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DC Crew
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Ask a dozen Corvette owners how each of them stored their carlast year and you will receive a dozen different answers.

Methods range from parking it next to the house under a table cloth, to complex routines involving raising the Vette off the ground and removing the wheels.

I don't think there is a "proper" method as each owner has slightly different considerations and requirements (rodents? dirt floor in a barn?) -- yet there are probably some basic rules to follow.

- A 50/50 solution of antifreeze and water

- A full tank of gasoline reduces the amount of water that can be absorbed, and add some gas stabilizer.

- If you have a conv't, make sure you keep the top up and the windows up.

- Some folks put a big piece of plastic on the floor to prevent moisture rising up through the concrete floor.

- No battery will hold its charge for a whole winter. If the battery charge is reduced far enough, the insides can freeze, the battery case will crack, and the battery is ruined. If it will be below freezing where you are quite a bit, I'd pull the battery and move it to a warmer place above freezing.

- Mousetraps if you have mice.

- Car cover if there are cats in your barn.

- And check out the car occassionally to make sure everything is good.

Good luck!:thumbsup:
 

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Cleaner than Stock, Faster than Phock
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When I stored mine I would start it at least once a week to get the condensation out of the engine, let it get to operating temps, park the tires on a piece of soft carpet etc to prevent flat spotting.
 

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I read an article written about winter storage. In it was a qoute from a GM powertrain engineer stating his recommendation was to start it at least once a month. Let it idle in neutral until the fans came on, to make sure moisture had been evaporated. On my 94 auto, the fans come on at 228 and off at 218 (FWIW: 193 going down the road at 65). I also operate all the light switches, horn, directionals, power windows, etc. Keeps contacts in them wiped. Turn on the radio to cycle the antenna up and down. On my convertible I always park it with the top UNlatched from the windshield and rear deck (when it's garaged). I'm probably anal about stress on the windshield frame, but the top looks like new even after 13 years. Even over-inflating the tires in the winter, I'll get a slight thump for about the first 5 miles, then smooth, when I take it out in the spring. So many different routines done by us all....read them all, then take what makes sense to you and develope your own winterizing routine. Regards, Frank
 

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Sidepipe said:
I read an article written about winter storage. In it was a qoute from a GM powertrain engineer stating his recommendation was to start it at least once a month. Let it idle in neutral until the fans came on, to make sure moisture had been evaporated. On my 94 auto, the fans come on at 228 and off at 218 (FWIW: 193 going down the road at 65). I also operate all the light switches, horn, directionals, power windows, etc. Keeps contacts in them wiped. Turn on the radio to cycle the antenna up and down. On my convertible I always park it with the top UNlatched from the windshield and rear deck (when it's garaged). I'm probably anal about stress on the windshield frame, but the top looks like new even after 13 years. Even over-inflating the tires in the winter, I'll get a slight thump for about the first 5 miles, then smooth, when I take it out in the spring. So many different routines done by us all....read them all, then take what makes sense to you and develope your own winterizing routine. Regards, Frank
Good stuff! I live in the great white north with temps dropping to
-10 F in winter. Proper winterizing is critical.

Another suggestion re fuel. Add stabilizer to your tank but if you are not driving the car in freezing weather, DO NOT ADD GAS LINE ANTI-FREEZE. This additive will turn to jell over the winter and cause all kinds of problems. Its designed to be added and burned off in a short period.

There are different thoughts on storing with a full tank or a near empty tank. My thinking is to store with as little fuel as possible and add stabilizer only. That way if it goes skunky over the winter, I can drain it of easier or better yet, fill the tank with fresh gas in the spring and mix the remaining old gas with the new. Works for me.

I also put down a poly tarp under the car and use square pieces of styrofoam 2'x2'x 1" under each wheel to prevent flat spots.

:thumbsup:
 
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