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Ellen Brown
Global Research
April 13, 2011

Note: As Ellen Brown writes in the following article, the war against Libya is not about Gaddafi’s treatment of protesters – it is about banking. Gaddafi refuses to play by the rules banksters impose on most of the rest of the world. Obama’s illegal war is also a continuation of the PNAC era plan to destroy Arab culture and force Muslims back into the stone age. Like Iraq before Bush Senior’s illegal invasion, Libya has an excellent health care system – thanks to its oil riches – and a remarkable civilian infrastructure for an African nation. Globalists and the neocon faction hate this and plan to turn Libya into a social and economic basket case like they did to Iraq, killing 1.5 million Iraqis in the process. The humanitarian chant we hear day in and day out in the corporate media is merely a thinly disguised pretense and cover for mass murder and destruction. –Kurt Nimmo

Several writers have noted the odd fact that the Libyan rebels took time out from their rebellion in March to create their own central bank – this before they even had a government. Robert Wenzel wrote in the Economic Policy Journal:

I have never before heard of a central bank being created in just a matter of weeks out of a popular uprising. This suggests we have a bit more than a rag tag bunch of rebels running around and that there are some pretty sophisticated influences.

Alex Newman wrote in the New American:

In a statement released last week, the rebels reported on the results of a meeting held on March 19. Among other things, the supposed rag-tag revolutionaries announced the “[d]esignation of the Central Bank of Benghazi as a monetary authority competent in monetary policies in Libya and appointment of a Governor to the Central Bank of Libya, with a temporary headquarters in Benghazi.”

Newman quoted CNBC senior editor John Carney, who asked, “Is this the first time a revolutionary group has created a central bank while it is still in the midst of fighting the entrenched political power? It certainly seems to indicate how extraordinarily powerful central bankers have become in our era.”

Another anomaly involves the official justification for taking up arms against Libya. Supposedly it’s about human rights violations, but the evidence is contradictory. According to an article on the Fox News website on February 28:

As the United Nations works feverishly to condemn Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi for cracking down on protesters, the body’s Human Rights Council is poised to adopt a report chock-full of praise for Libya’s human rights record.

The review commends Libya for improving educational opportunities, for making human rights a “priority” and for bettering its “constitutional” framework. Several countries, including Iran, Venezuela, North Korea, and Saudi Arabia but also Canada, give Libya positive marks for the legal protections afforded to its citizens — who are now revolting against the regime and facing bloody reprisal.

Whatever might be said of Gaddafi, the Libyan people seem to be thriving. A delegation of medical professionals from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus wrote in an appeal to Russian President Medvedev and Prime Minister Putin that after becoming acquainted with Libyan life, it was their view that in few nations did people live in such comfort:

[Libyans] are entitled to free treatment, and their hospitals provide the best in the world of medical equipment. Education in Libya is free, capable young people have the opportunity to study abroad at government expense. When marrying, young couples receive 60,000 Libyan dinars (about 50,000 U.S. dollars) of financial assistance. Non-interest state loans, and as practice shows, undated. Due to government subsidies the price of cars is much lower than in Europe, and they are affordable for every family. Gasoline and bread cost a penny, no taxes for those who are engaged in agriculture. The Libyan people are quiet and peaceful, are not inclined to drink, and are very religious.

They maintained that the international community had been misinformed about the struggle against the regime. “Tell us,” they said, “who would not like such a regime?”

Even if that is just propaganda, there is no denying at least one very popular achievement of the Libyan government: it brought water to the desert by building the largest and most expensive irrigation project in history, the $33 billion GMMR (Great Man-Made River) project. Even more than oil, water is crucial to life in Libya. The GMMR provides 70 percent of the population with water for drinking and irrigation, pumping it from Libya’s vast underground Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System in the south to populated coastal areas 4,000 kilometers to the north. The Libyan government has done at least some things right.

