Corvette Forum : DigitalCorvettes.com Corvette Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
31,366 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
:lookinup:

Thirty-five years ago, Dale G. Bridenbaugh and two of his colleagues at General Electric resigned from their jobs after becoming increasingly convinced that the nuclear reactor design they were reviewing -- the Mark 1 -- was so flawed it could lead to a devastating accident.

Questions persisted for decades about the ability of the Mark 1 to handle the immense pressures that would result if the reactor lost cooling power, and today that design is being put to the ultimate test in Japan. Five of the six reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, which has been wracked since Friday's earthquake with explosions and radiation leaks, are Mark 1s.

"The problems we identified in 1975 were that, in doing the design of the containment, they did not take into account the dynamic loads that could be experienced with a loss of coolant," Bridenbaugh told ABC News in an interview. "The impact loads the containment would receive by this very rapid release of energy could tear the containment apart and create an uncontrolled release."

The situation on the ground at the Fukushima Daiichi plant is so fluid, and the details of what is unfolding are so murky, that it may be days or even weeks before anyone knows how the Mark 1 containment system performed in the face of a devastating combination of natural disasters.

But the ability of the containment to withstand the events that have cascaded from what nuclear experts call a "station blackout" -- where the loss of power has crippled the reactor's cooling system -- will be a crucial question as policy makers re-examine the safety issues that surround nuclear power, and specifically the continued use of what is now one of the oldest types of nuclear reactors still operating.

GE told ABC News the reactors have "a proven track record of performing reliably and safely for more than 40 years" and "performed as designed," even after the shock of a 9.0 earthquake.

Still, concerns about the Mark 1 design have resurfaced occasionally in the years since Bridenbaugh came forward. In 1986, for instance, Harold Denton, then the director of NRC's Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, spoke critically about the design during an industry conference.

"I don't have the same warm feeling about GE containment that I do about the larger dry containments,'' he said, according to a report at the time that was referenced Tuesday in The Washington Post.

"There is a wide spectrum of ability to cope with severe accidents at GE plants,'' Denton said. "And I urge you to think seriously about the ability to cope with such an event if it occurred at your plant.''

Read continues in link...

http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/fukus...-design-caused-ge-scientist/story?id=13141287
 

·
Employee of the Year
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
That is all very disturbing. I think there is way more to the whole nuclear story in Japan that we, & most especially the average Japanese citizen, do not know. Time for the leader of Japan pull the trigger & entomb the whole thing. Obviously this will be very time consuming & difficult to do not to mention lethal. This will only raise gas prices even more...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,914 Posts
What is it about women that makes you turn in to such a douche bag ? Why could you not simply put forth in your own words, why you disagree with her.

You're ****ing goofy, dude.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,109 Posts




The power plant in Fukushima has nothing to do with gas prices and...... it never will...

Not even if it goes supernova....:rolleyes:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,109 Posts
My left gonad will raise gas prices before that nuke plant disaster will.



That's about the stupidest thing I have heard (IMHO) in this forum since preachers revelations to rising oil barrel prices on the global market linked to deep water drilling permits for .05 of the world's oil supply.... in his Fookin Twenty....... fear mongering threads that are duplicate to the ones we already discussed 20 more times in 20 more threads since 2006(IMHO)

:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,914 Posts

·
Employee of the Year
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
Of course this will affect petroleum prices. Lots of gasoline/diesel will be used during the rebuilding of the country. Now everyone will be very leery of nuclear power which then leaves other sources for power generation. Other than wind or solar power, just about every other fuel is carbon based.
 

·
Employee of the Year
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
My left gonad will raise gas prices before that nuke plant disaster will.



That's about the stupidest thing I have heard (IMHO) in this forum since preachers revelations to rising oil barrel prices on the global market linked to deep water drilling permits for .05 of the world's oil supply.... in his Fookin Twenty....... fear mongering threads that are duplicate to the ones we already discussed 20 more times in 20 more threads since 2006(IMHO)

:rolleyes:
Absolutely incredible:rolleyes:

You show me your grade in organic chemistry & I'll show you my A and my advanced chemistry courses....

