor has to be countersunk and the spindle flange tapped so only you can decide if it's worth the time to do it and if you have all the tools and materials.

If you get a consistent readings under 005" then you may be ok. I don't like anything over 0025" myself. In order to transfer them with the spindles in the arm you would have to make a template up to transfer the pattern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Gary,

I simply cannot do that kind of work although I admire people like you who do this to perfection! I'll give this a try tomorrow and we'll see what happens....crossed fingers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The weather has been freaky this spring around here. Hot one day hail and freezing rain after.

I got mine out of storage 2weeks ago now... started right up no issues. The Honda's ran in fear:devil:. Right now im waiting on parts in the pocession of UPS whom want $40 brokerage after i paid $20 to ship the $59 worth of parts:WTF... sometimes it blows living up here when you own a 'vette.

Good to see another one is on the road:thumbsup:
Small world. I did the spring check-out today for about 90 minutes on Riverside, Heron, Bank, Bronson, Walkley, and Hunt Club. Note the speeds are 50kph to 80kph (30mph to 50mph). A little overflow tank puke as I mentioned earlier but that is normal after a top-up. The engine establishes each spring its chosen level for summer. Somewhat strange but it does. But overall the car hums. I was encouraged.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
Small world. I did the spring check-out today for about 90 minutes on Riverside, Heron, Bank, Bronson, Walkley, and Hunt Club. Note the speeds are 50kph to 80kph (30mph to 50mph). A little overflow tank puke as I mentioned earlier but that is normal after a top-up. The engine establishes each spring its chosen level for summer. Somewhat strange but it does. But overall the car hums. I was encouraged.

I thought your car looked familiar lol, i live off baseline and i work off innes. You may or may not have seen me... im keeping from long cruises until i get my signals working.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top