Another explanation for the assault on Libya is that it is “all about oil,” but that theory too is problematic. As noted in the National Journal, the country produces only about 2 percent of the world’s oil. Saudi Arabia alone has enough spare capacity to make up for any lost production if Libyan oil were to disappear from the market. And if it’s all about oil, why the rush to set up a new central bank?

Another provocative bit of data circulating on the Net is a 2007 “Democracy Now” interview of U.S. General Wesley Clark (Ret.). In it he says that about 10 days after September 11, 2001, he was told by a general that the decision had been made to go to war with Iraq. Clark was surprised and asked why. “I don’t know!” was the response. “I guess they don’t know what else to do!” Later, the same general said they planned to take out seven countries in five years: Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Iran.

What do these seven countries have in common? In the context of banking, one that sticks out is that none of them is listed among the 56 member banks of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS). That evidently puts them outside the long regulatory arm of the central bankers’ central bank in Switzerland.

The most renegade of the lot could be Libya and Iraq, the two that have actually been attacked. Kenneth Schortgen Jr., writing on Examiner.com, noted that “ix months before the US moved into Iraq to take down Saddam Hussein, the oil nation had made the move to accept Euros instead of dollars for oil, and this became a threat to the global dominance of the dollar as the reserve currency, and its dominion as the petrodollar.”

According to a Russian article titled “Bombing of Lybia – Punishment for Ghaddafi for His Attempt to Refuse US Dollar,” Gadaffi made a similarly bold move: he initiated a movement to refuse the dollar and the euro, and called on Arab and African nations to use a new currency instead, the gold dinar. Gadaffi suggested establishing a united African continent, with its 200 million people using this single currency. During the past year, the idea was approved by many Arab countries and most African countries. The only opponents were the Republic of South Africa and the head of the League of Arab States. The initiative was viewed negatively by the USA and the European Union, with French president Nicolas Sarkozy calling Libya a threat to the financial security of mankind; but Gaddafi was not swayed and continued his push for the creation of a united Africa.

And that brings us back to the puzzle of the Libyan central bank. In an article posted on the Market Oracle, Eric Encina observed:

One seldom mentioned fact by western politicians and media pundits: the Central Bank of Libya is 100% State Owned. . . . Currently, the Libyan government creates its own money, the Libyan Dinar, through the facilities of its own central bank. Few can argue that Libya is a sovereign nation with its own great resources, able to sustain its own economic destiny. One major problem for globalist banking cartels is that in order to do business with Libya, they must go through the Libyan Central Bank and its national currency, a place where they have absolutely zero dominion or power-broking ability. Hence, taking down the Central Bank of Libya (CBL) may not appear in the speeches of Obama, Cameron and Sarkozy but this is certainly at the top of the globalist agenda for absorbing Libya into its hive of compliant nations.

Libya not only has oil. According to the IMF, its central bank has nearly 144 tons of gold in its vaults. With that sort of asset base, who needs the BIS, the IMF and their rules?

All of which prompts a closer look at the BIS rules and their effect on local economies. An article on the BIS website states that central banks in the Central Bank Governance Network are supposed to have as their single or primary objective “to preserve price stability.” They are to be kept independent from government to make sure that political considerations don’t interfere with this mandate. “Price stability” means maintaining a stable money supply, even if that means burdening the people with heavy foreign debts. Central banks are discouraged from increasing the money supply by printing money and using it for the benefit of the state, either directly or as loans.

In a 2002 article in Asia Times titled “The BIS vs National Banks,” Henry Liu maintained:

BIS regulations serve only the single purpose of strengthening the international private banking system, even at the peril of national economies. The BIS does to national banking systems what the IMF has done to national monetary regimes. National economies under financial globalization no longer serve national interests.

. . . FDI [foreign direct investment] denominated in foreign currencies, mostly dollars, has condemned many national economies into unbalanced development toward export, merely to make dollar-denominated interest payments to FDI, with little net benefit to the domestic economies.