Not the easiet to read but plenty informative - source http://www.eia.doe.gov/cabs/Japan/Profile.html

Japan Country Analysis Briefs
Quick Facts

Energy Overview
Proven Oil Reserves (January 1, 2010E) 44 million barrels
Oil Production (2009E) 132,660 barrels per day, of which 5,330 barrels per day were crude oil.
Oil Consumption (2009E) 4.4 million barrels per day
Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (2010E) 4.6 million barrels per day
Proven Natural Gas Reserves (January 1, 2010E) 738 billion cubic feet
Natural Gas Production (2009E) 125 billion cubic feet
Natural Gas Consumption (2009E) 3,343 billion cubic feet
Recoverable Coal Reserves (2009E) 355 million short tons
Coal Production (2009) None
Coal Consumption (2009E) 204 million short tons
Electricity Installed Capacity (2007E) 279 gigawatts
Electricity Production (2008E) 1,058 billion kilowatt hours
Electricity Consumption (2008E) 1007 billion kilowatt hours
Total Energy Consumption (2007E) 22.5 quadrillion Btus*, of which Oil (45%), Coal (22%), Natural Gas (18%), Nuclear (11%), Hydroelectricity (3%), Other Renewables (1%)
Total Per Capita Energy Consumption (2007E) 176 million Btus
Energy Intensity (2007E) 5,559 Btu per $2005-PPP**

Environmental Overview
Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions (2008E) 1,214.2 million metric tons, of which Oil (53%), Coal (34%), Natural Gas (13%)
Per-Capita, Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions ((Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) 2008E) 9.5 metric tons
Carbon Dioxide Intensity (2008E) 0.26 Metric tons per thousand $2005-PPP**
Environmental Issues air pollution from power plant emissions results in acid rain; acidification of lakes and reservoirs degrading water quality and threatening aquatic life; Japan is one of the largest consumers of fish and tropical timber, contributing to the depletion of these resources in Asia and elsewhere
Major Environmental Agreements party to: Antarctic-Environmental Protocol, Antarctic-Marine Living Resources, Antarctic Seals, Antarctic Treaty, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Environmental Modification, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Marine Dumping, Ozone Layer Protection, Ship Pollution, Tropical Timber 83, Tropical Timber 94, Wetlands, Whaling

Oil and Gas Industry
Organization The Japanese government began breaking up former state-owned enterprise Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC) in 2001. Japans oil and natural gas sectors are open to foreign involvement, although the government still plays a small role in the industry.
Major Refineries (capacity, bbl/d)(2010E) Cosmo Oil (Chiba - 228,000; Sakai - 76,000; Sakaide - 114,000; Yokkaichi - 147,250); Fuji Oil (Sodegaura - 192,000); Idemitsu Kosen (Aichi - 152,000; Chiba - 209,000; Yamaguchi - 114,000; Hokkaido - 133,000); Japan Energy (Okoyama - 194,940); Kashima Oil (Ibaragi - 180,500); Kyokuto Petroleum (Chiba) 171,500); Nansei (Okinawa - 100,000); Nippon Oil (Negishi - 340,000; Muroran - 190,000; Oita - 160,000; Mizushima  250,000; Sendai - 145,000; Osaka - 115,000; Yamaguchi - 127,000); Okinawa Oil (Okinawa - 100,000); Seibu Oil (Yamaguchi - 111,000); Showa Co. (Yokkaichi - 193,000); Taiyo Oil (Ehime - 120,000); Toa Oil (Kawasaki - 65,000; Kawasaki - 110,000) Tonen General (Kawasaki  296,000; Sakai - 139,500; Wakayama - 160,000).

* The total energy consumption statistic includes petroleum, dry natural gas, coal, net hydro, nuclear, geothermal, solar, wind, wood and waste electric power.
**GDP figures from Global Insight estimates based on purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates.
 

·
Employee of the Year
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
:rolling: Dune suffers from "Powerfulwomenscareandintimidatetheshitoutofme" syndrom.. there is no known cure.



:thumbsup:
Thanks - That appears to be the correct diagnosis. This is exactly why I avoid the news room.

