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Discussion Starter · #121 ·
Reassembly

This is the part I dread the most. Installing window trim, emblems, bumpers, door handles, mirrors, all come with the risk of damaging the new paint. Good adhesion really helps, that's why surfaces in underlying areas are prepared for paint just like the outer surfaces.

Seems ridiculous to try and tell you how to put pieces back on your car, so I'll just add a few tips.

Tape the edges of chrome bumpers and the install areas, if the tape does touch it usually won't chip the paint. Two people makes bumper installing much easier.

Emblem holes will have shrunk with the application of paint, resize the holes with a correctly sized drill bit before installing emblems or trim clips.

Clean, repaint and polish trim as needed before installing.

Window trim will usually go on pretty well, the problem comes when it has to be removed because the piece installed wasn't put on in the correct order. Lay out the parts, test fit and understand how they assemble. Compare that to the shape of the window gutter. It's usually apparent in which order they must be installed. For example: On this car the top of the rear window trim was one piece, bottom front corner on one side to bottom front corner on the other. The lower trim had to be inserted into each side and slid forward inside the upper trim to fit into the lower gutter.

Clean all bulbs and any exposed sockets before installing them. Special attention to make sure ground clips are not covered with over spray.

Re-threading capture nuts and bolts takes a little time but it allows you to screw bolts in with your fingers. This reduces the chance tools will slip and chip freshly painted surfaces.

New gaskets and seals on door handles, locks and mirrors add a professional touch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #122 ·
Conclusion

I hope this series of posts has passed along some information you can use. In the extreme, given you the push you needed to give it a try. It's a big step, requiring a commitment in tools and materials. At the same time it isn't rocket science either.

At the very least having read this blog you have a respectful understanding of the amount of work involved in painting your Corvette. If you just don't have the desire to try it yourself, at least you shouldn't be shocked or surprised at the usual 5 figure sum of the paint shop quote.

My intent was to post a video of the finished car sitting outside in sunshine. The weather prevented that and the customer picked up the car before weather improved. I had taken a few stills earlier and will post all. If the opportunity presents itself later on I'll grab a video and post.
 

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DC PIT CREW BOSS
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Thanks Bud. This whole write up is awesom:thumbsup:e
 
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DC PIT CREW BOSS
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Awesome. I bet he is one happy camper
 

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very detailed work and outstanding result. I wish you were closer to me to do my 69!
 

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7TRoadster posted one of the best finishing guides I've ever seen. I've done a lot of steel body work but this was my first plastic body. I followed the guide almost to a T, the only exception was that after all paint was removed using 7TRoadster's guide I sprayed the body with Southern Polyurethane epoxy after consulting with Southern Polyurethane. Other than that, I followed the guide. The main thing I would emphasize is the importance of keeping the raw SMC absolutely clean. It can and will absorb contaminants, and sometimes it cannot be removed thereby ruining the panel. One of the worst is silicone based lubricants. Keep that stuff OUT of your body prep area.

IMG_2374.JPG
 

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Sand the Glass to Contour

Use the sanding block and course paper (100 grit) to smooth the top off the glass repair. When you get the high spots down to not quite flat, switch to 220 grit for flattening and blending the edges. The 11" block is what I used to do this work, I know it's faster to use a sander but my experience is that sanders eat into the glass quickly and leave it wavy so
wow, I wish I would have found this a day earlier! I found out the hard way that a sander leaves the corvette wavy. what's the technique to straighten the glass without weakening the glass anymore? what should I use as a filler?
 

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Assuming you still have bare glass I would scuff it up good with 100 grit, add a layer of glass and try again. I use this for filler: Evercoat Vette Panel Adhesive/Filler FIB-870
Okay. I bought some of that filler the other day. I took the paint off of my car because the original gold paint was no good. I took it down to the fiberglass, which looks like a gray primer. the rear deck is a bit wavy. you would lay fiberglass over it and sand it down? or just evenly spread the filler over it and raise the lows?
 

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Discussion Starter · #138 ·
From what you described and your concern about thickness, I thought you had sanded through the gel coat down to bare fiberglass. So let's back up a bit, how deep to you think you went? What grit of sandpaper did you use? If you can see fibers your down to the glass, if you see what looks like primer that is likely the gel coat.

First thing is to evaluate how deep the low spots are, I use a straight edge to see how much of a fill is required. .

Corrective action depends on how much you have to fill. If it's more than a 1/16" then glass, if less filler is ok. Anything a 32nd or less you can usually fill with primer. It takes a bit of blocking but at this point your gonna have that either way. I would only fill the low spots, get it as flat as you can with 220 and then use primer to block it truly flat.

If you read the Finish the Glass sections above it presents information I won't repeat here.
 

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From what you described and your concern about thickness, I thought you had sanded through the gel coat down to bare fiberglass. So let's back up a bit, how deep to you think you went? What grit of sandpaper did you use? If you can see fibers your down to the glass, if you see what looks like primer that is likely the gel coat.

First thing is to evaluate how deep the low spots are, I use a straight edge to see how much of a fill is required. .

Corrective action depends on how much you have to fill. If it's more than a 1/16" then glass, if less filler is ok. Anything a 32nd or less you can usually fill with primer. It takes a bit of blocking but at this point your gonna have that either way. I would only fill the low spots, get it as flat as you can with 220 and then use primer to block it truly flat.

If you read the Finish the Glass sections above it presents information I won't repeat here.
thanks for your time! yeah, I would assume that what I am seeing is the grey gelcoat then, I can only see fibers in one spot. I'll fill it in and follow your directions. I really appreciate your time.

Paul
 

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this might be the Helpful post for me that I’ve read yet. I’m learning so much.
Just for clarification purposes for me, get the car down to the gel coat/fiberglass, smooth out and fill with vette panel adhesion(which would be similar to bondo for a metal car) then sand and then instead of a gel coat or epoxy spray feather filler on, then spray primer..... in a nutshell, am I understanding the substance order correct?
 
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