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Discussion Starter #1
Alright so its not totally the batteries fault, I bought a red top and put it in backwards not paying attention like a moron. Hooked it up, heard the pop sizzle from Im guessing the starter? little smoke.

So I switched the cables, and nothing works. Not the buzzer nothing. I blew the fuse under the dash marked IGN, I replaced that with another 20 amp, I also blew the fuse that goes to my AMP, replaced that. The battery still says its putting out 12V.

When I turn the key absolutely nothing comes on, no sounds, radio lights starter nothing happens period.

I need some direction on where to start.

If I remember right there was a fuse on the wire right by the starter, if that is what smoked would that cause these problems, or is it more likely a whole list of things.

Any help,

Matt
 

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Checking and replacing all blown fuses would be a good start. Then take a test light and see where you have power to search for shorted wires. Find a wiring diagram and start on the positive side and work your way to the negative. If everything worked before and nothing works after you replace all blown fuses, you either shorted a wire or fried a connection box.

If there is an inline fuse on the wire from the battery to the starter and it's blown, nothing will work. If I remember right, all power is pulled from that wire.
 

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It could be a fusable link which is a wire that is made to burn up if there is a major problem. If I am not mistaken there are 3 of them, but not sure exactly where.
:agree: It sounds like a fusable link. I don't remember where they're located, but you should be able to find something with google.
 

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Here's some more information from my Haynes repair manual. Hopefully this will help.

Fusible links – general information

Some circuits are protected by fusible links. These links are used in circuits that are not ordinarily fused, such as the ignition circuit. If a circuit protected by a fusible link becomes inoperative, inspect for a blown fusible link. A blown fusible link appears as a short length of heavy wire that has had the insulation completely melted.

Although fusible links appear to be of heavier gauge than the wire they are protecting, their appearance is due to thicker insulation. All fusible links are several wire gauges smaller than the wire they are designed to protect. The location of the fusible links on your particular vehicle can be determined by referring to the wiring diagrams at the end of this book.

Fusible links cannot be repaired. If you must replace one, make sure that the new fusible link is a duplicate of the one removed with respect I gauge, length and insulation. Original and replacement fusible links have insulation that is flame proof. Do not fabricate a fusible link from ordinary wire – the insulation may not be flame proof. Replace fusible links as follows:

a.) Disconnect the negative cable from the battery.
b.) Disconnect the fusible link from the wiring harness.
c.) Cut the damaged fusible link out of the wiring harness just behind the connector.
d.) Strip the insulation back approximately ½ inch.
e.) Position the connector on the new fusible link and crimp it into place.
f.) Use rosin core solder at each end of the new link to obtain a good solder joint.
g.) Use plenty of electrical tape around the soldered joint.
h.) Connect the battery negative cable. Test the circuit for proper operation.

Bruce
 

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One fusible link that will allow you to have all your power accept for the starter is on driver's side of the engine compartment.

This happened to me this year so I know.
If you are getting power to radio, headlights etc but the starter isn't doing anything and you have checked the obvious stuff.

There is a fusible link (often replace I belive with an inline fuse wire) that goes from the driver's side firewall to a small metal box near the alternator (If I remember right). I belive the box is either called a voltage regulator or a horn relay. People call it both things when I asked about it.

My wire got moved and burned and shorted on my headers. It blew the fuse and everything worked accept the starter.

Hope this might help.
 

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Two places to check for fusible links on anything powered by a V8 Chevy

#1 the main starter lug. There should be the large battery cable plus several small wires. Those small wires are all fusible links, could be upwards of three depending on year and model.

#2 back of the alternator. Often the heavy wire going to the alternator has a fusible link right at the alternator.

Parts stores do sell fusible links (help rack?). They must be soldered as all vehicle power will pass thru those connections. They should have some kind of identifier in terms of rating, sometimes it's written on the plastic where the link meets normal wire.

You can also burn these by dropping a wrench between the hedder and starter lug :D

The bad one probably looks fine to the naked eye, but when disassembled you'll find the burned-out spot by flexing the wire

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the help guys, from the looks of it there is a fusible link at the starter, thats the one Ill check first, it looks like if that one is out the power to everything would be out.

Ill keep you updated thanks again for all the help.

Matt
 

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BTW, the list above mentions fusible links cannot be repaired, but if they burn near the end you may be able to shorten them. Which is kind of like a repair. Often the link burns right at where it joins the regular wire because the joint has the highest resistance, and thus the highest heat.

Not an acceptable repair method for a shiny corvette, they deserve a new link. Totally acceptable for a rusty chevette.
 

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The actual 'links' are the short sections of wire between the plastic connector and the lugs on the end.
If they've ever been replaced you'll likely just find a splice and no connector.
I BELIEVE one is for headlights and the other for pretty much everything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Alright so tonight I pulled the starter and this is what I have, where the battery connects to the starter there is another wire that heads up towards engine, it had a plastic thing on it that said fusible link 16gauge, The other wires all looked like normal wires. I disconnected everything and when I pulled on the linked wire it just came out of the insulation. I cut all the tape and insulation back and came to a spot where it was crimped and soldered.

My question is, where do I cut and replace, before the solder point? If I remember right from the reading there should be two solder points but mine only has one, so did someone just do a hack job? Also, the connection part of the wire is obviously ruined so do I just go to an autoparts store and ask for a 16 gauge fusible link?

Pictures follow.

Matt





 

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My question is, where do I cut and replace, before the solder point? If I remember right from the reading there should be two solder points but mine only has one, so did someone just do a hack job? Also, the connection part of the wire is obviously ruined so do I just go to an autoparts store and ask for a 16 gauge fusible link?



Matt

If im understanding this correctly, with that link the terminal is the other end so you would only have to solder the side going into the link. But with the new fusible link you showed you would solder the side going into the link and then crimp the terminal on the side that attaches near the starter. Unless im way of base here.
 

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Cut back to just before the red insulation, you've got a few inches of fusible link hanging onto the wire.

What does that black connector say? It's got numbers or letters

The link you provided is a wire with a fuse holder, not a fusible link. And probably too light duty
 

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Cut the solder joint off so you have fresh wire to work with. Solder the fused link to the red and simply apply a new connector on the other end of the fused link.
I like to put a COUPLE layers of shrink tube over the splice, but tape is OK.
You may be able to clean up the old connector and resolder and shrinktube that end too.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Let me just restate what I've read then so I know I'm understanding this correctly.

A fusible link then is a thinner gauge wire capable of supporting only the working load of power, it's soldered to the thicker gauge wire capable of supporting enough power to damage or destroy other parts of the car. When more then the working load is supplied the 6" fused link melts and breaks the circuit stopping the power to everything else. The link that blew on mine is what carries power to the fuse box Which is why nothing in my car works. That all sound about right?

And from what I've read now the link is always 4 gauges higher then the actual wire. So my wire would be 12 gauge meaning the link needs to be 16.

To fix my problems I cut a half in before the current soldered link, solder a new 6in 16GA fusible link on, crimp a connector on the end and reconnect everything.

Sorry I just wanna make sure I have some idea what I'm doing so I don't start a fire or blow myself up or something. Although the wife could use the life insurance I wanna stick around and bother her awhile longer.
 

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16 gauge IS correct and that link you provided will work fine.

16 ga is correct for a fusible link, the type where the wire burns.

The autozone "fusible link", for whatever reason, shows a normal wire with a fuse holder in the middle. In this instance he'd want a 12ga wire attached to the fuse holder, not 16.

The starter sees a lot of heat and not sure I'd want a fuse holder down there. Those chineese fuse holders might be hard and crumbly in 5 years.
 
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