Inesterestingly not everyone agrees that this is "That's about the stupidest thing I have heard (IMHO) in this forum since preachers revelations to rising oil barrel prices on the global market linked to deep water drilling permits for .05 of the world's oil supply"

More interesting data - http://www.eia.doe.gov/cabs/Japan/Background.html

Background
Japan is the world's largest importer of LNG and coal and the second largest net importer of oil.
Japan has few domestic energy resources and is only 16 percent energy self-sufficient. Japan is the third largest oil consumer in the world behind the United States and China and the second-largest net importer of crude oil. It is the world's largest importer of both liquefied natural gas (LNG) and coal. In light of the country's lack of sufficient domestic hydrocarbon resources, Japanese energy companies have actively pursued participation in upstream oil and natural gas projects overseas and provide engineering, construction, financial, and project management services for energy projects around the world. Japan is one of the major exporters of energy-sector capital equipment and has a strong energy research and development program that is supported by the government, which pursues energy efficiency measures domestically in order to increase the country's energy security and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

Oil is the most consumed energy resource in Japan, although its share of total energy consumption has declined from about 80 percent in the 1970s to 45 percent in 2009. Coal continues to account for a significant share of total energy consumption, although natural gas and nuclear power are increasingly important sources. Japan is the third largest consumer of nuclear power in the world, after the United States and France. Hydroelectric power and renewable energy account for a relatively small percentage of total energy consumption in the country.


From: www.nytimes.com/2011/03/16/business/energy-environment/16ene

Global Energy Companies React to Japan’s Nuclear Crisis
By JAD MOUAWAD
Published: March 15, 2011

The price of oil fell below $100 a barrel on Tuesday for the first time in two weeks as investors dumped commodities for safer assets amid worries that the widening disaster in Japan could lead to a global economic slowdown. But the slide in the price of energy may be short-lived. A variety of factors could increase fuel costs in the next few months, even as supplies remain tight because of the continuing unrest in the Middle East.

“Uncertainty and volatility remain key features of the oil market in the short term,” J. P. Morgan’s commodity analysts wrote on Tuesday. The benchmark American crude spot oil price fell nearly 4 percent, to $97.18 a barrel, in New York after spending the previous nine trading sessions above $100. If the lower price persists, it will probably slow the increase in gas prices at the pump, which averaged $3.56 a gallon nationwide on Tuesday, according to AAA.

Countervailing forces are at work in the energy markets. The combination of earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accidents in Japan could reduce energy demand by Japanese consumers and industries in coming months. Some investors worry that the toll could drive the global economy back into a recession.

But some forecasters say they expect that Japan’s oil consumption will actually rebound to meet its reconstruction needs, particularly of products such as diesel fuel used in small power generators. Japan, the world’s third-largest consumer of oil, will also need new supplies of natural gas to make up for the loss of its nuclear reactors that were damaged by the earthquake and the tsunami.

Meanwhile, the continuing political unrest in the Middle East is likely to constrain oil supplies.

In Libya, Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi appears to have gained some momentum in battling a rebellion that took over much of the eastern part of the country.

Still, whatever the outcome of the fighting, many specialists contend that there is little chance for a quick resumption of Libyan oil exports, which have been interrupted for a month.

Even if Colonel Qaddafi’s forces were to prevail, it might be a year before the government exports oil again, and even then it will most likely face the prospect of international sanctions.

Tensions also flared again in the Persian Gulf as Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates sent troops into Bahrain on Monday in an unprecedented move to suppress protests led by the Shiite majority against the Sunni monarchy. The sudden militarization of the crisis in Bahrain is likely to stoke fears about stability in the Persian Gulf at a time of rising Sunni-Shiite tensions throughout the Muslim world.

With Libyan exports suspended, the world is down to an increasingly slim cushion of spare capacity, estimated at four million barrels a day, to make up for supply shortfalls or meet rising demand. Much of that spare capacity is in Saudi Arabia.

Jan Stuart, an economist at Macquarie Securities, has raised his forecast for oil prices for the rest of the year and now predicts they will average $110 a barrel this year, up from a previous forecast of $95 a barrel. “Talk about looking through the fog of war,” Mr. Stuart said.

The supply pressures have been less of a problem in February and March because those are weak months for oil consumption and a time when refineries traditionally perform lengthy maintenance operations in anticipation of the surge in demand that starts before summer.

In April, global oil demand is expected to increase by a million barrels a day as refineries come back online. The International Energy Agency, an energy adviser to developed nations, acknowledged that the market was headed into more turbulent waters.

