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Let's take a journey back to the last time Donald Trump went on an extended bender of White House hallucination. The year was 1999. Pets.com stock was trading at $11 per share. Nobody was all that interested in Bill Clinton's birth certificate. More important, the Republican Party's nomination looked ungettable, sure to be captured by George W. Bush. So Trump left the party.

"I really believe the Republicans are just too crazy, right?" he told Tim Russert on Meet the Press. "I mean, just what's going on is just nuts."

For a few months, Trump hashed out a policy agenda. It wasn't much, but it was enough to fill a quickie book: The America We Deserve, published in January 2000. The Trump of 11 years ago sounds a lot like the Trump who has taken over cable TV and the Drudge Report top banner these past few weeks: He's against immigration amnesty. He's worried about terrorism. He's rending his hair over America's economic decline. Oh, and there were a few other things.*
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"We must have universal healthcare," wrote Trump. "I'm a conservative on most issues but a liberal on this one. We should not hear so many stories of families ruined by healthcare expenses."

The goal of health care reform, wrote Trump, should be a system that looks a lot like Canada. "Doctors might be paid less than they are now, as is the case in Canada, but they would be able to treat more patients because of the reduction in their paperwork," he writes.

The Canadian plan also helps Canadians live longer and healthier than Americans. There are fewer medical lawsuits, less loss of labor to sickness, and lower costs to companies paying for the medical care of their employees. If the program were in place in Massachusetts in 1999 it would have reduced administrative costs by $2.5 million. We need, as a nation, to reexamine the single-payer plan, as many individual states are doing.

Today, Trump does not think the Republicans are so crazy. Two new surveys, from Public Policy Polling and Newsmax (which editorially egged him on to run), put him at the top of the GOP's thrilling list of 2012 presidential hopefuls. CNN's poll has Trump capturing much of Mitt Romney's support, even though some in the pundit class think Romney can actually beat President Obama. Pundits know that Trump can't, but they appreciates what he does for their traffic and clickthrough rate.

Romney's biggest current problem with the GOP base, of course, is his stewardship of Massachusetts's market-based universal health care law. So how has Trump avoided any damaging fallout from his single-payer flirtation? Well, the first answer is that maybe he won't. It's a nice, fat target if he surprises everyone and gets into the race. The second answer is that he's avoided conservative opprobrium because Trump is not quite a conservative, in the sense that conservatives would like to think their politicians are. He's an emissary of screw-the-experts, everything-is-broken populism. He's found an audience with Republicans because all of the voters who believe in this have, maybe temporarily, joined Team Red.

This is not necessarily a happy thought for Republicans. Republicans, like Democrats, like to think they have principles. They do not, as a general rule—I may be going out on a limb here—believe in a government-run health care system. They believe in low taxes. They ask their candidates to sign all sorts of pledges, Norquistian and otherwise, affirming their principled stance. They've studied their Hayek and their Russell Kirk.

The thing is, a lot of voters make up their minds while they're blind with rage. And the targets of their rage change from year to year. That's why Trump's 2000 platform is instructive. He was bidding to lead the Reform Party, which grew out of Ross Perot's two presidential bids, which were themselves inspired by the first real backlash to the national debt. The Reform Party's platform opposed any tax cuts before the deficit had been eliminated; excess revenue should be spent on debt payment, not tax cuts.

That was more or less the vintage 2000 Trump position on taxes, sold with a unique combination of angst and bravado. "When was the last time you heard a major politician warning of economic downturn?" he wrote. "It's just not in the vocabulary of any public figure. Except mine."

In The America We Deserve, Trump proposed a one-time 14.25 percent tax on individuals and trusts "with a net worth of over $10 million." He predicted that it would raise $5.7 trillion, "which we would use to pay off the national debt" and pay for Social Security. (The first part of this seems quaint now.)

"By imposing a one-time 14.25 percent net-worth tax on the richest individuals and trusts," he explained, "we can put America on sound financial footing for the next century." Like basically every other Trump idea, this one came with a story of epiphany and self-sacrifice. "The plan would cost me $700 million personally in the short term, but it would be worth it."