He added, “Applying the State Theory of Money, any government can fund with its own currency all its domestic developmental needs to maintain full employment without inflation.” The “state theory of money” refers to money created by governments rather than private banks.

The presumption of the rule against borrowing from the government’s own central bank is that this will be inflationary, while borrowing existing money from foreign banks or the IMF will not. But all banks actually create the money they lend on their books, whether publicly-owned or privately-owned. Most new money today comes from bank loans. Borrowing it from the government’s own central bank has the advantage that the loan is effectively interest-free. Eliminating interest has been shown to reduce the cost of public projects by an average of 50%.

And that appears to be how the Libyan system works. According to Wikipedia, the functions of the Central Bank of Libya include “issuing and regulating banknotes and coins in Libya” and “managing and issuing all state loans.” Libya’s wholly state-owned bank can and does issue the national currency and lend it for state purposes.

That would explain where Libya gets the money to provide free education and medical care, and to issue each young couple $50,000 in interest-free state loans. It would also explain where the country found the $33 billion to build the Great Man-Made River project. Libyans are worried that NATO-led air strikes are coming perilously close to this pipeline, threatening another humanitarian disaster.

So is this new war all about oil or all about banking? Maybe both – and water as well. With energy, water, and ample credit to develop the infrastructure to access them, a nation can be free of the grip of foreign creditors. And that may be the real threat of Libya: it could show the world what is possible. Most countries don’t have oil, but new technologies are being developed that could make non-oil-producing nations energy-independent, particularly if infrastructure costs are halved by borrowing from the nation’s own publicly-owned bank. Energy independence would free governments from the web of the international bankers, and of the need to shift production from domestic to foreign markets to service the loans.

If the Gaddafi government goes down, it will be interesting to watch whether the new central bank joins the BIS, whether the nationalized oil industry gets sold off to investors, and whether education and health care continue to be free.

Ellen Brown is an attorney and president of the Public Banking Institute, http://PublicBankingInstitute.org. In Web of Debt, her latest of eleven books, she shows how a private cartel has usurped the power to create money from the people themselves, and how we the people can get it back. Her websites are http://webofdebt.com and http://ellenbrown.com.

http://www.infowars.com/libya-all-about-oil-or-all-about-banking/
 

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When I see the word "bankster" in the first sentence, I know the article is worthless crap. This obsession is insane. There ARE othe issues and influences in this world besides bankers. Very few things involve only one factor - including Libya.
 

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Interesting. I dont know enough about the subject to differentiate fact from fiction. Ill have to do some digging.
 

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All crap. Obama's belated support for the opposition was merely based on picking winners. We don't want to be supporting the side that eventually loses this battle. Obama waited to get a better feel for who had the upper hand. When he made his decision to lend support, the rebels appeared to have the upper hand. But shortly after we got involved, Ghadaffi's army found it's footing and the tide turned. In the end, we may have supported the eventual losers. If we did, there will be hell to pay since Libya had backed away from supporting terrorism since coming clean on Lockerbie. This whole article is a stretch by bank haters looking at the world through their blinders and filters that can only see bankers at the bottom of every ill. :crazy:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Interesting. I dont know enough about the subject to differentiate fact from fiction. Ill have to do some digging.
:thumbsup: I found it interesting that the ragtag rebels could so quickly set up their own central bank and start selling oil.. :laughing:

The paper trail is long and interesting..
 

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All crap. Obama's belated support for the opposition was merely based on picking winners. We don't want to be supporting the side that eventually loses this battle. Obama waited to get a better feel for who had the upper hand.
:laughing: Your post is all crap tex.. suddenly Obama the socialist, is a military mastermind? :rolling::rolling: Good luck selling that one...
 

