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I have a brand new ZR1, built in June, how long should I wait before I do the Dawn, Clay, Polish, Wax regimen?
 

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I have a brand new ZR1, built in June, how long should I wait before I do the Dawn, Clay, Polish, Wax regimen?
I've heard 90 days.
That's for cars that are painted aftermarket, not from the factory.

First off, you need to get an understanding of what each step of the process does, so that you are not unnecessarily doing things and wasting product.

If your concern is whether or not the paint has cured, it has. The paint on a new car is cured pretty much in the drying booth at the factory. The reason why is cars that are painted at the factory are painted as panels, not as an assembled car. The panels are totally naked and thus can be dried at higher temperatures than can be done once the car is assembled. Because of this, the paint is cured before the car is assembled and thus, can be waxed right away.

Next, let's address the use of Dawn. Dawn is used to strip off the old wax and whatever else may be on the paint. Thus, you would NOT use Dawn to wash the car if there is no wax on it. That is some abrasive stuff and you should avoid using it if you don't have to. So if there is no wax on the car, use soap that is made for a car.

The baggie test is what will determine if you need to clay the car. If it passes the baggie test (probably won't), then there is no need to clay. If it fails, clay and clay correctly. This is the most IMPORTANT step of your entire detailing regiment. Without this proper prep, yo' shine ain't gonna be nothing like my shine. :D

The polishing step will be determined by the condition of the paint. If your car is new, it shouldn't have any damage on it. Thus, you will NOT need an abrasive polish. A light polish like the Adam's Fine Machine Polish is all you should need. This is what will make the paint shine (not wax). You want to use a orbital polisher to apply this polish for the best results.

After polishing, all that is left is to wax the car. You have choices in the type of wax you can use, depending on the type of protection you are looking for. Remember, every step of the detailing regiment has a reason and a gauge that tells you when something is required. Use that information to determine what you need to do before you just go and do something. Also, INCORRECT WASHING AND DUST REMOVAL are the number 1 & 2 reasons that creates all the damage you see in paint. Learn to properly wash the car BEFORE you start correcting the paint as it does no good to fix the paint if all you are going to do is continually damage it.

Sorta like bailing water out of a sinking boat with a food strainer. :lookinup:
 

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The short answer - yes you can get started, but watch the Junkman's videos first.

:D
 

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That's for cars that are painted aftermarket, not from the factory.

First off, you need to get an understanding of what each step of the process does, so that you are not unnecessarily doing things and wasting product.

If your concern is whether or not the paint has cured, it has. The paint on a new car is cured pretty much in the drying booth at the factory. The reason why is cars that are painted at the factory are painted as panels, not as an assembled car. The panels are totally naked and thus can be dried at higher temperatures than can be done once the car is assembled. Because of this, the paint is cured before the car is assembled and thus, can be waxed right away.

Next, let's address the use of Dawn. Dawn is used to strip off the old wax and whatever else may be on the paint. Thus, you would NOT use Dawn to wash the car if there is no wax on it. That is some abrasive stuff and you should avoid using it if you don't have to. So if there is no wax on the car, use soap that is made for a car.

The baggie test is what will determine if you need to clay the car. If it passes the baggie test (probably won't), then there is no need to clay. If it fails, clay and clay correctly. This is the most IMPORTANT step of your entire detailing regiment. Without this proper prep, yo' shine ain't gonna be nothing like my shine. :D

The polishing step will be determined by the condition of the paint. If your car is new, it shouldn't have any damage on it. Thus, you will NOT need an abrasive polish. A light polish like the Adam's Fine Machine Polish is all you should need. This is what will make the paint shine (not wax). You want to use a orbital polisher to apply this polish for the best results.

After polishing, all that is left is to wax the car. You have choices in the type of wax you can use, depending on the type of protection you are looking for. Remember, every step of the detailing regiment has a reason and a gauge that tells you when something is required. Use that information to determine what you need to do before you just go and do something. Also, INCORRECT WASHING AND DUST REMOVAL are the number 1 & 2 reasons that creates all the damage you see in paint. Learn to properly wash the car BEFORE you start correcting the paint as it does no good to fix the paint if all you are going to do is continually damage it.

Sorta like bailing water out of a sinking boat with a food strainer. :lookinup:
Junk,

What exactly is the baggie test?
 

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Junk,

What exactly is the baggie test?
I'll help you out AJ ;)

By placing your hand inside of a plastic "baggie" and moving it across the paint surface, you can feel embedded contaminants that require claybar removal.
 

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That is some good advice. Always listen to the Junkman. He knows what he is talking about. As for claying, as AJ (Junkman) stated it will most likely need to be clayed. I bought my wife a 2010 GMC Acadia and it used half a bar of clay on my first detail after picking it up.
 
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