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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
So I have everything out but the trailing arm bolt through thr frame, can't get it loose, tried a breaker bar, it's soaking curretly with some penetrating oil, but figured I'd ask if there is a better way

Thanks
Ed
 

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Those bolts can be a PITA. If you can get the shims on either side out, you can get some more room to soak them too. What are you using for penetrating oil? My personal favorite is Hoppe's #9 Gun Solvent. I've seen it work when the others failed.
If soaking them dosen't work, it's time for the sawzall.
 

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lots of guys have real trouble with those bolts. Do a quick search and you'll turn up plenty of info. But don't let the horror stories scare you. :laughing:
 

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.....don't let the horror stories scare you. :laughing:
Yeah, you'll be adding your own in a week or so...

I like P'blaster as a rust busting penetrant, but had to resort to several sawsall blades.

One tip for the blades: After you've worn out the teeth near the tip, use a metal cut-off wheel on an angle grinder, or a chop saw to cut off the worn out section, and voila! Fresh teeth! You can do this about three times before the blade is too short to use. It'll save $ on blades.
 

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I got lucky and beat the outer shims on each side into submission, so all I had to do was cut through the bolt. However, the inner shims wouldn't give up, so I had to cut through the shims and the bolts. More patience required.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, I guess Ill try one more time on turning the nut, but it doesnt seem like over all there is much success with that.

if all else fails Ill just cut it out, was hoping to avoid that but oh well.

As to the shims, are they held in with the retaining pin at the very front of the "pocket" in the frame there? Or how do I go about trying to remove the shims. I suppose I had assumed they were "wrapped" around the bolt, but it sounds like that isnt the case. I may need to refer back to my repair manual.

Thanks again for all the input guys.
Ed
 

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I just took mine out, i used an air hammer with a long chisel bit to get on the end of the bolt,the threaded end,knocked them right out. Now the rear bearing and spindle assembly is another story :thud:
 

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Piece of pipe or jack handle on the breaker bar as a cheater, it only takes a foot or two to move a mountain. May require a helper to hold the socket steady depending.

Getting the bolt out is another story. But a cheater that size will break just about any automotive suspension bolt loose. Or just plain break it in extreme cases. Do the math and 18 inches of cheater will allow 500-800 ft-lbs even with a cube dweller's physique :cheers:

When you get good at cheatin, there will be instances where it's easier to just put a turn of tightness on and pop the head off.

The other trick is to seperate your breakaway torques. First turn the bolt without the nut restrained to break the bolt shank free of it's rust bond Then apply the wrench and break the threads free. Old suspension bolts the shank rust is what's stopping you more than the actual threads.

Cheater system for large combination wrenches is to loop the next size up wrench over the open end and use it as a cheater handle. This often allows close-quarters breakaway on suspension nuts with extremely stuck bolt shanks, so that breaking the shank rust bond can be step two.

good luck
 

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If you have to cut them use a longer blade with a narrow point makes it easier to see what is going on in the pocket.
also make sure your saw has a trigger lock save your fingers.
 

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When I did mine I used 8" Lennox titanium coated blades from Lowes. I ran them at max speed for 20 to 30 second intervals with a 20 second cool down time and in under 10 minutes I cut through the bolt on both sides of the trailing arm. The blades ran around $20 for a five pack. Good luck:thumbsup:
 

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Forgot to mention one other thing when it comes to sawzall blades: GO SLOW! Like really slow, maybe 3-4 strokes per second. Similar to drilling steel, slower is better, cuts much quicker than rapid strokes which pretty much just kill the teeth, don't forget the cutting oil, apply often to cool and clean out chips.
 

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Forgot to mention one other thing when it comes to sawzall blades: GO SLOW! Like really slow, maybe 3-4 strokes per second. Similar to drilling steel, slower is better, cuts much quicker than rapid strokes which pretty much just kill the teeth, don't forget the cutting oil, apply often to cool and clean out chips.
I found that when I only oiled the blade when it was out of the cut, I could cool the blade without cooling the bolt. This made it go much faster.

Also, just use a vice grip to snap off the end of teh blade once the teeth get dull. I bought 12" blades and got 3 uses out of each blade.

I used a cold chisel and a sledge hammer to knock the shims loose, and then I was only succesful on the outer shims.

It took me 3 days to get mine out.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It took me 3 days to get mine out.
Holy sh!t, I quit.

Nah, hopefully it will go smoother than that, I don't have a ton of time to work on it at once, so hopefully this doesn't drag out for a month.

Thanks for all the replies, it helps guys!

Anyone have any extra half shaft parts? I bent the trailing arm mating piece trying to get the u-joint out.
 

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Which piece? Is it the flange that bolts to the TA? If it is Dana makes the replacement for around $50 cause both of mine were shot and the driveshaft shop ordered me them. Good luck and hope it goes smooth for you:thumbsup:
 

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If you guys are cutting with sawzalls try an electric die grinder with a 3" x 1/8" abrasive disc to the end. Not a thin cutting disc. Totally unguarded so use gauntlet gloves and face/neck protection. It is a weapon against stuck fasteners, removing bolt heads precisely and quickly with more grinding than cutting. The unguarded head allows you to see what's happening even in tight confines.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If you guys are cutting with sawzalls try an electric die grinder with a 3" x 1/8" abrasive disc to the end. Not a thin cutting disc. Totally unguarded so use gauntlet gloves and face/neck protection. It is a weapon against stuck fasteners, removing bolt heads precisely and quickly with more grinding than cutting. The unguarded head allows you to see what's happening even in tight confines.
Would that fit inside the "pocket"?
 

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It may, it may not. Depends on the grinder and the car's state of disassembly. For me the sawzall is a tool of absolute last resort as it's harder on surrounding pieces than the precise control of high speed wheels. Never seen anyone else use a grinder as a mechanic's tool this way but it's a real problem solver, doing things that normally require a torch. Use with caution, it's a tool that rewards slow confident cutting but punishes timidness. Best results usually come from a 98% cut then chisel strike. Good luck
 

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I just finished this repair. SPECIAL FUN!! (bashed hands)
I used a meduim sized hammer and cold chisel to move the shims up/down to break the rust bond, then a couple of cuts on either side of the arm with the sawzall and the job was done. A cutting torch might have been quicker, but the proximity to fiberglass & nice paint...
 
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