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I wouldn't trust it
i think my Buick Grand National had electric powered brakes. I don't think GM would use something unproven.

I wish someone would give it a try and report back. I have a hydroboost but am reluctant to install it. Too damn many hoses going all over the place.
 

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i think my Buick Grand National had electric powered brakes. I don't think GM would use something unproven.

I wish someone would give it a try and report back. I have a hydroboost but am reluctant to install it. Too damn many hoses going all over the place.
Yes it does, but most remove it and replace it with vac brakes. People are just to lazy to learn about the unit and Properly maintain it.
Eevn the powermaster takes up less room.
 

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Well....would you consider one of these?

Pros/cons????

http://www.abspowerbrake.com/electrichppage.html

This is a power unit you could run and save a ton of room if trying to fit a turbo or tall deck big block in...or not require a power steering pump like a hydrobooster.
Not for a grand, not that I have Hydro now....not worth it....

now outta junkyard?? sure...50 bux and easy....

:D
 

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those powermasters were only used for a couple of years if I'm not mistakien. I've heard many complaint stories about those things (but they were mostly from people who were driving POS 80s caprices and such here, the kind of people who drive low budget cars)
 

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those powermasters were only used for a couple of years if I'm not mistakien. I've heard many complaint stories about those things (but they were mostly from people who were driving POS 80s caprices and such here, the kind of people who drive low budget cars)

Not exactly a scientific opinion. The hydroboost unit was designed for a dually farm truck hauling horse ****. Never seen one as original equipment on any type of performance car. I still wonder about the modulation, engage and release characteristics. Nobody that has retrofitted one has yet to report back how it performs on a track. You want a percise and accurate braking system for road racing. Manual would be ideal but the C3 fixed caliper system requires more volume which means lots of effort.

I don't want high pressure hydraulic hoses running all over my engine compartment especially if i'm gonna run a dry sump system and have at least a dozen oil hoses running all over for that.
 

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I don't think a dry sump is the way to go if you still plan on driving to the track and around town to places that will take awhile.

You'll also need to plan ahead an hour and also need a 250 dollar right angle drill most likely.

I also wonder how long they last before they wear out?

You can't really see my hoses for the HB

 

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Well....would you consider one of these?

Pros/cons????

http://www.abspowerbrake.com/electrichppage.html

This is a power unit you could run and save a ton of room if trying to fit a turbo or tall deck big block in...or not require a power steering pump like a hydrobooster.
A guy at work had a turbo Buick and they failed on him. It caused a lot of damage. He found out afterwards it wasn't an uncommon failure. Granted it was almost 20 years old when it happened, so you can't blame GM.
 

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A guy at work had a turbo Buick and they failed on him. It caused a lot of damage. He found out afterwards it wasn't an uncommon failure. Granted it was almost 20 years old when it happened, so you can't blame GM.
Mine lasted for 21 years before going bad, there are warning signs that the owner has to pay attention to. There is NO panic stops if it does not pressurize, well don't unless you have legs like tree trunks.
 

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Not exactly a scientific opinion. The hydroboost unit was designed for a dually farm truck hauling horse ****. Never seen one as original equipment on any type of performance car. I still wonder about the modulation, engage and release characteristics. Nobody that has retrofitted one has yet to report back how it performs on a track. You want a percise and accurate braking system for road racing. Manual would be ideal but the C3 fixed caliper system requires more volume which means lots of effort.

I don't want high pressure hydraulic hoses running all over my engine compartment especially if i'm gonna run a dry sump system and have at least a dozen oil hoses running all over for that.
Does it always have to be a scientific opinion? :lookinup:

The hydrobooster was developed for brake assist in diesel equipped vehicles since diesels don't have manifold vacuum (or a throttle body)

If you want a precise system with the best modulation and adjustability you can get, get a manual setup w/ 2 masters and a bias bar.

You don't have to prime your dry sump system before running, why should you? Your wet sump will prime itself also. You could kill the ignition and crank the engine to prime it, or use an accumulator w/ an electric valve to prime the engine. There are other cars that have dry sump systems that don't require priming. The Z06 vette is not a good example it, uses a hyvrid system (an in sump pump pumping fluid to an outside reservoir/buffer and then a line running from there back to the pump) those systems have been available for years from barnes and peterson. Simply looks like an oversized wet sump pump with additional fittings. I think the BMW 850 had a similar system back in the 80s
 

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I'll be installing two units in couple of weeks time. I like it for it's simplicity, no vacuum, no hydraulics. It's still way smaller than stock booster w/ MC and HB w/ MC, plus the units I bought have the integrated brake bias adjustment in them... And they are more powerful than the mighty hydroboost I'm running now. :cheers:
 

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Not exactly a scientific opinion. The hydroboost unit was designed for a dually farm truck hauling horse ****. Never seen one as original equipment on any type of performance car.
Actually the "Hydroboost" unit was designed by Bendix back in the late 60's and was standard on the Lincoln and T-Bird with ABS and optional on the big Fords. It was also used on medium duty Chevy pickups. Bendix has built 1000's of them, but has had a lot of problems with this unit (and still does to this day). Having driven cars and trucks with all types of actuation systems, I have to agree that the best pedal feel and modulation is manual brakes with no proportioning valve.
 
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