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I have an Acer now.
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Discussion Starter #1
Well I've narrowed down jobs I've been considering and I'm just about totaly convinced becoming an industial engineer will be my purpose in life. But of couse I'm 17 now and theres still a little time to choose diffrent paths and whatever I do I'm gonna do it all the way intill I die, retire or somthing alot better comes up so Its a big choice.

I searched DC in the past and seen alot of people here are engineers, I was wondering what it's like to be an engineer (any kind), what do you like about it, what do you do during a day and what do you not like about it?

Thanks in advance!

:thumbsup:
 

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Certified Stalker
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what do you like to do? Start there. Do not look at a job because of how much money it makes or how prestigious it is, because there's no point in going through life pissed off with what you are doing.

just my $.02
Henry

edit: One other thing...as an engineering student myself (agricultural engineering), college isn't always the answer. Many will likely disagree, but consider this: there are individuals in this world who are masters at their trade and didn't get nearly as much school-time as people with half of their skill. These people like what they do and excel because of that reason alone. Some trades, such as chemical and aerospace engineering certainly require a technical degree, but not everything does, so keep that in mind as you search for what will become your life story.
 

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DC Pit Crew
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Inspiron said:
Well I've narrowed down jobs I've been considering and I'm just about totaly convinced becoming an industial engineer will be my purpose in life. But of couse I'm 17 now and theres still a little time to choose diffrent paths and whatever I do I'm gonna do it all the way intill I die, retire or somthing alot better comes up so Its a big choice.

I searched DC in the past and seen alot of people here are engineers, I was wondering what it's like to be an engineer (any kind), what do you like about it, what do you do during a day and what do you not like about it?

Thanks in advance!

:thumbsup:
If you're lookin' for a real challenge try mechanical engineering :toilet

I won't be graduating with my Mech E degree for another year, so I can't say much about daily life as an actual engineer, but I'm pretty certain it varies a LOT. Last summer I worked for Molex, Inc. One of the largest electrical connector manufacturers in the world, but boring as hell in my opinion. Not enough moving parts. Sat in a cube staring at a computer all day. This summer I'll be working for ExMark, which is a division of Toro, doing design and testing for commercial mowers. Major improvement:thumbsup:

School is very rigorous, and from what I've seen you'd be hard pressed to get a job as an engineer without a degree. What aspect of industrial appeals to you?
 

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Mr. Casino
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DC PIT CREW BOSS
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You could always be an Environmental Engineer

 

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I have an Acer now.
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Discussion Starter #8
lsejlowe said:
School is very rigorous, and from what I've seen you'd be hard pressed to get a job as an engineer without a degree. What aspect of industrial appeals to you?
Well I like indutrial engineering because its what was on the card when I picked it out of a hat. :laughing:


But realy, I asked my cad teacher who designs assembily lines and one of the answers was an industrial engineer so I looked into that and learned how they make things more produceable, they design things in a factory to be more efficent, ergonmic run smoother and more efficently. Also alot of industial engineers work for car compnaies like GM which is somthing I could definatly enjoy. So basicly its just the idea of making things more efficent, a good salary and accoring to some magizne it was a one of the best jobs to have.

elints said:
We use to call the Industrial Engineers (I.E.), imaginary engineers. :laughing:

If you are really into statistics and T&M then you might like it but remember you will never build anything but file cabinets.

http://money.cnn.com/magazines/business2/nextjobboom/?cnn=yes

Thanks for the link!

So, why do you say that? They don't realy do anything besides sit at a desk and figure out numbers?
 

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Mr. Casino
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Thanks for the link! So said:
This is only from personal experience in large processing arenas. The IE's would collect data and seek information from production, design, and construction/maintenance engineers to investigate ways to increase safety and streamline production. Their job description affords the time to do in depth research whereas other engineers are concerned with design, building, controlling, and maintaining production facilities.

If you would prefer to do hands on engineering than IE probably won't satisfy you unless you can find that niche that is the exception.

HTH


BTW It may very well have been an industrial engineer that came up with this idea of how to cook hot dogs more efficiently on the grill. :D

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-11/1110260/ATT-0-53BDED4B0E30D84BBD9A23D3A560E751-image001.jpg
 

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Iron Fist in a Velvet Glove
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Inspiron said:
Well I've narrowed down jobs I've been considering and I'm just about totaly convinced becoming an industial engineer will be my purpose in life. But of couse I'm 17 now and theres still a little time to choose diffrent paths and whatever I do I'm gonna do it all the way intill I die, retire or somthing alot better comes up so Its a big choice.

I searched DC in the past and seen alot of people here are engineers, I was wondering what it's like to be an engineer (any kind), what do you like about it, what do you do during a day and what do you not like about it?

Thanks in advance!

:thumbsup:
I'm one of those Imaginary Engineers that someone mentioned. However, I also took additional coursework in mechanical and electrical engineering.

My first job out of college was with Nabisco at a processing plant. The plant had eight oven lines and ten packaging lines (Oreo, Chips Ahoy, Nilla Wafers, Saltines, and a general purpose snack line). I worked with all the Departments in the plant for process improvements and cost reductions. Process improvements ranged from "how to get more production out of this machne/process line" to material balances where we traced the sources of waste in the process and devised ways to eliminate or reduce it. I also had a lot of involvement with the Quality Engineers to develop statistical methods, and I worked with Plant Engineering to justify capital equipment projects and redesign process lines.

When I got my Master's degree, I went into Manufacturing management with McCormick & Co. While it wasn't a traditional Industrial Engineering job, I was able to use the general skills I'd learned to manage the operation. I also was the Plant Engineer, and worked on justifying, installing, and troubleshooting new equipment. At that job, I also got involved in PLC programming, and had more involvement with Electrical Engineering.

