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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone here changed the front bearings on their C3? If so please inform on how to and if any special tools required?
 

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Corvette7579 said:
Has anyone here changed the front bearings on their C3? If so please inform on how to and if any special tools required?
Nope. Just a punch to knock out the races, grease to repack, and a wrench to loosen and tighten the nut, pliers to remove and replace the cotter pin and a small hammer (or press) to set the seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I had taken the bearing off on one side and just repacked the thing and put it back but I thought I would ask since I had a whole set of bearings for the two front ones. Glad there is no special tools needed. Wanna change the front crossover and or just the hoses. If I can get just the two hoses off and put the new ones without any trouble then I will leave the old crossover line on there. Seems the guy before me had rounded off the head on one of them. Just hope I can get them off but I bought some new line wrenches to that and thought just as soon do that while I am changing the bearings and change the rotors I have while I am at it. Is that a full restore, body off you have there? It is a nice looking Corvette you have. Thanks for the thread.
 

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Corvette7579 said:
Is that a full restore, body off you have there? It is a nice looking Corvette you have. Thanks for the thread.
Thanks! :thumbsup: The blue coupe we have had since I was 29 years old in good ol' 1980. I have rebuilt it twice the last just last summer with a new interior and paint. Hope to rebuild the engine this year. The vert I bought last year in New Hampshire and drove it back to New Mexico. Long story about the vert, but suffice it to say, the coupe (supposedly :D) belongs to my wife now.:laughing:

If that black baby is yours you have a pretty sweet ride you ownself, I like the wheels:thumbsup:
 

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Working on the front wheel bearings isn't a bad job. I would check the rotor runout since you're already there. Are the rotors still rivited to the hubs?

Here is a front rotor that I am removing the studs on to replace the rotor.




Here is the hub



Here I have the new rotor bolted and dialed in for under .002" runout.





Finished Job


Gary
 

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how much benefit would drilled and slotted rotors provide? What would be the price on a full set?
 

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For a street car nothing but looks. A properly setup brake system, bearing endplay, and rotor runour set to blueprint spec will be all you need to throw you through the windshield. Save your money for what you really need.

The rotors in the picture are my on my 72 vette, they are USA rotors and I have used import as well there's not much difference anymore. They both had runout in them that needed to be corrected.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the pics of the rotors. The rivets are still in there I am sure. Will those have to be drilled out and repressed? And if so will I need the assistance of a machine shop or just a parts house? The rotors I bought did not come with new studs or new rivets. There is only three parts to the bearing replacement? Because that is all that came with the kit. Do you have to use an instrument to check "runout"? Also, I do not have any solvent . Is there a solvent substitute I can use instead? I had play in the tire on one side and that is what got me going on the bearings. And after inspecting them, the grease was like pitch black. I repacked the bearing behind the adjustment nut and took the play outta the wheel and put it back. Then I was thinking the bearing might be bad so I best just change the bearing behind the adjustment nut. Or should I change the whole set? :bang
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well RJent, they are both mine and this home I live in. The 75 is a 4 speed and I drive it seldom because of my ankle problem that hurts like hell when shifting too much, so I responded to the problem with another purchase. Kinda took a while to get used to the automatic because all I ever had were 4 speed Stingray's. But she is my Black Baby and much time and effort has gone into her. That is what the ogglers want. Well, I say go get your own. Do like I did and feel the experience first hand. And do not throw those old clothes out also, you just might need them to finish the restoration unless you wanna change your whole wardrobe. Get er Done! The only thing I wish is that I woulda left it the way it was when I got it other than changing the brakes but if you own one you know that is nearly impossible. They always need something. Even when they are done. They are like aircraft, constantly needing attention. I suggest to those new owners that if you are not willing to do some mechanic work yourself to not buy one. Unless you have unlimited income and have a mechanic hired full time. They are like Tinker Toys. Tinker and drive a bit, Tinker and drive some more. Ah yes the ownership of the C3 Corvette. Thanks for the compliment. I have two sets of rims for her. A set of Wires and some Honey Comb rims also. The humidity here is simply hell on anything whether it be chrome or any surface. Keep thinking environmentally controlled garage and have yet to do that. Oh one day. Thanks. :cool: :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Isejlowe, do not waste your time with the slotted rotors. No need for that. Trust me. Other than eye candy for street application. Unless you are gonna road race or drag race I see no evident need for them. I was gonna do that but had so many threads about it that I came to the understanding that they were all right and save my money for other things. Just like tires and rims. I am staying with 15's for now. Until I find the ones I like in a 20, that is after I do the paint, then the interior. It never ends. Even after the fat lady sings. ;) :thumbsup:
 

