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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
:WTF

SEATTLE, Wash. – A mountain goat that fatally gored a hiker, then stood over the man and stared at people trying to help, had shown aggressive behavior in the past, Olympic National Park officials said Monday.

Robert Boardman, 63, of Port Angeles, died Saturday after he was attacked by the goat while hiking on the subalpine Switchback Trail in the park. The trail is popular with residents of nearby Port Angeles, which is about 85 miles west of Seattle.

Park rangers later found the goat, observed blood on it and shot the animal.

Rangers have been tracking the goat and others for the past four years because they have followed people or approached hikers without backing down, said park spokeswoman Barb Maynes.

"It has shown aggressive behavior, however, nothing led us to believe us it was appropriate to take the next level of removal," she said. "This is a highly unusual. There's no record of anything similar in this park. It's a tragedy. We are taking it extremely seriously and doing our best to learn as much as we can."

Park officials have posted signs at trailheads warning hikers to be watchful of all goats and to stay at least 100 feet from the animals. Hikers are also warned not to urinate on or near the trail, because goats are attracted to the salt.

A necropsy, or animal autopsy, was conducted on the goat Sunday night by a private certified veterinary pathologists. Park officials are awaiting test results of blood and tissue samples, which may take a couple weeks, Maynes said.

"We're looking for anything to indicate any presence of diseases, which might shed light on the animal's extremely strange and unusual behavior," she said.

Boardman was hiking with his wife, Susan Chadd, and their friend, Pat Willits, and had stopped for lunch at an overlook when the goat began acting aggressively toward them, the Peninsula Daily News reported.

Boardman urged the others to go ahead while he tried to get rid of the goat, according to the paper. The two heard him yell and ran back to help.

Hikers who came upon the group radioed for help. But it took nearly an hour before rescuers could reach Boardman because the goat stood over him as he lay motionless on the ground, according to the Seattle Times.

"The mountain goat was terribly aggressive," Jessica Baccus, who was hiking with her family, told the Times. "It wouldn't move. It stared us down."

She and her husband, Bill Baccus, a park scientist, tried to lure the goat away by pelting the animal with rocks, shouting at it and using a silver reflective blanket to distract it. It finally moved away, and Jessica Baccus tried to give Boardman CPR until a local doctor who came upon the group took over, she told the Times.

A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter airlifted him out of the park.

Boardman, a locally-known musician and diabetes educator, was an avid hiker who also worked for years as a nurse for the Makah and Lower Elwha Klallam tribes, according to the Peninsula Daily News.

About 300 goats graze the park's alpine meadows and roam its rocky peaks. The animals are not native to the park and were introduced in the 1920s, before the park was established.

Maynes said the park had a two-year live capture program in the late 1980s to remove the goats by helicopter because of the damage the animals wrecked on the park's fragile alpine areas and soil. That program was ended after two years because it was determined to be risky for operators and was less effective, she said.

Wild animals are unpredictable, and thus dangerous.

In Alaska, moose encounters are common, even in urban settings, but rarely do they turn deadly. The last known fatal attack occurred in 1995, when a 71-year-old man was stomped by a cow moose apparently protecting its calf. The moose was killed a week later when it tried to attack another person.

A Michigan man was killed and two others injured when an undernourished grizzly and her three cubs marauded through a crowded campground near Yellowstone National Park on July 28. The mother bear was euthanized, and the cubs were taken to a sanctuary.

A month earlier, a botanist in Wyoming was killed by a bear shortly after the animal woke up from being tranquilized by researchers.

In New Mexico this year, more than 80 bears that were roaming too close to people and searching for food have been killed. "




:(


dam.



That'd be one really dead muthafookin goat if he got near me.. He'd have a 10" survival kinfe stuck in his eye socket.

And that's if I didnt have my bigger bowie knife on me.:whip:




Of course, .......... I'm not 63 year old......
He shoulda had his camp axe, knife or a rock ready...
 

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A man killer Goat??? Wow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
He prob had an over 4500 cu in backpack on.
Over 60 years of age, your a sitting duck wearin one of these.

An rabbid squirrel could kill ya while yer weighed down with an extended hike pack.

Rule number one.
Dont confront the animals.




Rule number two.
Unless your wearing your daypack, take your backpack off if you need to confront a mobile threat.
 

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The best rule is: always stick that 9mm or 45cal
hand gun in your waistband. No one will know and
if your get in that situation, the fine is way better
than death.
 

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I have to agree with others about carrying a large caliber pistol, especially if I'm in Grizzly habitat. These days, you never know who or what you'll run into out in the middle of nowhere.