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:laughing: Your post is all crap tex.. suddenly Obama the socialist, is a military mastermind? :rolling::rolling: Good luck selling that one...
Quite the contrary. He stalled for a week or more trying to decide who to back, then apparently flipped a coin and came up tails in a heads world. :laughing:
 

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Quite the contrary. He stalled for a week or more trying to decide who to back, then apparently flipped a coin and came up tails in a heads world. :laughing:
Hell, the war was on before he knew it.. he is told what is going to happen, not vice-versa..
 

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And guess what will be used to secure the loan to the CIA backed rebels? :laughing:

Libya Rebels Seek $2 Billion Loan, Allies Ponder Next Steps

Libyan rebels want to borrow at least $2 billion to buy food, medicine, fuel and perhaps weapons as their foreign allies agreed on the need to do more to help them prevail over Muammar Qaddafi’s forces.

Members of the so-called Libyan contact group said in a statement in Qatar that they may create a “temporary financial mechanism” to finance the rebels using Libyan government assets frozen abroad.

Short-term loans are “an option on the table that we discussed” at the Qatar meeting, Ali Tarhouni, the Interim Transitional National Council’s finance minister, said in an interview in Benghazi. The borrowing, which may be for as long as two years, could be repaid when Libyan assets are unfrozen, Tarhouni said. Reserves at the rebels’ central bank in Benghazi may not be enough to cover import needs for a month, he said.

The contact group, which includes the U.S., the U.K., France and other countries lending military support, agreed at the meeting that “Qaddafi and his regime had lost all legitimacy and he must leave power, allowing the Libyan people to determine their own future,” according to a statement released yesterday after the meeting in Doha.

Qatari Prime Minister Hamad bin Jasim Al-Thani said his country would “look into” supplying military equipment to the rebels. In London, Prime Minister David Cameron told the BBC that the U.K. would provide body armor.
Anglo-French Commitment

Libya has been effectively split in two since the early stages of the two-month conflict, a division that has helped push oil prices up 25 percent. Crude for May delivery dropped 0.2 percent to $106.85 a barrel at 6 a.m. in New York. It reached a 2 1/2-year high of $112.79 a barrel on April 8.

Libya holds Africa’s biggest oil reserves. Qatar confirmed April 12 that it is marketing Libyan oil on behalf of the opposition and is providing energy products to Benghazi.

NATO airstrikes against Qaddafi’s military since March 19 haven’t stopped artillery attacks and sniper fire on cities such as Misrata, in the west of the country, or enabled the rebels to take and permanently hold strategic towns such as the oil port of Ras Lanuf.

Eight rebels were killed in an attack by government forces near Misrata, Al Jazeera television reported today.
No Let-Up

Cameron and French President Nicolas Sarkozy, who met in Paris yesterday, reaffirmed their commitment to ousting Qaddafi and called for no let-up in air attacks, according to a French official, who spoke on the condition that he not be identified. The leaders agreed that arming the rebels wouldn’t violate the United Nations embargo, the official said.

There are divisions among NATO countries over the means to achieve democracy in Libya, though the allies are united around that goal, French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe told reporters in Berlin today.

Libya’s Foreign Minister Abdul-Ati al-Obeidi said Qaddafi is seeking a political solution to the war along the lines of this week’s African Union proposal involving a withdrawal of troops from civilian areas, according to his Cypriot counterpart Markos Kyprianou, who met Obeidi in Nicosia today. Libya’s government will cooperate with the European Union and international organizations over aid supplies, Obeidi said, according to Kyprianou.

The rebels rejected the African plan because it didn’t specify Qaddafi’s departure.

NATO foreign ministers, including U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, meet today in Berlin to consider what further actions might be taken by the alliance, which has been stymied in its effort to stop the assault on Misrata.
‘Protected Zone’

Qaddafi’s actions in Misrata may constitute war crimes, Clinton said in a statement yesterday. She gave no indication of what additional steps NATO can take to stop it.

The rebels’ interim government appealed to the United Nations to declare Misrata an “internationally protected zone” and help prevent “a massacre of men, women and children” in the besieged city.

