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Okay, so many of you are aware of the NIGHTMARE of an old mechanic that I had "rebuilding" my beloved C3. Well finally about a year ago I pulled the plug on this jerk. Went over to his shop, got all of my parts that I could find. <less about 2.5k worth.> packed up my car and drug it off on a trailer to a new mechanic. Well, about a month ago this guy was finally able to start working on her full time. <That was part of the agreement, he had two resto's in front of mine.>

So here is whats going on now. He took the frame off and is about to install the engine and drive train. However, before we can do that, we have to find the camshaft information for the engine build. The old mechanic seems to have lost the cam card for my camshaft. <We need to figure out the torque converter.> So what happens now? Am I screwed and have to buy another cam? Is there any way that I can find that information on the camshaft itself? Any thoughts?

I am not joking when I tell you that this project has disheartened me to the point that I almost hate looking at corvettes. I hope that once I get her running again, that the love that I have had since I was a little boy comes back. Other wise, there may be a real steal of a car for sale... :(

Thanks
John.
 

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Sorry to hear the Bad News... Did the other Guy Put the Cam In your engine? If he did he may have that info for you...
Dont get to the point that you want to sell it, The day you do you will regret it... Just keep on Keeping on with your project. It will be worth it in the end..

Dan
 

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Check for the cam grind # on one of the ends of the cam. that will tell you exactly what you have
 

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As the others have said look for the grind number on the cam. If there is nothing there your only other option I know of is to pull it out and find someone to run it on a cam doctor. The cam doctor will tell you all the specs.
 

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What does this engine have for heads and valvesprings and rocker studs and lifters and schtuff? I don't mean exactly what is it, but are studs pressed, pinned or screwed? Stock type valvesprings or big roller cam springs? +.1 length valves can be identified with a dial caliper. Are lifters hydraulic, solid, or roller? You ought to be able to reasonably guess the cam's range just by the other components it's working with

If you've got stockish heads and a dual plane intake just have your guy install a standard corvette (sometime also called S10 in the transmission builder world) converter which is 2500ish stall.

If you've got screw in studs, fancy spring retainers, a single plane intake, or solid lifters, go for an aftermarket 2800 stall.

If you're just feeling a little crazy and want a saturday night playtoy, go 2800 even if you have the milder setup. It will burn out like a mofo.

When you start approaching the need for 3000 stall, that's a hairy beast under the hood. You'd know it just from the cubic spending. And the 4.10-4.56 gears out back.

With aftermarket converters you get what you pay for. Cheap converters eat power with slip, pricier converters put the power down efficiently with the same hi-stall launch response. Stock vette/s10 type converters are pretty efficient and cost effecive.
 

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If the mechanic has your cam in his hand and can't figure out what it is, I would load every thing back on the trailer and run as fast as I could away from there. Where do you find these guys???:thud:
 

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Looking at your pics you should be able to pull the inspection cover from your timing chain cover to get the numbers from the end of the cam
 
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