This is what a swath of people were angry about or panicked about in 1999. They were worried about campaign finance reform, so Trump sided with them. "If I were drawing a political cartoon to represent the situation," he wrote, while not actually drawing the cartoon, "it would include a very large guy with a huge bag of money. On that bag would be written one word: soft. Soft money is the bane of the current system and we need to get rid of it."

How far can this schtick take you? In 2000, not very far. That was when a lonely nation cried out for blandness, and demanded candidates with smart ideas of how to spend budget surpluses. There was none of the anger and immediacy that there was in 1992 or 2010. And Trump's success, such as it is, is coming because he will say anything that fed-up people are thinking.

Here's an example that's more recent than his book. In 2008, after George W. Bush lost, Trump made a critique of the Iraq war predicated on the idea that Bush was a lousy president. "He'd go into a country," said Trump, "attack Iraq, which had nothing to do with the World Trade Center, and just do it because he wanted to do it." When he said that, that's what people thought about Bush and Iraq.

Smash-cut to this month, when Trump sat down with the Wall Street Journal for one of many interviews with baffled reporters. He went at Iraq from another direction. "I always heard that when we went into Iraq," he said, "we went in for the oil. I said, 'Eh, that sounds smart.' "

Different rationales, different solutions different times—the only thing connecting them is the degree of anger out there in that 18 percent or so of the country that hates and mistrusts both parties, and for the moment is still with the GOP. They like successful businessmen, or they at least like people who can sell themselves that way. They hate anything that sounds like political double-talk. They think Obama is wrecking the country. They can be sold snake oil, as long as the person selling it is brimming with confidence about the recipe. Enter, once again, Donald Trump.

http://www.slate.com/id/2291263/
 

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He's only doing this to pump ratings for his show. He reminds me of Jimmy James on News Radio who only ran for attention to get dates. This has about that feel.

Evidence: 'Tune into my show where I will make the announcement.'

:rolleyes:
 

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Sounds like a Regan to me. ;)
 

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Thats gona leave a mark :lookinup:

If Rand Paul and the Donald were to hook up, Then what?:surprised
Then Obama wins in a landslide. Pubs need to get a moderate in the WH. Or at the very least, one who fakes it well enough during the campaign, but still appeals to the fringe base during primaries. That's the problem with presidential candedates. The election is won in the primaries by whomever selects the most moderate candidate, but neither side is good at doing that consistently.
 

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We had moderate... we need a Republican (or Ind.). Listen to Allen West. Hear how he speaks, about everything. That's what we need.

We as a country, must acquire the ability to say, NO.
 

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We had moderate... we need a Republican (or Ind.). Listen to Allen West. Hear how he speaks, about everything. That's what we need.

We as a country, must acquire the ability to say, NO.
Yeah, because you say so, right? pfft :rolleyes:
 

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That's exactly right.
 

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Aw jeez... No surprise the conservatives like this guy.

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Donald Trump unleashed more withering scorn for President Obama Thursday - but insisted it had nothing to do with race because he has a "great relationship with the blacks."

Trump said he was dismayed by Obama's strong support within the African-American community.

"I know many Obama supporters," Trump said on Albany's Talk 1300 radio. "I have a great relationship with the blacks but unfortunately the \[poll\] numbers that you cite are very, very frightening numbers."

Trump also said that he loves the Tea Party and would want to run for President on the Republican ticket, but had unabashed praise for newly-elected Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

"I think he is doing terrific job, setting a great example. He's doing it with style and with class and I'm very proud of him."

"I think he is doing a great job," Trump added.

Trump's threat of a presidential run has been largely built around him loudly trumpeting discredited theories about Obama's origins, but he appears to be trying to broaden his message.

"I look at the country. It's never been worse. It's run at a level that I've never seen anything like it. This is Jimmy Carter-esqe. I'm very seriously considering \[running\] and I'll make my decision sometime prior to June," he said.

Trump said he was looking forward to speaking at a Tea Party rally in Florida this weekend and said the rise of the group was a great thing for America.