“Market insouciance may change abruptly as April approaches,” the agency said in its monthly report released Tuesday.

The energy agency said developed nations could tap into their strategic reserves if the market tightened more significantly. “But the fact that this is now being seriously considered shows how far we have come from earlier, more comforting days when a tranquil early 2011 oil market looked more likely,” the agency said.

Natural gas supplies could also come under pressure. In the United States, natural gas futures have remained relatively stable, at $3.97 per thousand cubic feet. But demand from Japan for the liquefied natural gas needed to make up for its lost nuclear capacity might drive up prices around the world.

Japan has shut down 11 nuclear reactors with a total capacity of 9.7 gigawatts — the equivalent of 200,000 barrels of oil a day, or 4.5 percent of Japan’s consumption.

“It’s a little too early to say how the market will be affected, but there’s likely going to be a tightening of the liquefied natural gas market,” said Simon Henry, Royal Dutch Shell’s chief financial officer, at the company’s strategy day in London. “Especially Europe is likely to be affected.”

Shell said that one shipment of liquefied natural gas arrived Monday night in the Tokyo Bay area. But the resupplying operations face complications because of the extent of the damage in northern Japan, according to Shell’s chief executive, Peter Voser.

In the longer run, safety concerns about a nuclear accident might curtail the resurgence of the nuclear industry in the United States and Europe. Germany said it would take off line seven of its oldest reactors, or about a quarter of its nuclear capacity, for safety checks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,914 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,109 Posts
Then "Dune"... what caused the oil prices to drop on the news of the reactor ?
With your logic, it's because we gave out two drilling permits....:rolleyes:

Because world economies are still struggling, wall street is seeing drops, the japanese economy will hurt from this, China's and America's forcast for oil usage are going to be lower than expected....lots of other factors.



Dont worry.

It's only a temporary drop.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,109 Posts
Thanks - That appears to be the correct diagnosis. This is exactly why I avoid the news room.

Inesterestingly not everyone agrees that this is "That's about the stupidest thing I have heard (IMHO) in this forum since preachers revelations to rising oil barrel prices on the global market linked to deep water drilling permits for .05 of the world's oil supply"

More interesting data - http://www.eia.doe.gov/cabs/Japan/Background.html

Background
Japan is the world's largest importer of LNG and coal and the second largest net importer of oil.
Japan has few domestic energy resources and is only 16 percent energy self-sufficient. Japan is the third largest oil consumer in the world behind the United States and China and the second-largest net importer of crude oil. It is the world's largest importer of both liquefied natural gas (LNG) and coal. In light of the country's lack of sufficient domestic hydrocarbon resources, Japanese energy companies have actively pursued participation in upstream oil and natural gas projects overseas and provide engineering, construction, financial, and project management services for energy projects around the world. Japan is one of the major exporters of energy-sector capital equipment and has a strong energy research and development program that is supported by the government, which pursues energy efficiency measures domestically in order to increase the country's energy security and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

Oil is the most consumed energy resource in Japan, although its share of total energy consumption has declined from about 80 percent in the 1970s to 45 percent in 2009. Coal continues to account for a significant share of total energy consumption, although natural gas and nuclear power are increasingly important sources. Japan is the third largest consumer of nuclear power in the world, after the United States and France. Hydroelectric power and renewable energy account for a relatively small percentage of total energy consumption in the country.


From: www.nytimes.com/2011/03/16/business/energy-environment/16ene

Global Energy Companies React to Japan’s Nuclear Crisis
By JAD MOUAWAD
Published: March 15, 2011

The price of oil fell below $100 a barrel on Tuesday for the first time in two weeks as investors dumped commodities for safer assets amid worries that the widening disaster in Japan could lead to a global economic slowdown. But the slide in the price of energy may be short-lived. A variety of factors could increase fuel costs in the next few months, even as supplies remain tight because of the continuing unrest in the Middle East.

“Uncertainty and volatility remain key features of the oil market in the short term,” J. P. Morgan’s commodity analysts wrote on Tuesday. The benchmark American crude spot oil price fell nearly 4 percent, to $97.18 a barrel, in New York after spending the previous nine trading sessions above $100. If the lower price persists, it will probably slow the increase in gas prices at the pump, which averaged $3.56 a gallon nationwide on Tuesday, according to AAA.

