Corvette Forum : DigitalCorvettes.com Corvette Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I want to go through my suspension and replace my bushings with some new polyurethane bushings. I was wondering how difficult it would be to replace them and would I need any special tools. Looking to do the complete suspension kit on my 1976 and it has the gymkhana suspension. Any recommendations on how to go about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
so far i have done most of mine on a 74 only had to have the oneson the reararms done by a pro need a press and special tool for those
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,100 Posts
The front is not bad. There are a couple of places you really need a press and some pipe to push against, but it's really not that tough. I did Ol' Red before I aquired a press- I took the lower arms to a local shop and they pressed the bushings out and back in for $25.
I did the rears too, but I mostly did them with an economy size hammer.
Poly bushings everywhere- If I was going to do it again, I'd maybe rethink the rear.

The biggest thing to remember is that the springs (especially the front) have a big bunch of stored energy that's just looking to get free. Anytime you're working with a spring, either a leaf or a coil spring, pay close attention to the direction it's pushing and what it might do if it gets away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Not to worried about the coil springs in the front. I have a spring compressor. But i've never took the mono leafspring off before. Is there a trick to doing it. Should I do one side at a time kinda thing. Thats my biggest worry is getting it off but not being able to get it back on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,948 Posts
Not to worried about the coil springs in the front. I have a spring compressor. But i've never took the mono leafspring off before. Is there a trick to doing it. Should I do one side at a time kinda thing. Thats my biggest worry is getting it off but not being able to get it back on.

The ear spring really isn't that bad.

Get the rear of the car on a pair of jack stands under the frame where the trailing arms connect.

Roll a floor jack with a good solid cradle up on one side of the spring. Place the cradle up on the leaf spring as close to the spring bolt nut as you can, on the inside.

Jack up the spring slowly, and once it lifts off of the nut you can begin removing the nut.

Once the nut is removed, slowly...slowly, slowly, lower the jack and the spring end will drop considerably as it curls toward the floor.

Repeat this on the other side. Once both sides are released, it's a simple matter of unbolting the shield and the spring bolts from the rear end housing.

The rear spring is VERY heavy, so keep it supported.

Re-installation is the exact opposite and just remember that this is the best time to replace the spring if it's worn out, with either a new leaf spring or an after market composite spring.

I just did this again not long ago when I installed a coil over Sharkbite kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
One thing the previous poster left out is that when you go back on with the rear spring, don't torque the bolts on the diff till after you have the weight of the car on the spring. If you do, you stand a good chance of cracking the rear diff cover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,948 Posts
One thing the previous poster left out is that when you go back on with the rear spring, don't torque the bolts on the diff till after you have the weight of the car on the spring. If you do, you stand a good chance of cracking the rear diff cover.

I thought that was just from over-torquing the bolts.

I've personally removed and installed a rear leaf 3 times. Every time I followed the proper pattern and torque spec. I have had no issues with cracks and I did it all in the air before the car was dropped.

I'd like to know who's had a crack and how if anyone has a story to tell.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you everyone for the info. D_B Thanks for the info on the rear leaf spring. After I read your directions. Sounds like it won't be too difficult unless I cant brake the dam nuts loose. I sure hope putting these new bushings on will help with the ride and handling. Its rides all over the road and handles sloppy. Very rough ride. I read somewhere that the gymkhana suspention rides rough. Does anyone have any info on the gymkhana suspention?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,948 Posts
Thank you everyone for the info. D_B Thanks for the info on the rear leaf spring. After I read your directions. Sounds like it won't be too difficult unless I cant brake the dam nuts loose. I sure hope putting these new bushings on will help with the ride and handling. Its rides all over the road and handles sloppy. Very rough ride. I read somewhere that the gymkhana suspention rides rough. Does anyone have any info on the gymkhana suspention?

I have had to cut spring bolts before because of seized fasteners, so prepare for that as an option. A reciprocating saw and a metal blade will make quick work on the bolt.

You can even decide to preemptively replace them with new bolts by ordering a set from a vendor and having them ready for the project.

You can one step further, and order slightly longer bolts for the springs, which will help you drop the rear of the car a little bit if one of your projects is ride height.
 

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
3,776 Posts
If the rear spring is torqued in place with the car in the air there is a very good change it will break the cover ears. Ears can also break from impact, like a pot hole. Seen it now for 35 years.
I never use a jack to load or unload a rear spring. I never liked it and once I had one slip and the car jumped up 1' and landed down on the blocks. If if was on jack stands it would have fallen for sure. I use a 5' bar under the spring end and over the strut rod,then put a 10' pipe on it and have perfect leverage. A helper holds it up and I remove the nut,lower the spring and do the other end. Works every time.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,948 Posts
If the rear spring is torqued in place with the car in the air there is a very good change it will break the cover ears. Ears can also break from impact, like a pot hole. Seen it now for 35 years.
I never use a jack to load or unload a rear spring. I never liked it and once I had one slip and the car jumped up 1' and landed down on the blocks. If if was on jack stands it would have fallen for sure. I use a 5' bar under the spring end and over the strut rod,then put a 10' pipe on it and have perfect leverage. A helper holds it up and I remove the nut,lower the spring and do the other end. Works every time.:thumbsup:

The car jumped a foot up off the blocks? :WTF
 

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
3,776 Posts
The car jumped a foot up off the blocks? :WTF
yup, I put the jack method away after that and never had a problem the way I do it now. It's not a good feeling standing next to a flying 3000 lb hunk of steel and fiberglass.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top