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OK I have a 3/8 dia., .032 wall, formed SS fuel line for my car. I would like to put a fuel filter in the middle of it. This is for a EFI setup so I want all hard lines. So I cut the tube, get out my flaring tool and the anvil just pushes the tube out of the clamp bar. It won't even try to flare it at all.

I can understand that the tube was "worked" when formed, but I am trying to do this in a straight section. Do I have to go to the more ductile steel tube? Any suggestions?
 

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Are you doing 45 or 37 degree flares? Also, don't use a tubing cutter to cut teh tubing, use a cut off wheel and then use a file to work the cut to make it straight. I use the clamping block as a guide for filing it straight.

If it keeps pushin the tube out of the clamping block, try to put a bit of tape aroudn the tuve to povide more bite. Are you doing single or double flares??
 

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OK I have a 3/8 dia., .032 wall, formed SS fuel line for my car. I would like to put a fuel filter in the middle of it. This is for a EFI setup so I want all hard lines. So I cut the tube, get out my flaring tool and the anvil just pushes the tube out of the clamp bar. It won't even try to flare it at all.

I can understand that the tube was "worked" when formed, but I am trying to do this in a straight section. Do I have to go to the more ductile steel tube? Any suggestions?
I had the same problem, the flaring tool is too weak....

I clamped the SS line using the clamp of the flaring tool kit and a vice, then hit the anvil with a hammer until the end of the line was flared a little .... then I used the flaring tool as it's supposed to be used, once you have the flare started it won't push the line off anymore... stainless tubing is a bi!ch to flare....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Are you doing 45 or 37 degree flares? Also, don't use a tubing cutter to cut teh tubing, use a cut off wheel and then use a file to work the cut to make it straight. I use the clamping block as a guide for filing it straight.

If it keeps pushin the tube out of the clamping block, try to put a bit of tape aroudn the tuve to povide more bite. Are you doing single or double flares??
Marck, Maybe the flare tool is part of the problem. It states that it is "designed to double flare thin wall steel tube.....". I don't know if my information is correct but isn't it only brake lines that require a double flare? Also the tool has no indication of the flare angle but the cone angle of the anvil is 90 degrees.
 

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I have found that the quality of the flare is in direct proportion to the quality of the flaring tool used.:thumbsup:
 

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Marck, Maybe the flare tool is part of the problem. It states that it is "designed to double flare thin wall steel tube.....". I don't know if my information is correct but isn't it only brake lines that require a double flare? Also the tool has no indication of the flare angle but the cone angle of the anvil is 90 degrees.

double flaring is used on non seamless tubing, the otuwide is then smooth so the double flare turns it inside out so the outsdie with no seam provides the sealing surface.
 

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Since you are installing a FI fuel filter, I assume you will be using -an or 37° flares.

You really need a flaring tip on the tool that is a "roller type" vs just a cone. It puts a lot less pushing force on the tube itself.

If you can, try your local small airport, with a repair shop or even a hydraulic supply (hydraulics use 37° too) and take the lines there if possible. Might be less aggrivating and faster in the long run.:D
 

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That silly chebby powered boat required a double flared 3/8 steel line from pump to carb, BIA/USCG requirements.....the cheeeeep set John had didn't dothe job...I have a much better set, and even then had to clamp the grip bar in the vice to get enough ON the tubing, tighten down the wing nutz, and then put the double flaring dies on it, then of course the single....

I can do that stainless also, but cheeep tools will NOT do it...we tried, and cryed.....

:devil: :cheers: :WTF
 

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You need a 37 degree clamp block also. Anyway, if you are serious about doing stainless you'll need a quality flare tool. Some of the mil spec tools like the imperial eastman 400f will do double flares and have a burnishing cone face. They do have a cheaper model for around 200$ or so that will do ginle flares, it looks just like the 400F and is also a high quality tool. I think newman tools sells these as does aircraftspruce.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You need a 37 degree clamp block also. Anyway, if you are serious about doing stainless you'll need a quality flare tool. Some of the mil spec tools like the imperial eastman 400f will do double flares and have a burnishing cone face. They do have a cheaper model for around 200$ or so that will do ginle flares, it looks just like the 400F and is also a high quality tool. I think newman tools sells these as does aircraftspruce.
So I need 37 degree, double flares for fuel line?
 