Countervailing forces are at work in the energy markets. The combination of earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accidents in Japan could reduce energy demand by Japanese consumers and industries in coming months. Some investors worry that the toll could drive the global economy back into a recession.

But some forecasters say they expect that Japan’s oil consumption will actually rebound to meet its reconstruction needs, particularly of products such as diesel fuel used in small power generators. Japan, the world’s third-largest consumer of oil, will also need new supplies of natural gas to make up for the loss of its nuclear reactors that were damaged by the earthquake and the tsunami.

Meanwhile, the continuing political unrest in the Middle East is likely to constrain oil supplies.

In Libya, Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi appears to have gained some momentum in battling a rebellion that took over much of the eastern part of the country.

Still, whatever the outcome of the fighting, many specialists contend that there is little chance for a quick resumption of Libyan oil exports, which have been interrupted for a month.

Even if Colonel Qaddafi’s forces were to prevail, it might be a year before the government exports oil again, and even then it will most likely face the prospect of international sanctions.

Tensions also flared again in the Persian Gulf as Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates sent troops into Bahrain on Monday in an unprecedented move to suppress protests led by the Shiite majority against the Sunni monarchy. The sudden militarization of the crisis in Bahrain is likely to stoke fears about stability in the Persian Gulf at a time of rising Sunni-Shiite tensions throughout the Muslim world.

With Libyan exports suspended, the world is down to an increasingly slim cushion of spare capacity, estimated at four million barrels a day, to make up for supply shortfalls or meet rising demand. Much of that spare capacity is in Saudi Arabia.

Jan Stuart, an economist at Macquarie Securities, has raised his forecast for oil prices for the rest of the year and now predicts they will average $110 a barrel this year, up from a previous forecast of $95 a barrel. “Talk about looking through the fog of war,” Mr. Stuart said.

The supply pressures have been less of a problem in February and March because those are weak months for oil consumption and a time when refineries traditionally perform lengthy maintenance operations in anticipation of the surge in demand that starts before summer.

In April, global oil demand is expected to increase by a million barrels a day as refineries come back online. The International Energy Agency, an energy adviser to developed nations, acknowledged that the market was headed into more turbulent waters.

“Market insouciance may change abruptly as April approaches,” the agency said in its monthly report released Tuesday.

The energy agency said developed nations could tap into their strategic reserves if the market tightened more significantly. “But the fact that this is now being seriously considered shows how far we have come from earlier, more comforting days when a tranquil early 2011 oil market looked more likely,” the agency said.

Natural gas supplies could also come under pressure. In the United States, natural gas futures have remained relatively stable, at $3.97 per thousand cubic feet. But demand from Japan for the liquefied natural gas needed to make up for its lost nuclear capacity might drive up prices around the world.

Japan has shut down 11 nuclear reactors with a total capacity of 9.7 gigawatts — the equivalent of 200,000 barrels of oil a day, or 4.5 percent of Japan’s consumption.

“It’s a little too early to say how the market will be affected, but there’s likely going to be a tightening of the liquefied natural gas market,” said Simon Henry, Royal Dutch Shell’s chief financial officer, at the company’s strategy day in London. “Especially Europe is likely to be affected.”

Shell said that one shipment of liquefied natural gas arrived Monday night in the Tokyo Bay area. But the resupplying operations face complications because of the extent of the damage in northern Japan, according to Shell’s chief executive, Peter Voser.

In the longer run, safety concerns about a nuclear accident might curtail the resurgence of the nuclear industry in the United States and Europe. Germany said it would take off line seven of its oldest reactors, or about a quarter of its nuclear capacity, for safety checks.
soooooooooooo


their gonna triple their oil imports to replace the one nuke plant that went bad?

:rolling:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,914 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,914 Posts
With your logic, it's because we gave out two drilling permits....:rolleyes:

Because world economies are still struggling, wall street is seeing drops, the japanese economy will hurt from this, China's and America's forcast for oil usage are going to be lower than expected....lots of other factors.



Dont worry.

It's only a temporary drop.
If demand of current supply is down, planet wide... should the prices increase ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,914 Posts
Bro... it's a simple question. It should not require research.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top