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Discussion Starter #1
So I completely cleaned the floorboards of my car in the past 3 days, scrubbed them clean. I have now, by removing the glue,jute,carpet,dirt,old beer,oil and grime found a hole, dircetly under the gas pedal, at the intersection of the floorboards and tunnel, about the size of a half dollar.The fiberglass literally fell through.:WTF (careful kids, oil leaks can kill!). The previous owners POS crate motor leaked all over the damn place. I have since tossed it in the trash. I also have a "weak" spot, coming from the hole, about an inch wide and 4 inches log, which has the feeling of wet cardboard. It is solid, but spongy if I press on it. Should I cut the weak spot out? Or leave it and glass over all of it, also whats the best way to fix the hole (strongest fiberglass option) ? Thanks in advance!!
 

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Fiberglass matte (not cloth) and polyester resin. The panels on your 71 are press molded polyester with the exceptioin of the rear fender. They are SMC.

:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Fiberglass matte (not cloth) and polyester resin. The panels on your 71 are press molded polyester with the exceptioin of the rear fender. They are SMC.

:thumbsup:

I guess that was one of by biggest questions. The only one remaining is, should I remove the oil soaked section or try and leech the oil out of it and use the matte over it? Thanks guys, you both were a huge help!!:D
 

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One of the biggest misconceptions about composites is SMC. Yes it's been used since the 60's in Corvettes starting on various parts and then completely and is still used today, classed as SMC, although the chemistry changes virtually every year. Don't get hung up on that.
Does it matter that it's SMC, absolutely not.
The strongest resin and the resin with the most adhesion for all repairs is epoxy, doesn't matter if you are repairing polyester glass, vinylester glass or epoxy glass.
Epoxy roughly has 10 times the adhesion (which you really want) of polyester and least double the strength as well as more elasticity and much less shrinkage. No downside.

As far as the glass, cloth is stronger than mat. I keep various of both.
The biggest problem with novices, is that when using resin and mat, novices almost always have their finished product far too resin rich, reducing final strength. Without at least vacuum bagging and/or a lot of experience, that is almost always the case. Using cloth it is much harder to get a poor ratio, so the novice will usually have a much stronger repair.

The soft glass you have on the floorboard that feels like cardboard is similar to the battery box bottom I posted a pic of. The glass itself is still good, just lacking resin.
Clean it as best you can with lacquer thinner and as a final clean, you can spray it heavily with "starter fluid" and let it drip thru with all the dirt and contamination.
Then you can mix a small amount of resin to paint and saturate the loose area and when this hardens and locks in, grind with 30 grit to roughen and straighten. Then coat with multiple layers of finer glass and resin. If it sets up between layers, you must regrind for adhesion purposes. Best to do at least one final coat on the underneath surface. When done glassing smooth and paint like the regular body panels.

I wouldn't try to analyze this too deeply to save 10 bucks.

BTW, I've repaired transoms on ocean going cigarettes with 235hp outboards hanging on them, so this is a minor repair, but same method.

Loads of info with google.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The soft glass you have on the floorboard that feels like cardboard is similar to the battery box bottom I posted a pic of. The glass itself is still good, just lacking resin.
Clean it as best you can with lacquer thinner and as a final clean, you can spray it heavily with "starter fluid" and let it drip thru with all the dirt and contamination.
Then you can mix a small amount of resin to paint and saturate the loose area and when this hardens and locks in, grind with 30 grit to roughen and straighten. Then coat with multiple layers of finer glass and resin. If it sets up between layers, you must regrind for adhesion purposes. Best to do at least one final coat on the underneath surface. When done glassing smooth and paint like the regular body panels.

I wouldn't try to analyze this too deeply to save 10 bucks.
Makes sense, the oil just broke down the bond. Id feel more comfortable leaving whats there and try to clean it out. Worse case I screw it up and cut it back out, and I dont think im that bad.

Just curious, what makes Starter fluid a key cleaning ingredient?

Not really looking to pinch pennies at this point, after all, this is a Corvette, and Ive grown accustomed to dumping money into it!! :D
 
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