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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For thin metal, speed up or slow down wire feed? as compared to thicker metal?
I have .023 wire loaded, trying to weld on 22 ga steel, welder set to lowest good arc and its blowing holes in my material. I know this stuff is thin, but it is weldable, how do you do it? Useing ar/co mix
 

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Might have to stitch weld. Thats how they weld even heavy gauge steel on the tv shows :crazy:

I think thats what its called.
 

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yup, stich weld and if you need to run short beads, weld it with a hammer or a dolly (or a block of copper if you have that) on the back so you don't blow holes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ahhhh, I knew there was a way to do that. Already doing the stitch thing.

Thanks guys
 

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Mr. Six . . . . 22ga might be too thin especially if the steel you are welding to is thicker to get good penetration. I relate that to welding a repop part on a 50's or 60's car. The original sheet metal is so thick you could almost run a bead, problem is the repop is about 20ga and it's easy to destroy it.

I assume you are fabbing patches for doors and I'm pretty sure you'll have better luck welding with 18ga as a minimum. 18ga is thin enough to form fairly easy yet thick enough to achieve a good weld with a mig. My favorite welder for sheet metal is a small Lincoln 135. A lot of the settings for your welder you'll learn through trial and error. Your welder settings may be different, but on a Lincoln if your heat setting is A-B-C-D try B and if it blows through quickly, drop to A. Match your speed to the A or B setting which will probably be around 3,4, or 5 on a scale of 10. Whereas I was welding a frame kick up last week and used D with a speed of 7 or 8. The lower the heat the slower the wire feed until it has the right steady and even popping sound.

Unless you have an automatic stitch adapter, you'll need to make lots of tacks doing sheet metal, don't try to run a bead, there will be too much heat and the part will warp. If you have a 12" section for instance, start with a tack in the center, then do one on an end, then back to the center, etc, etc. Keeping heat away from one particular spot and letting the area cool before proceding.


Looks rather ugly above, but after it's ground down it looks much better. You can also fill in voids with weld so that everything is metal again. After ginding the seams are smooth and the door jam area seams disappear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
TT, the copper plate thing worked like a Nut, Thank You

Ahoover

Good info, I have the stitch thing figured out for the thin stuff, read that in a book. I didn't know what the wire feed speed/heat relation was so good tips from you. I'll be checking that out tomorrow night.
I have a Daytona Mig 160, it has 1 - 6 for voltage setting, I have it on 4 with the wire speed about 4 of 10 and am useing .023 wire. Tonight I was welding in some 16ga for the door hinge post in the door. I found that starting the stitch on the new metal and rotate the nozzle onto the old that it worked pretty well. Tomorrow I'll be working the thin stuff again and will try some practice welds before I get on the door


Thanks Guys
 
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