Having a killer goat to protect a property would be awesome. Nobody would think twice about it, then it would be too late.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have to agree with others about carrying a large caliber pistol, especially if I'm in Grizzly habitat. These days, you never know who or what you'll run into out in the middle of nowhere.

Having a killer goat to protect a property would be awesome. Nobody would think twice about it, then it would be too late.
Hikers arent really pro handgun, and in most cases anyway, you need a hunting round to even slow most animals. Their brains dont register injury when wounded like we do.
You'd almost need a DE .50 or Thompson Contender to pull that off.
That's alotta weight to hike with.
Like carrying a bowling ball.
 

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Hikers arent really pro handgun, and in most cases anyway, you need a hunting round to even slow most animals. Their brains dont register injury when wounded like we do.
You'd almost need a DE .50 or Thompson Contender to pull that off.
That's alotta weight to hike with.
Like carrying a bowling ball.
Guess that only leaves Epinards (spinach) then :D
 

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its rather foolish to go anyplace where your potentially at risk without being fully equipped to defend yourself
its not being paranoid to at least carry a weapon of some type, while out in the great outdoors

youve got options, bear spray works,....


OLD SCHOOL walking stick?



traditional deep woods defensive arm


when its your survival thats at stake its up to YOU to be prepared to deal with the threat you usually carry a spare tire and a jack on the road,don,t you? "because theres a low level threat of a flat tire," well in the wild you need to remain observant and deal with animals occasionally, so you need to deal with that low level threat, and just like the spare tire it can go for decades without being used ,but if you need it "you need it badly ,right now!"

http://www.chuckhawks.com/protection_field.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
500 S&W?

That would help..


But honestly..
When your hiking with three days worth of gear, tent, sleeping bag, food, cooking stove, ect....
Even a handfull of .22 lead bullets and no gun.... are the straw that broke the camels back.
And that's on reasonably level land, let alone mild mountaineering.

****,
One time in Colorado, I went Elk hunting in the mountains and carried nothing but a rifle, a hydration pack, and snow boots.
I was in great shape..........

And it fookin kicked my ass. I hated it.:laughing:
 

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Well then, how would you get an elk out after you shot it? They're pretty big and heavy.

I guess you could just take one leg with you, then leave the rest for the wolves.
 

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I live in Seattle and they play this commercial all the time. They had a three day news story on the goats eating the blackberry bushes by Pike Place Market. He might have thought it was one of the goats in the commercial and just wanted an autograph.






Jr.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well then, how would you get an elk out after you shot it? They're pretty big and heavy.

I guess you could just take one leg with you, then leave the rest for the wolves.
The guides radioed for quads.
 

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never go out into the woods with out a weapon. our whole family used to go fishing in canada but since they don't allow hand guns some guides up there have lost $$$ because we no longer go
 

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One time in Colorado, I went Elk hunting in the mountains and carried nothing but a rifle, a hydration pack, and snow boots.
I was in great shape..........

And it fookin kicked my ass. I hated it.:laughing:
Ive gone on more than 25 ELK hunts in colorado between 1970 and 2001
altitude sickness and lack of oxygen can kick your butt, if you let it but taking it easy for several days until you get acclimated, will allow you to back pack an ELK out once you drop one, PROVIDED you take your time, I rarely carried less than 60 lbs out per load, but with our group it usually took only 3-4 trips with 3-4 guys

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=97&t=1095&p=2138#p2138
 

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This was one of the local goats up on Mt. Evans last year. I got to about 3 feet from him and he stomped his feet and gave me a raspberry. That's when I took a couple of steps backwards. I really don't see how a person could get killed by one of these. They are only about 100 pounds and 3 feet tall. I actually drew a goat tag 5 years ago but got completely snowed off the mountain the day before season started.





 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ive gone on more than 25 ELK hunts in colorado between 1970 and 2001
altitude sickness and lack of oxygen can kick your butt, if you let it but taking it easy for several days until you get acclimated, will allow you to back pack an ELK out once you drop one, PROVIDED you take your time, I rarely carried less than 60 lbs out per load, but with our group it usually took only 3-4 trips with 3-4 guys

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=97&t=1095&p=2138#p2138
Yeah, I had my fair share of barfing...:laughing:

We knew it would be a problem, but none of us had that much vacation time slotted for that event...:laughing:


That's a great article you have there.
You have some good backcountry experience for a florida dude.:thumbsup:
 

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Liberalism?--promises and pronouncements untethered to reality. It is cotton candy rhetoric; spun to taste good for a moment. But then it dissolves in an instant, leaving you feeling sick and disgusted that you tried it in the first place.
That is outstanding :thumbsup:
 
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