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To replace front rotors do as I did in the picture, drill,chisel, and punch out the rivet body. A lot will say to use the lug nuts to hold the rotor on and that will work but the runout will change everytime you remove the wheel. I think it's a very poor job. You don;t need to re-rivet the rotors unless you are going for NCRS points. I care about points about as much as I do the Arabs and oil companies, so I tap the rivet holes 3/8-24 and then countesink the rotor rivet holes and use socket flat heads screws to hold the rotor on. Use a 1" dial indicator and mag base with C clamp to check the runout. You want it under .002"- the closer to .000" the better. With the rotor bolted on the runout won't change when you remove a tire. If you follow this procedure for both the front and rear rotors you will have a much better job then most of the shop brake jobs.

Gary
 

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Gary you should tell the guys how to set up wheel bearings. Most just tighten and back off to the nearest hole. Guys remember there are two 2 holes in each spindle and rather then back off look for the second hole.
 

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Someone else told me Strider that I needed to put a torgue wrench set at 12 lbs and tighten the nut then back it out and hand tighten to the nearest hole in the spindle. Said it would push the old grease and thing out front of the bearing. I just wanna do these right. Cheaper than new spindles if done wrong .
 

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Corvette7579 said:
Someone else told me Strider that I needed to put a torgue wrench set at 12 lbs and tighten the nut then back it out and hand tighten to the nearest hole in the spindle. Said it would push the old grease and thing out front of the bearing. I just wanna do these right. Cheaper than new spindles if done wrong .
Gary knows this better then I do but here goes.
You just about have it right. Tighten the bearing to say 20-30 foot pounds while spinning in the direction of rotation, back off and do this a few times to get the bearing seated and then hand tighten with fingers only untill you feel the point of zero clearance and then put the cotter pin in. If you need to back up more then 1/24th of the turn dress the washer on a piece of emery paper.
Remember there are always 2 cotter pin holes, if one doesn't line up the second one might.
Again whatever Gary recommends is better.:thumbsup:
You want only about .001 clearance.
Just some trivia
The threads are 20 threads per inch, two cotter pin holes and 6 notches on the castle nut so that means the cotter pin can be installed every twelveth turn and 1/20/12= 0.0041 inch
So each one-twelveth turn of the nut, which is based on how far you can advance or backoff the nut and insert the ccotter pin will loosen or tighten the clearance .004 and specs range from .000-.007 You want the tighter .001.
I am just spouting nonsense, wait for Gary.
 

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Hi Guys, Norval is certainly extremely qualified to answer this post and has done so.

I've adjusted frotn bearings either of 2 ways. One is to tighten the nut while spinning the wheel forward. I taek out the endplay in the bearings and seat to seat them. Then back off and finger tight to the first hole and check endplay. I don;t use a torque wrench to check rotation on these. If they feel too loose then adjust to the next flat and test.

The better way is similar to this only you use a dial indicator so you know what you're feeling. .001 endplay does not offer a lot movement but the wheel should spin without any binding. Most shops set them like I first said and they'll run ok most of the time.facing the nt is the trick to getting a stubborn spindle setup. I do them on a surface grinder but using 180-240 emery on flat stock or even glass will work. Have a micrometer handy and check the nut as you work to gauge the thickness.

If you get the rotors dialed in and runout under the .002" as I recommended and the endplay between .001-.003" you'll be fine. For comparision, I set the rear bearings to .0015-.002 but those are done with only light spindle oil until I get them correctly shimmed then I'll grease them and install. The rears are more involved but the principal is the same,go for the .001-.002 endplay and runout under .002" and the brake system should work great.

Gary
 
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