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Very impressive build write-up and great pics.

Thanks very much for posting autowiz!

If you don't mind my asking, was it difficult to install the Tremec and position it properly? Were you able to install the tranny with the insulation still installed? I've got one ready to install along with the correct shifter for the C3 Vette and drive shaft but I've been hung up doing the bodywork and such after I suffered a lower back injury at work. My back is pretty all healed up so I'm looking forward to fitting it up behind a 406 Dart setup in my '73 coup.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
So the big thing about converting to a Tremec is fitting the Bellhousing. The Muncie or Super T10 or M22 Rock crusher were all loose transmissions. Right? I mean they had a loose ball bearing on the input shaft and it centered on the pilot bushing. The Tremec in stark contrast is made to precise tolerances and so it is extremely critical for the life of the transmission that it be centered with the crankshaft. Every second an engine is running the crankshaft is always trying to drive it's way to China and so when engine blocks get line bored in the rebuilding/remanufacturing process, the crankshaft always seems to mount a few thousandths lower. And if you have an engine block that has been rebuilt a few times you will likely observe that the offset dowels you will use you will clock downwards so that you can bring that pilot bearing into exact alignment with the input shaft on the Tremec. To achieve this you will use a dial indicator with a magnetic base stuck to the bare mounted flywheel with the bellhousing bolted to the engine. The dial indicator should be reading the inside diameter of the mounting hole where the transmission plugs into. And as you roll the engine you mark all around the bellhousing what the reading are. Then you can see which way is center and how much. And that is the point you will know what offset dowels you will need. This process is needed on ALL old school small/big blocks. LS engines were all designed in the days of the tremec and so they are all largely inside of spec without any special dowels needed.
 

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Premium Member
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So the big thing about converting to a Tremec is fitting the Bellhousing. The Muncie or Super T10 or M22 Rock crusher were all loose transmissions. Right? I mean they had a loose ball bearing on the input shaft and it centered on the pilot bushing. The Tremec in stark contrast is made to precise tolerances and so it is extremely critical for the life of the transmission that it be centered with the crankshaft. Every second an engine is running the crankshaft is always trying to drive it's way to China and so when engine blocks get line bored in the rebuilding/remanufacturing process, the crankshaft always seems to mount a few thousandths lower. And if you have an engine block that has been rebuilt a few times you will likely observe that the offset dowels you will use you will clock downwards so that you can bring that pilot bearing into exact alignment with the input shaft on the Tremec. To achieve this you will use a dial indicator with a magnetic base stuck to the bare mounted flywheel with the bellhousing bolted to the engine. The dial indicator should be reading the inside diameter of the mounting hole where the transmission plugs into. And as you roll the engine you mark all around the bellhousing what the reading are. Then you can see which way is center and how much. And that is the point you will know what offset dowels you will need. This process is needed on ALL old school small/big blocks. LS engines were all designed in the days of the tremec and so they are all largely inside of spec without any special dowels needed.

Thanks for the informative reply. I haven't unboxed the Tremec yet so I'm not sure of the other more technical requirements there are toward installing it properly in the instructions. I'm hoping that because the engine block and bell are new aftermarket pieces and not more than a few years old I might be able to forego the offset dowel routine. However I will do as you suggest and dial in the centers between block and bell because you've peaked my interest in just how off the alignment may possibly be. The block is already on a stand and the bell is just sitting around gathering dust so good to go in that regard.

I'll get on University Youtube for starters and see what's what with those other installation procedures. If there's anything I've learned from restoring cars it's that pre-build planning is critical and even then things always take a whole lot longer with a lot more frustration and cost if you want things to be done right and proper. BUT the final results are so much more rewarding and satisfying when it's time to roll the beast out of the garage and on the road for the first time.

Thanks for the info, it's much appreciated.
 
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