"I'm big fan of the Tea Party because I really think they've provided a great service. It made people understand what is going on. It made people open their eyes," he said.

Trump tamped down reports that he would crassly use the finale of his TV show, "Celebrity Apprentice," to announce whether he would run - saying that it would violate election laws.

But his office later put out a statement hinting that he may use his show as a platform of sorts.

"On the May 22nd Season Finale of Celebrity Apprentice, Mr. Trump may announce the time and place of a press conference at which time he will make a statement as to whether or not he will run for President of the United States," the statement read.

The White House has dismissed the noise about a Trump candidacy as a "sideshow," and said he had "zero chance" of winning.

Trump insists he is Obama's worst nightmare.

"The one person they don't want to run against is me because I tell it like it is," he said.

Still, Trump continues to trumpet debunked "birther" theories about Obama being born in Kenya.

"Why doesn't he give his birth certificate? Why doesn't he show it. Why are there no records in the hospital, why does his grandmother say he was born in Kenya," he said.

Obama has made public a certificate saying he was born in a Hawaii hospital and has pointed to newspaper announcements of his birth in Honolulu newspapers as proof he was born there.

Numerous "birther" blogs have repeated the claim that Obama's grandmother said he was born in Kenya, but she says she has never said that.



Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/pol...hip_with_blacks_praises_go.html#ixzz1JitGxh3b
 

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Obama has made public a certificate saying he was born in a Hawaii hospital and has pointed to newspaper announcements of his birth in Honolulu newspapers as proof he was born there.
But no birth certificate... :laughing:
 

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Then Obama wins in a landslide. Pubs need to get a moderate in the WH. Or at the very least, one who fakes it well enough during the campaign, but still appeals to the fringe base during primaries. That's the problem with presidential candedates. The election is won in the primaries by whomever selects the most moderate candidate, but neither side is good at doing that consistently.
I am in lockstep with you on this one, sir. You've all heard me say it many times - the middle elects the presidents in this country and the middle does not like extremists. They either have to be moderate - like, say, Clinton, or pretend to be moderate like Obama. Reagan? A bit of an anomaly. He was very conservative, but his skills at speaking made him sound very moderate and full of common sense. The political world was ready for his type after Carter. The Republicans need to get over the purity tests for their candidates and elect the man or woman who has the best chance to win. I may change my mind, but at this point, I still think it's Romney.
 

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purity tests for their candidates
:thumbsup:

Yeah who cares who he did or where he did it

He's a Solid business man and a Hell of a lot better choice than these Career Politicians

Also Expect less from Obama if he is re-elected

because it will be his second term

And we cant afford Less right now or anytime for that matter

We Drastic change in this country

Not just talk about change like Obama has


Obama = Muslim :nuts:
 

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He's a Solid business man and a Hell of a lot better choice than these Career Politicians
If by 'solid' you mean the consistency of the **** he has pulled time and again. Bankrupt several times over, accused and under litigation from former business partners for theft by swindle, racist, up to his armpits in the gambling industry, and failed to produce the jobs & entertainment center he promised as part of a deal to get some public (that's tax dollars) backing.

Oh yeah. Solid. :thumbsup:
 

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If by 'solid' you mean the consistency of the **** he has pulled time and again. Bankrupt several times over, accused and under litigation from former business partners for theft by swindle, racist, up to his armpits in the gambling industry, and failed to produce the jobs & entertainment center he promised as part of a deal to get some public (that's tax dollars) backing.

Oh yeah. Solid. :thumbsup:
Must suck to be so scared all the time.
 

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I remember when Pat Paulson used to run every year, and announce he was running on Laugh In.
That was about the time candidate Nixon went on laugh-in and said "Sock it to me". He may have been the most un-funny person to ever sit in the White House. :laughing:
 

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I remember when Pat Paulson used to run every year, and announce he was running on Laugh In.
That was about the time candidate Nixon went on laugh-in and said "Sock it to me". He may have been the most un-funny person to ever sit in the White House. :laughing:
You guys are old! I had to Google Pat Paulson. :laughing:
 
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