Corvette Forum : DigitalCorvettes.com Corvette Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2007 auto C6. I'm getting a clunk from the differential when I decelerate then accelerate at low speed (15 to 30 mph or so). It is particularly evident around turns. The differential fluid was just replaced at the dealership! Is this a possible u-joint or bushing issue? I also get a clunk shifting into reverse or drive when the car is cold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
I had the same problem when reversing in the morning , I changed the diff fluid myself with the required fluid and fixed it right up...noise gone :thumbsup:

You also have to do figure 8 `s after the fluid change....

The figure 8's are to get the friction modifier additive up into the posi clutch plates to prevent the groan noise when turning
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I have a 2007 auto C6. I'm getting a clunk from the differential when I decelerate then accelerate at low speed (15 to 30 mph or so). It is particularly evident around turns. The differential fluid was just replaced at the dealership! Is this a possible u-joint or bushing issue? I also get a clunk shifting into reverse or drive when the car is cold.
From what you are describing it could be a u-joint. I had one go out in my 08 Chevy pickup that had to change out. One way to find out, get the rear tires off the ground by jacking it up or on a lift. Grab the drive shaft, it shouldn't have alot of play in it from side to side or while turning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,256 Posts
From what you are describing it could be a u-joint. I had one go out in my 08 Chevy pickup that had to change out. One way to find out, get the rear tires off the ground by jacking it up or on a lift. Grab the drive shaft, it shouldn't have alot of play in it from side to side or while turning.
Could be the exhaust bearing located behind the transmission, or maybe those up front, need to be check out by the professionals.:smack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
used differentials

used differentials
ElectronicElectronic limited slip differential systems use speed sensors, anti-lock braking system (ABS) sensors, accelerometers, and microcomputers to electronically monitor wheel slip and vehicle motion. In some systems the computer limits slip by varying the degree of locking in a mechanical LSD; such as Porsche's PSD system, which uses electro-hydraulic control of a mechanical LSD.The Mitsubishi Active Yaw Control (AYC) electronically controlled rear differential uses a conventional open differential with an added planetary gear set to rotate two hollow shafts around the left hand drive shaft, one running at +15% speed, one at -15%. These can be progressively locked up to the left hand drive shaft via a hydraulic clutch pack under CPU control, increasing or decreasing the torque on that wheel in relation to the other. This allows a certain amount of rear wheel "steering" to provide stability control and perform the function of an LSD.Many vehicles use a traction control system to simulate a limited slip differential. With this type of system, if either of the wheels on an axle is rotating unusually faster than the other, the computer will determine how much it is slipping and apply braking to it, slowing the spinning wheel down and thereby increasing torque to the wheel with more traction.
A limited slip differential (LSD) is a type of differential gear arrangement that allows for some difference in angular velocity of the output shafts, but imposes a mechanical bound on the disparity. In an automobile, such limited slip differentials are sometimes used in place of a standard differential, where they convey certain dynamic advantages, at the expense of greater complexity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
used differentialsA limited slip differential (LSD) is a type of differential gear arrangement that allows for some difference in angular velocity of the output shafts, but imposes a mechanical bound on the disparity. In an automobile, such limited slip differentials are sometimes used in place of a standard differential, where they convey certain dynamic advantages, at the expense of greater complexity.
:WTF

Sounds very ... er .. intelligent - but where's any reference to the OP's 'clunk' cause or advice ...
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top