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depends on the components you're using, if it's AN/JIC then YES

If it's normal 45 inverted flare, then use that, for metric bubbles you need even a different tool, same for the o ring ones w/ the "collar" crimped into the pipi (don't know what that's called) check out eastman for a plethora of nice tools :D
 

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can he use an Aeroquip tube nut and tube sleeve?? might be less work and expense
...redvetracr
 

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the tube nut and sleeve are part of the 37 degree flare system, the nut presses against the sleeve, the sleeve has a 37 degree taper to back up the flare itself. So, first you slide the nut over the tubing, then the sleeve 9both facint in the right direction of course) and then you make the flare. When you tighten the nut, the nut presses against the sleeve and the sleeve against the flare. This reduces the deforming of the tube itself and improves the seal.
 

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.... check out eastman for a plethora of nice tools :D
I got mine done (no leaks...:D ) with a Snap-On flare/double flare kit that I borrowed from the local Dodge head mechanic and buddy.

Pretty expensive to buy :surprised if it's for a one time use... any chance there might be a tool rental store near by?

kdlp
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Why don't you post a pic or a link to your fuel filter so everyone is on the same page.:D
Good idea. I wish I understood this stuff better. Maybe this is a good opportunity. I also included a picture of the fitting on my condenser that I PM'd you about. You can see how close to the flange on the core support this is. I thought this might be a "fitting" thread to put the condenser picture in:laughing:

To add to my confusion, included is an in-tank C4 pump fitting that looks like a regular hose barb! Whats up with that? Not pictured, but another variation is the tube fittings used on modern in-tank pumps with some kind of collet fitting and plastic high pressure lines.





 

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the filter is indeed a 37 deg. an flare, looks like -6

The fuel fillter plate is indeed set up for a hose barb.
 

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Fuel filter

I used to have a industrial quality flaring set with dies for hydraulic (JIC 37°), but it walked and I didn't want to spend the big bucks again since I don't do any hydraulics anymore.
Here is a pic of a filter installed just like yours



I used a regular 45° fairly cheap flaring tool and just didn't tighten it down all the way when flaring. Just guessed at the 37°. Used 3/8 brake line and made only a single flare. Have used annealed ss with the same reults. Have done many like this with absolutely no problems. JIC fittings with the proper steel tubing and a single flare have a working pressure up around 4000 psi with spikes many times that. So for a carb using a max of 7 psi or fuel injection using a max of 80 psi this type of seal is serious overkill. Even aluminum -an is rated a litlle below 2000 psi.

Here is a pic of the 2 types of common fittings.

JIC nut and sleeve, single flare using a cheapo 45° flare tool.



OEM fuel fittings 45° double flare



The last JIC nuts and sleeves, I think were 5 bucks for 6 nuts and sleeves. Much cheaper than alum -an.
Pump

With the tank pump you could silver solder/braze a 37° or 45° fitting onto the pressure tube and go with a fuel rating hose to the frame/hardline. That would allow you to use a much better quality flex fuel line there.

Remember auto fuel lines are realistically very low pressure.

Condenser
That looks tight. If you can't find any fitting that would work in the links I sent you, then you have 2 other optons I'm aware of.
Get an alum ac elbow with the correct type output style and tig it to the condenser.
Or cut a hole thru the side of the core support and wheel well and plumb it that way, Remember some C3s did that behind the wheel and used a cover plate. This might be the easiest.

BTW, here is my favorite fuel filter



:D
 

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Hey that's a kinsler fuel filter, I have the gray one but mine didn't come with the holding bracket :rolling: I feel cheated :smack
 
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