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HamerDown - Sorry I haven't gotten back to you sooner, had a couple of non car issues to take care of. The under hood solution will not work, I got ahead of myself on that one. The biggest roadblock to an easy solution is caused by where the power comes from for the AC circuits. Referring to the diagram below, circuit 300 (orange) comes straight out of the ignition switch and directly into the fuse block.
Map Schematic Rectangle Slope Font


I was looking at the possibility of using a "tap" like the picture below.
Cable Wire Electrical supply Composite material Magenta


I'm not crazy about these things, you have to ensure that the "feed" terminal goes into the supply side of the fuse block, not the load side. Plus, the largest capacity I could find was for 10 Amps, far too low for the HVAC Fan.

Circuit 300 supplies power to the fuse terminals for Choke Heat, Power Windows, Power Seat, Auxiliary Fan, and HVAC Fan. Unfortunately, circuit 300 does not supply power to any of the output tap sockets on the fuse block. Tapping into the supply side of one of these fuses using a fabricated cable of 3mm (12AWG) wire might be possible, but I don't think I'd recommend it.
Font Parallel Engineering Automotive tire Science

Any of these fixes would require some under dash surgery, so you might as well do it (or have it done) correctly and safely. There are several different approaches, but essentially it would involve finding the orange circuit 300 wire, tapping into it using 12 AWG wire and an in line fuse holder, then connecting the other side of the in line fuse holder to the brown circuit 50 wire. Remove the 25 amp fuse from the fuse block and leave it out - put the 25 amp fuse into the in line fuse holder. I was hoping to have better news for you, but this one kind of has you boxed in.

As I recall, you said that sometimes the blower would quit working and by removing the fuse and putting it back in the blower would work again. I don't think there is any device in the circuit that would "reset" like that, so I'm betting that removing/installing the fuse was restoring a bad connection in the fuse block itself. Since you now have the AC compressor replaced you might just try it for a while and see what happens. Maybe the "car gods" will smile down on you and allow it to work normally!

Keep us up to date on how this progresses, I'm sorry I was not able to come up with an easy (or less difficult) fix, but I did enjoy digging into all that just the same! Take care and good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
HamerDown - Sorry I haven't gotten back to you sooner, had a couple of non car issues to take care of. The under hood solution will not work, I got ahead of myself on that one. The biggest roadblock to an easy solution is caused by where the power comes from for the AC circuits. Referring to the diagram below, circuit 300 (orange) comes straight out of the ignition switch and directly into the fuse block.
View attachment 105542

I was looking at the possibility of using a "tap" like the picture below.
View attachment 105543

I'm not crazy about these things, you have to ensure that the "feed" terminal goes into the supply side of the fuse block, not the load side. Plus, the largest capacity I could find was for 10 Amps, far too low for the HVAC Fan.

Circuit 300 supplies power to the fuse terminals for Choke Heat, Power Windows, Power Seat, Auxiliary Fan, and HVAC Fan. Unfortunately, circuit 300 does not supply power to any of the output tap sockets on the fuse block. Tapping into the supply side of one of these fuses using a fabricated cable of 3mm (12AWG) wire might be possible, but I don't think I'd recommend it.
View attachment 105545
Any of these fixes would require some under dash surgery, so you might as well do it (or have it done) correctly and safely. There are several different approaches, but essentially it would involve finding the orange circuit 300 wire, tapping into it using 12 AWG wire and an in line fuse holder, then connecting the other side of the in line fuse holder to the brown circuit 50 wire. Remove the 25 amp fuse from the fuse block and leave it out - put the 25 amp fuse into the in line fuse holder. I was hoping to have better news for you, but this one kind of has you boxed in.

As I recall, you said that sometimes the blower would quit working and by removing the fuse and putting it back in the blower would work again. I don't think there is any device in the circuit that would "reset" like that, so I'm betting that removing/installing the fuse was restoring a bad connection in the fuse block itself. Since you now have the AC compressor replaced you might just try it for a while and see what happens. Maybe the "car gods" will smile down on you and allow it to work normally!

Keep us up to date on how this progresses, I'm sorry I was not able to come up with an easy (or less difficult) fix, but I did enjoy digging into all that just the same! Take care and good luck!
Again I must thank you for your time and detailed information, which is second to none!
I fully understand what you're saying... thinking back to the 'loose' fuse I gave it further thought and at time when the AC/blower would stop working and my removing and re inserting the fuse got it to function was 'not' resetting any mysterious relay but as you mentioned just re-establishing a somewhat operational connection.
I've been pondering how I could make that fuse get a better more snug/firm fit.
I even thought 'if' there was I way I could increase the thickness of the male prongs of the 30amp fuse... if I could quickly build-up a layer of solder > > > without hurting the plastic or integrity of the actual fuse.
I'll be experimenting with that in the near future... worse thing to happen is I ruin a few new fuses.
Thanks again, Ray
 

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Again I must thank you for your time and detailed information, which is second to none!
I fully understand what you're saying... thinking back to the 'loose' fuse I gave it further thought and at time when the AC/blower would stop working and my removing and re inserting the fuse got it to function was 'not' resetting any mysterious relay but as you mentioned just re-establishing a somewhat operational connection.
I've been pondering how I could make that fuse get a better more snug/firm fit.
I even thought 'if' there was I way I could increase the thickness of the male prongs of the 30amp fuse... if I could quickly build-up a layer of solder > > > without hurting the plastic or integrity of the actual fuse.
I'll be experimenting with that in the near future... worse thing to happen is I ruin a few new fuses.
Thanks again, Ray
You are more than welcome! Speaking of increasing the thickness of the fuse tabs, the solder idea is worth a try. Fuses are pretty cheap so screwing up a few of them isn't a big deal. I'll deny it if anyone accuses me of doing that, but I have used that trick on other connectors a time or two in the past! Just go easy on the thickness of the solder, once the female terminals have been forced apart they won't snap back for an un-modified fuse.
 
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