“There is fighting going on and electricity and water have been cut off throughout the city,” making it difficult to distribute aid that reaches Misrata by sea, Abdulhamid Elmadani, secretary-general of the Libyan Red Crescent, said in an interview yesterday in Benghazi. He said three other west Libyan towns, with an estimated 15,000 people in each, are in even worse straits as they lack the port that enables deliveries to reach Misrata.

More than 1,000 people have been killed and “several thousand” wounded in Misrata in the six-week siege, according to Suleiman Fortia, a spokesman for the rebels’ council.

To contact the reporters on this story: Robert Tuttle in Doha at [email protected]; Caroline Alexander in London at [email protected]; Maher Chmaytelli in Benghazi at [email protected].

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew J. Barden at [email protected]

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-13/libyan-rebels-seek-2-billion-loan-as-allies-ponder-steps-in-qaddafi-fight.html
 

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It's a real stretch to think that because finances are involved in the strategy of the war that bankers are somehow at the helm. Basically, we (the U.N. and NATO) backed a group that we thought could make quick work of taking over. We were wrong, so now we are stuck with the liklihood of a protracted civil war. While we don't want to commit ground forces, we don't want Gadaffi to prevail, so we are left with financially supporting the rebels in hopes they can hold out and wear the regime down. I would call it instant quagmire.
 

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It's a real stretch to think that because finances are involved in the strategy of the war that bankers are somehow at the helm.
I think there are several countries who would disagree with you.. Russia comes to mind instantly.

Basically, we (the U.N. and NATO) backed a group that we thought could make quick work of taking over. We were wrong, so now we are stuck with the liklihood of a protracted civil war.
Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, now Libya, Ivory coast already has their new "leader".. who's next?

While we don't want to commit ground forces, we don't want Gadaffi to prevail, so we are left with financially supporting the rebels in hopes they can hold out and wear the regime down. I would call it instant quagmire.
Yeah, that guy is ruthless, what kind of monster gives newlyweds a $50k loan with no interest?? How barbaric.. And the mere thought of building such a lifeline with that aquifer of his, with no one profiting on it, who the hell does he think he is? Next thing you know, he will have free medical for his people.. oh wait, that ruthless bastard did that too!! Nuke his ass! :laughing:
 

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Yeah, that guy is ruthless, what kind of monster gives newlyweds a $50k loan with no interest?? How barbaric.. And the mere thought of building such a lifeline with that aquifer of his, with no one profiting on it, who the hell does he think he is? Next thing you know, he will have free medical for his people.. oh wait, that ruthless bastard did that too!! Nuke his ass! :laughing:
You forgot that little tiny indiscretion of blowing up a plane full of American students. Wonder if there were any lucky newleyweds on there to collect the $50k?:spanked:
 

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Interesting. I dont know enough about the subject to differentiate fact from fiction. Ill have to do some digging.
:agree:

Very interesting.

The author uses alot of derogatory terms that are unrofessional, like banksters, globalists, neocon, and the PNAC tin foil hat extensions, but yet it still has some interesting questions if true.

Lots to disassemble and evaluate here.


Good find, Vettenewb.:thumbsup:

I'm bookmarking this.
 

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You forgot that little tiny indiscretion of blowing up a plane full of American students. Wonder if there were any lucky newleyweds on there to collect the $50k?:spanked:
Ahh hell Tex, your arguing in one thread that civilian casualties are expected and then acting all high and mighty in another... are you a mole?
 

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This kinda brings to mind, the Napoleonic Wars, the American Revolution, and The American Civil War, and their strong ties to banking actions.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
West vs. China: A New Cold War Begins On Libyan Soil

Patrick Henningsen
Infowars.com
April 13, 2011

The question as to why US-led NATO forces are determined to engineer a regime change in Libya is now becoming clear. Whilst media pundits and political experts still argue over whether the Libyan rebel gangs are actually being backed and directed by US, UK and Israel intelligence agencies, broader long-range Western policy objectives for Libya are being completely ignored.

