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Discussion Starter #1
We pretty much got all the drive line,suspension,steering and brakes done.
the problem is the manual brakes just dont stop the car the way I want them to.
So,heres the plan I am thinking about geting one of the ABS power brake eletric power boosted brake systems and some Willwood D8 calipers for the front.
http://www.abspowerbrake.com/ehpm.html
I dont have power steering so no hydra boost.
SO what do you all think.
 

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Lemme ask you this, can you lock up all four wheels when you stand on the pedal?

What work, if any, has been done to your braking system?

Healthy master? When and how was the last time you bled the brakes? Rotor runout will actually suck air into the system as you drive around.
 

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I am more than impressed with my manual brakes.
Also... I dont think the D8 calipers offer any more clamping force. If your whole brake system is in check, try some more aggressive pad compounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have replaced master cyl. all 4 calipers with O ring calipers, some new steel lines and new SS hoses.
The pedal is rock hard but they will not lock up brake pads are one of the hawk series dont remember which ones.
yea I know that the D8s will not give any more clamping force but I might remove a little weight from the front.
 

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I have replaced master cyl. all 4 calipers with O ring calipers, some new steel lines and new SS hoses.
The pedal is rock hard but they will not lock up brake pads are one of the hawk series dont remember which ones.
yea I know that the D8s will not give any more clamping force but I might remove a little weight from the front.

When you re-attached the pedal rod from the master to the pedal, did you attach it to the upper or lower pedal hole?

You 'should' be full well and able to lock up the wheels with well tuned manual brakes unless you're running a wide or sticky tire.

Did you get a stock replacement master? I wonder if maybe the bore is different.
 

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You 'should' be full well and able to lock up the wheels with well tuned manual brakes unless you're running a wide or sticky tire.
key point there. What rubber are you running? I'm also pretty happy with my manual brakes, but I'm running BFG Radial T/A's in 225 up front and 255 out back. Can lock them up without breaking a sweat.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The master cyl. is a power brake cyl. when I first got the car the brakes were terrible so I got a power brake kit but when I saw it was going to be a major PITA I just installed the new master cyl. at the time I didnt know there was a difference between the power and manual master cyls.
So your question is going to be why dont you just get a manual master cyl?
Well I am trying to avoid body work I hate body work so I need a new mechanical project .
1800 to 2000 psi sounds like it might stop the car better than manual brakes too.
 

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How bad is the pricing of those systems?

Are the electrical units loud? I'm imaging a sound similar to a hydraulic pump for low riders.
 

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A booster master is 1-1/8" dia bore in the lower pedal hole and a manual master 1" bore in the upper pedal hole.
Manuals won't work any other way.
Also may take a few miles to bed the pads in.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The price is a little nasty they claim the pump noise is less than a fuel pump.
Although I have heard some very loud fuel pumps.
The only time you should hear the pump is when you first hit the key and it pressurizes the acumulator and then now and then to keep it topped off but then it will be hidden by engine noise.
 

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Can you explain this to me?

Not in highly technical terms, but a wobbly rotor will rapidly push and pull the caliper pistons...kind of a pulsation. If the seals are a little less than healthy, and on stock calipers they usually are, this will either push fluid out or suck air in.

If fluid is pushed out, there is evidence of the problem, and it can be addressed.

However, if air is being sucked in it simply works it's way up through the system to the master. There is a constant flow of air, displacing small amounts of brake fluid into the master so the brakes feel mushy but the fluid level appears topped off.

As more air works up to the master it simply purges itself into the air pocket in the master under the lid.

It's kind of hard to detect except for mushy brakes, with no leaking, and full fluid level. The giveaway is that a bleeding procedure gets good solid braking. Slowly the brakes get mushy again for no apparent reason.

Generally a true rotor with minimal runout will not cause this to happen. Like I said, I have no hard evidence, but I have corrected the problem before. I don't really even know how to test for t unless you ave both bad rotor runout and mushy brakes.
 
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