I had one more IE stint as a Division Industrial Engineer with responsibilities for several plants. That job was mostly involved with capital equipment justification and project planning, but the IE skills fit right in.

At this point, I'm an Engineering Manager in an aerospace lab (a long way from the Food industry), and this job is heavy on electrical and mechanical engineering. I talk with customers in Europe and US, and also manage the flow of work through my lab in the US as well as independant labs in India.

All in all, my IE education has provided the tools I need as well as the technical background to manage projects, processes, and people.

Many of the IE's I graduated with have moved from traditional IE roles and into middle/higher management positions. Of course, some of those same sensible IE types seem to forget everything they ever learned about management as soon as they get on the bonus system, but that's a different thread.

As someone else posted, you have to determine where your interests lie. If you want to design things, then mechanical or electrical engineering may be more to your liking. If you want to balance things with people, with an eye toward moving into general management, then IE may be the right choice.

Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions.

Good Luck!

Steven
 

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I have an Acer now.
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Discussion Starter #11
elints said:
This is only from personal experience in large processing arenas. The IE's would collect data and seek information from production, design, and construction/maintenance engineers to investigate ways to increase safety and streamline production. Their job description affords the time to do in depth research whereas other engineers are concerned with design, building, controlling, and maintaining production facilities.

If you would prefer to do hands on engineering than IE probably won't satisfy you unless you can find that niche that is the exception.

HTH


BTW It may very well have been an industrial engineer that came up with this idea of how to cook hot dogs more efficiently on the grill. :D

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-11/1110260/ATT-0-53BDED4B0E30D84BBD9A23D3A560E751-image001.jpg

:laughing: :laughing: :laughing:

Thank you for that information! It is very helpfull!

:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

oldcorvettef said:
I'm one of those Imaginary Engineers that someone mentioned. However, I also took additional coursework in mechanical and electrical engineering.

My first job out of college was with Nabisco at a processing plant. The plant had eight oven lines and ten packaging lines (Oreo, Chips Ahoy, Nilla Wafers, Saltines, and a general purpose snack line). I worked with all the Departments in the plant for process improvements and cost reductions. Process improvements ranged from "how to get more production out of this machne/process line" to material balances where we traced the sources of waste in the process and devised ways to eliminate or reduce it. I also had a lot of involvement with the Quality Engineers to develop statistical methods, and I worked with Plant Engineering to justify capital equipment projects and redesign process lines.

When I got my Master's degree, I went into Manufacturing management with McCormick & Co. While it wasn't a traditional Industrial Engineering job, I was able to use the general skills I'd learned to manage the operation. I also was the Plant Engineer, and worked on justifying, installing, and troubleshooting new equipment. At that job, I also got involved in PLC programming, and had more involvement with Electrical Engineering.

I had one more IE stint as a Division Industrial Engineer with responsibilities for several plants. That job was mostly involved with capital equipment justification and project planning, but the IE skills fit right in.

At this point, I'm an Engineering Manager in an aerospace lab (a long way from the Food industry), and this job is heavy on electrical and mechanical engineering. I talk with customers in Europe and US, and also manage the flow of work through my lab in the US as well as independant labs in India.

All in all, my IE education has provided the tools I need as well as the technical background to manage projects, processes, and people.

Many of the IE's I graduated with have moved from traditional IE roles and into middle/higher management positions. Of course, some of those same sensible IE types seem to forget everything they ever learned about management as soon as they get on the bonus system, but that's a different thread.

As someone else posted, you have to determine where your interests lie. If you want to design things, then mechanical or electrical engineering may be more to your liking. If you want to balance things with people, with an eye toward moving into general management, then IE may be the right choice.

Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions.

Good Luck!

Steven
Thankyou for telling me that, Its great to know what it was like from an industrial engineer and to know what kind of work you had. After hearing what you guys said I have a much better idea of what the job.

:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

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DC Crew
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Inspiron said:
Well I've narrowed down jobs I've been considering and I'm just about totaly convinced becoming an industial engineer will be my purpose in life. But of couse I'm 17 now and theres still a little time to choose diffrent paths and whatever I do I'm gonna do it all the way intill I die, retire or somthing alot better comes up so Its a big choice.
:thumbsup:
I think it's great that you want to be an industrial engineer ... frankly... because you'd be damn good at it.

And, maybe you can change the world in some way.
 

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DC Crew
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Inspiron said:
Thankyou for telling me that, Its great to know what it was like from an industrial engineer and to know what kind of work you had. After hearing what you guys said I have a much better idea of what the job.
Sure, but you could also end up at a custom wheel manufacturing facility... or a carbon fiber body panel plant ...

:hump:
 

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I have an Acer now.
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Discussion Starter #14
Patrick said:
I think it's great that you want to be an industrial engineer ... frankly... because you'd be damn good at it.

And, maybe you can change the world in some way.

Thanks pat, I hope your right there!
 

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It a broad field.I'm the lead engineer at a power and facilities plant for the trama center of the pacific.If you get into power generation,the salary for just an "operator" is $32 per hour.Then you can get up into managment or "lead" and the pay keeps going up.
I might start teaching "auxilary power" classes for the merchant marines,this would be on the side from my other job..
Just for the record,i'm typing this from work...he he
Good luck in your decission.
 

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I graduated as an IE from Syracuse in 82. Several of my classmates turned internships into permanenet jobs with GM after graduation. I served as an IE in the Air Force in a Civil Engineering Squadron, which was mostly running the logistics end of things. (After a certain level in military engineering, you become a general engineer, no longer a specialist) I then went to work for a large printing company as a production manager - engineers had it all over the other managers in my company, IMHO, because they understood the nature of processes much better than the bean counters.

And now I teach high school math. Go figure.
 
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