One only has to read the strategic briefings in U.S. AFRICOM documents to realize the true endgame in Libya: the control of valuable resources and the eviction of China from North Africa.

When the US formed AFRICOM in 2007, some 49 countries signed on to the US military charter for Africa but one country refused: Libya. Such a treacherous act by Libya’s leader Moummar Qaddafi would only sow the seeds for a future conflict down the road in 2011.

NATO: It’s been reduced to a mere private security force for western corporate interests.

According to Dr Paul Craig Roberts, the situation with Qaddafi is much different than the other recent protests in the Arab world. “Why is NATO there?” has become to real question, says Roberts, who fears that risky involvement stemming from American influence could lead to catastrophic breaking point in Libya.

CHINESE INTERESTS IN LIBYA

According to Bejing’s Ministry of Commerce, China’s current contracts in Libya number no less than 50 large projects involving a contracts in excess of 18 billion USD. What is even more revealing here is that due to the recent instability in the North African region, China’s investments have taken a serious hit. The recent political turmoil in the region has caused China’s foreign contracted projects to drop with new contracts amounting to $ 3,470,000,000, down 53.2%. Among them, the amount of new contracts in Libya, down by 45.3%, 13.9% less turnover; to Algeria, the amount of the contract fell 97.1%, turnover decreased by 10.7% – all within the first 2 months of this year.

In addition to the numerous Chinese investments in Libya, the North African nation has also recently completed one of the most expensive and advance water works projects in world history- Libya’s Great Man Made River. A 30 year venture, finished only last year, gives Libya the potential for an agricultural and economic boom that would certainly mean trouble for competing agri-markets in neighboring Israel and Egypt. It could also transform Libya into the emerging “bread basket” of Africa. With global food prices on the rise, and Libya possessing a stable currency and cheap domestic energy supply, it doesn’t take an economic genius to see what role Libya could play in the global market place.

Central to AFRICOM’s strategic goals is to confront the increasing Chinese influence on the continent. One AFRICOM study suggests that China will eventually dispatch troops to Africa to defend its interests there:

“Now China has achieved a stage of economic development which requires endless supplies of African raw materials and has started to develop the capacity to exercise influence in most corners of the globe. The extrapolation of history predicts that distrust and uncertainty will inevitably lead the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) to Africa in staggering numbers…”

So we have a vocalized fear on the part of US military planners, of a military confrontation with China… in Africa. Today it’s Libya, but tomorrow, it will be in Sudan. Does this sound a little familiar? Well, it should…

THE NEW COLD WAR WITH CHINA

What this data does show clearly is that the strategic policy objectives outlined in Washington’s AFRICOM, particularly those ones designed to confront and minimize China’s economic interest in Africa, are working well as a result of instability in the region. In effect, what we are witnessing here is the dawn of a new Cold War between the US-EURO powers and China. This new cold war will feature many of the same elements of the long and protracted US-USSR face-off we saw in the second half of the 20th century. It will take place off shore, in places like Africa, South America, Central Asia and through old flashpoints like Korea and the Middle East.

AFRICOM: outlining America’s new military playground.

What makes this new cold war much deeper and more subtle than the previous one, is that it will not be cloaked in a popular ideology like ‘Capitalism vs Communism’. This new war is all about one thing: natural resources. The capture and control of the world’s remaining resources and energy supplies will be the theme which will govern- and literally fuel, all major conflicts in the 21st century. It will be fought through numerous proxies, and on far-flung pitches across the globe but it will never be spoken of by the White House Press Secretary or the Foreign Office in Downing Street.

