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PONTOISE, France — A French court found Continental Airlines and a mechanic at the airline guilty on Monday of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the 2000 Concorde crash that killed 113 people.

The accident led to the supersonic airliner being grounded for good.

Continental pledged to appeal and branded the verdict as "absurd," saying it showed the French authorities' determination to shift the blame from Air France, which operated the jet and was owned by the French government at the time.

The court in the Paris suburb of Pontoise ruled that the Houston-based airline must pay 1.08 million euros ($1.43 million) to Air France for moral damages and damages to its reputation.

It also fined Continental 200,000 euros ($265,000) and one of its mechanics, John Taylor, was fined 2,000 euros ($2,650). Taylor was further handed a 15-month suspended prison sentence.

All other defendants, including Taylor's now-retired supervisor Stanley Ford and three French aviation officials, were acquitted.

The verdict exposes Continental to claims that could run to tens of millions of dollars.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40527031/ns/travel/

BS, typical French nonsense
 

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I thought that crash was caused by some debris on the runway. How is that a mechanic's fault?:huh:
 

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French judicial and aviation investigators concluded long ago that a Continental Airlines DC-10 dropped titanium debris onto the runway at Charles de Gaulle airport before the Air France Concorde took off — a metal strip that gashed the supersonic jet's tire and sent rubber pieces flying into the fuel tanks, causing a fire.
Those set to stand trial are: John Taylor, a mechanic from Continental, who officials allege fitted the metal strip to the DC-10; Stanley Ford, a Continental maintenance official; Henri Perrier and Jacques Herubel, both formerly of the Concorde division at Aerospatiale (now part of aerospace company EADS); and Claude Frantzen, a member of France's civil aviation authority.

enri Perrier, Jacques Herubel and Claude Frantzen were responsible for the design, testing and certification of the Concorde.

The charges had said the engineers could have acted much earlier to correct well-known design flaws in the plane.

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A titanium strip allegedly fell off a Continental DC-10 which took off just before the Concorde. Judicial investigators say the strip was improperly installed on the DC-10 engine, prompting the charges against the airline, Ford and Taylor.
This is what I could find. Im a designer of flight controls for military and commercial planes. If something can be easily misinstalled it is a poor design. From what I can find, the piece which fell off was known as a poor design. IMO the people who did not redesign the part, the mechanic, and the superviser responsible for inspecting the mechanic's work are all to blame.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is what I could find. Im a designer of flight controls for military and commercial planes. If something can be easily misinstalled it is a poor design. From what I can find, the piece which fell off was known as a poor design. IMO the people who did not redesign the part, the mechanic, and the superviser responsible for inspecting the mechanic's work are all to blame.
I would think that since there were not many of these flights to begin with, and it was known that a blow out could take down the aircraft, (because this happened before) then it is safe to assume that a FOD walk(Foreign Object Debris) should have been done before each flight took off and landed. Or the tanks and the protection for the tanks should have been reengineered to avoid such a hit. Continental Airlines because it is an American company is the scapegoat for the French Government.
 

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PONTOISE, France — A French court found Continental Airlines and a mechanic at the airline guilty on Monday of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the 2000 Concorde crash that killed 113 people.

The accident led to the supersonic airliner being grounded for good.

Continental pledged to appeal and branded the verdict as "absurd," saying it showed the French authorities' determination to shift the blame from Air France, which operated the jet and was owned by the French government at the time.

The court in the Paris suburb of Pontoise ruled that the Houston-based airline must pay 1.08 million euros ($1.43 million) to Air France for moral damages and damages to its reputation.

It also fined Continental 200,000 euros ($265,000) and one of its mechanics, John Taylor, was fined 2,000 euros ($2,650). Taylor was further handed a 15-month suspended prison sentence.

All other defendants, including Taylor's now-retired supervisor Stanley Ford and three French aviation officials, were acquitted.

The verdict exposes Continental to claims that could run to tens of millions of dollars.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40527031/ns/travel/

BS, typical French nonsense
Ok I will now say all Aircraft Mechanics are under paid, even the union ones. I can't see how anyone could wrench on a plane after that verdit in good coscience, especially one bound for France
 

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The shards on the runway are symptoms. The fuel tank was punctured by the tire debris when the tire blew. This was a very poor aircraft design. I have been flying for my job for over 20 years. I have been on two aircraft that had a tire fail. Neither ended up being a problem but the one that blew on takeoff took precautions in the way of fire truck present on landing.

:cheers:
 

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I would think that since there were not many of these flights to begin with, and it was known that a blow out could take down the aircraft, (because this happened before) then it is safe to assume that a FOD walk(Foreign Object Debris) should have been done before each flight took off and landed. Or the tanks and the protection for the tanks should have been reengineered to avoid such a hit. Continental Airlines because it is an American company is the scapegoat for the French Government.
You are right, the Concord had a poor design, but so did the DC-10. Fixing either issue would have prevented this crash, but not necessarily prevented a future one. I chose to pick on the DC-10 because creating FOD, especially a large chunk of metal is one of the biggest no-nos in the industry. It is also a lot easier to design a panel to be idiot proof and inspect it, than redesign the entire fuel tank system. Further, once the FOD came off the plane it could have created any number of problems for which planes were not designed. For example it could have been blown around by the Concord's engines and punctered another plane or killed an airport worker. At the end of the day the root cause is FOD on the runway.
 
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