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Discussion Starter #1
My friend and I are planning on putting new rotors and pads on my c5 and painting the calipers in a few months. I found what looks like a good jacking method, but as I've never done this before I was just wondering if a few people would back up what the article I read said or suggest a better way to do it.

They said to:
-drive the car onto 2x4s
-loosen lugs
-jack the front at the aluminum cross members using a 2x4 to cushion the metal from the jack
-insert jack stands on both sides of the 2x4
-jack the rear in the same fashion

I like this method because it isn't going to put any twisting forces on the frame. and the jack stands are closer to the front and rear of the car, which seems more stable than the jack points under the rockers.

Thanks for any suggestions
 

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sounds extremely dangerous to me. wood compresses which could cause the car to shift and land on you. play it safe and use the jack points specified in the shop manual.
 

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That's pretty much how I do mine. I drive up on rams however.:thumbsup:
 

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I use pretty much the same process when I change oil on my '07 Z06. I need to drive the car up on some wood initially to get enough clearance for my floor jack.
 

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I like this method because it isn't going to put any twisting forces on the frame.

Thanks for any suggestions
There is no problem with twisting forces on your frame during jacking. if it were you would damage your frame every time you ran over a hump in the road with one wheel and not the other... Old wives tale... I get a good chuckle every time I read one of these threads.:rolling:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
"There is no problem with twisting forces on your frame during jacking. if it were you would damage your frame every time you ran over a hump in the road with one wheel and not the other... Old wives tale... I get a good chuckle every time I read one of these threads"

iburke I'm sure the frame can handle it, I just think it's more gentle on the frame not jacking one at the time. running over a hump isn't quite like lifting it all the way off the ground. i'm sure it's fine doing that, i was just saying it's unnecessary if you can do it without any torsion. i understand the structural mechanics of vehicle frames- i'm an aerospace engineer! :D
 

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"There is no problem with twisting forces on your frame during jacking. if it were you would damage your frame every time you ran over a hump in the road with one wheel and not the other... Old wives tale... I get a good chuckle every time I read one of these threads"

iburke I'm sure the frame can handle it, I just think it's more gentle on the frame not jacking one at the time. running over a hump isn't quite like lifting it all the way off the ground. i'm sure it's fine doing that, i was just saying it's unnecessary if you can do it without any torsion. i understand the structural mechanics of vehicle frames- i'm an aerospace engineer! :D
Walks away shaking his head...
 

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I slammed my car, i have 2" of ground clearance. My last c5 also. Ive jacked my car up everywere except the oil pan. One side at a time, one wheel at a time, from the arm bracket, from the crossmember, blocks and or 2x4s, i use a 82 camaro scissor jack, no other jack will fit under my car. Ive never had any issues. Nothing ever bent or colapsed etc. Its just a car, dont be scared to jack it up, or modify it :)
 

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Walks away shaking his head...
:rolling: ... Sorry but I was thinking about giving the same response.
There is no problem with twisting forces on your frame during jacking. if it were you would damage your frame every time you ran over a hump in the road with one wheel and not the other
Dips, driveways, and speed bumps cause the same twist and flex of the frame. Either you drive EXTREMELY careful or not at all or its been through worse.
 
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