INSURGENTS NOT PROTESTERS

The great PR spin trick in the run up to NATO’s carpet bombing run in Libya was the West’s ability to characterize Libya’s violent armed gangs as mere protesters. The average American, British or French media consumer equated the Libyan uprising with those previously in Tunisia and Egypt. Then reality of course was that they were anything but. However, the bells of freedom and democracy had indeed rung, so all that was really needed at that point was a clever WMD-like diplomatic trick to dazzle the rows of intellectually challenged diplomats at the UN in New York City. The ‘No Fly Zone’ was repackaged and worked well enough for politicians to get their foot in the door to their respective War Rooms.

It seems to have worked so far but the next phase- ground troops and a NATO military occupation of Libya, will be somewhat more complicated to execute without sustaining heavy political fallout. All of these complex efforts are used to shroud western corporate and military long-term agendas in the region, all part and parcel of the New Resources Cold War with China.

A military and CIA advocate appears on CNN to promote the White House party line on regime change.

HISTORY IS STILL A BITCH

Few will argue that the average western observer and mainstream media consumer suffers from chronic historical amnesia. For Americans in particular, relevant history only extends as far back as the previous season of Dancing With the Stars, or American Idol. Some might argue that this is by design, that on whole the masses have been conditioned to be passive actors in the new media-rich modern democracy because it makes managing the herds much easier.

The lessons of Afghanistan and Iraq have yet to return home for the US and Great Britain- both projects are still going concerns for the massive cartel of western corporations. This has allowed ambitious bureaucrats in Washington, London and Paris to try their hand again in Libya. In time however, Americans and Europeans will come to learn what ever citizen and subject already learned many times over throughout history. In theory it may work, but in practice, “Occupation” is a paradox. The US-UK may draw plans in private to occupy an Iraq or a Libya indefinitely but history doesn’t jibe with these imperial ambitions.

It will end one day, and end badly because the Neo-Roman Anglo-American Empire with all its legions abroad, cannot manage its fragile domestic affair back at home. First comes the fall of the Senate, then the rise of the Caesar, and finally the collapse of the Denarius($) at home. The once great empire goes out with a whimper- too fat and too bankrupt to carry on.

As the Great Resource Wars of the 21st century continue to rage on unabated, one question comes to mind: what will mindful citizens in the aggressor countries do to change this present course of history? Judging by ease at which the West managed to pull of their latest heist in Libya, I would say… very little right now.

Patrick Henningsen’s article first appeared on 21st Century Wire.

http://www.infowars.com/west-vs-china-a-new-cold-war-begins-on-libyan-soil/
 

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It's a real stretch to think that because finances are involved in the strategy of the war that bankers are somehow at the helm.
Ouch...

You need to read up on this relationship some more.
It's not tin foil hat stuff.
It was well known to republics, historians and banks.

http://www.xat.org/xat/moneyhistory.html
just a quick one here. Plenty more available.

and any history of capitalism and war relationships searches.

Set some time aside and dig a little.

It's very good reading, and you will be very impressed, and refreshed.

I really, really, really...... recommend it.
 

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Ouch...

You need to read up on this relationship some more.
It's not tin foil hat stuff.
It was well known to republics, historians and banks.

http://www.xat.org/xat/moneyhistory.html
just a quick one here. Plenty more available.

and any history of capitalism and war relationships searches.

Set some time aside and dig a little.

It's very good reading, and you will be very impressed, and refreshed.

I really, really, really...... recommend it.
:thumbsup: Don't read this Tex.. you will pop an O-ring.. :laughing:
 

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:thumbsup: Don't read this Tex.. you will pop an O-ring.. :laughing:
I read part one and scanned part two. I decided to spend my time more productively, so I'm going to go sort my sock drawer. :laughing:
 

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I read part one and scanned part two. I decided to spend my time more productively, so I'm going to go sort my sock drawer. :laughing:
:laughing: Don;t you have an episode of American Idol on the DVR that you haven't watched yet?

Run down the road and pick up your "I like Mitt" button.. :devil:
 
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