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Discussion Starter #1
heres an old post that cover much of the info, LOOK THRU THE LINKS
a decent arc or stick welder will do a good deal of whats likely to need welding, an oxyacetolene torch is versital, a mig is really easy to master and a good tig will handle about anything you can name plus aluminum

http://www.twi.co.uk/j32k/protected/band_3/jk6.html
TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas Welding)

basically youve got a controlable electric arc in a gas shield that you use similar to a oxy-acetolene flame to melt the material and feed a rod of similar material to flow and join the peices
This process is the toughest to learn. The electrode is composed of Tungsten, and a current is flowed through it controlled by either a foot pedal, a hand switch, or a fixed current on the machine itself. I am learning TIG using a foot pedal, the more you press down on the metal, the more amps you get. Once you get enough current flowing to get an appropriate sized weld pool, you start dabbing a filler metal into the puddle as you move the electrode further down the work piece. TIG allows you a great amount of control because you regulate how much current the electrode gets and how much filler metal the weld pool gets. This process is very slow compared to the other types though. in my opinion its by far the best process simply because you can CONTROL BOTH THE HEAT POLARITY AND MATERIAL FEED CONSTANTLY MAKING ADJUSTMENTS IN BOTH SHOULD YOU CHOOSE
MIG - (Metal Inert Gas)
http://www.twi.co.uk/j32k/protected/band_3/jk4.html



MIG is the easiest process of welding. A feeding gun is used to feed a spool of filler metal wire into the weld pool. in effect you feed a charged wire into the weld are where it melts on contact due to the current arc ,Current is usually switched on and off by means of a trigger on the gun. Amps are usually controlled by a dial on the MIG machine itself, meaning that you cannot adjust current in the middle of welding. Though, with some machine you are able to get a foot pedal to control Amps while welding.the better machines allow you to vary the speed of the wire feed but you set the electrical energy (heat with a dial), its extremely fast and simple to use but your basicall shooting molten wire into the area to be welded.
Arc Welding (stick)

Arc welding is mostly used in industrial applications. An electrode is used to strike an arc, the electrode then melts away to deposit metal into the weld pool. The electrode is coated with a variety of different materials which are used to help keep the weld pool from being contaminated.
TIG and non-flux-cored MIG both use a variety of different shielding gases to help keep the weld pool from being contaminated depending on what metal is being welding

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Ive got 4 welders in my shop, the MILLER 330 amp TIG, I have uses ARGON.
but ID bet 70% of the welding get done with my lincoln arc welder, (like this below)

http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=K1419-4

ive got a LINCOLN MIG and a HOBART 210 amp also (soon to be replaced with a MILER 252 MIG)

example of how handy it is to have around, I welded up a heavy duty cart for the tig welder to hold the well over 700lbs and the tank of argon , total cost was less than $40 in steel and (4) $12 ...500 lb rated... 8" swivel roller wheels, the factory option cart was over $200
I saved at least $100 PLUS its a much better built cart


http://www.metalmeet.com/

http://www.hobartwelders.com/mboard/

http://www.millermotorsports.com/mboard/forumdisplay.php?f=3


http://www.htpweld.com/

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/

http://www.millerwelds.com/products/
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I can,t imagine a decent shop without a welder of some kind, the oxy-acetolene torch or a decent stick welder at a minimum, the only real things to avoid are the OFF brands (stick with the name brands, simply because welders last for years and you want to have replacement parts available in a few years) and welders that don,t require a 220 volt feed, should be avouided in most shops, Ive never seen a 110 volt welder that had the full capacity to do the job correctly on anything thicker than about 1/4 inch thick mild steel and even then its a stretch in most cases

ID stick to :thumbsup:

MILLER
LINCOLN
HTP
HOBART
ESAB

you don,t need to spend a huge amount of cash

http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=907312


http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=K1297

http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=K2472-1


http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=500526

http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=10-3073A-1&Category_Code=THARC


http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=907321

yeah spending $500-$2500 on a welder may seem crazy to some guys, but youll easily save that much and more fabricating a few stainless custom exhaust systems, and doing repairs and making things around the shop. for you and your friends corvettes, and the uses are almost unlimited
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I got asked what IVE got in the shop,first Id point out IM not an expert but I have been welding for 35 PLUS years


I have aquired a few welders in the shop over the years , the oxy-acetolene torch in my opinion is a great asset, but the two fairly recent additions make me wonder how I ever got along without them before



I picked up the newest MIG, a MILLER 252 last week, while its too new to the shop to be totally tested yet, its obviously a huge improvement over my previous mig welders



http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=907321



this is my lincoln stick welder/generator, its done a great job for years and I sure keeping this one



http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=K1419-4





I picked up an OLD 1980s MILLER 330a/bp TIG welder awhile ago,

and while its hardly state of the art, its a good useable tool.

while Id recommend the newer miller or LINCOLN or HTP tigs (having used those)if you have the significant cash to spend, the older TIG does a decent job at less than 1/6 of the cost



http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=K1825-1



http://www.htpweld.com/products/tig_welders/tig201.html



http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=907194041





you might ask WHY? I need more than one welder,well, I don,t NEED them all but it sure is nice to have the correct tool for the job at hand, first each type of welder does one type of job better than all the others due to its design, and function.



a good tig welder will do about 99% of anything you can imagine, when set up correctly with the correct guy useing it, like an oxy-acetolene torch ,that has the heat seperate from the filler metal supply. a tig is basically an electric flame inside a gas curtain shield that you use to heat the metal and then use sticks of filler rod. a tig will work on stainless, aluminum, mild steel, even some other metals.



its main fault is the machines cost, and it requires a gas shield, but keep in mind many TIG welders can have a standard STICK WELDER function with an addition of a seperate lead so you dont need the gas to stick weld, and generally can control the arc with a foot petal.



a oxy-acetolene torch will do a great deal, and for things like heating & bending, brazeing, etc. that some other welders don,t do as easily, its sure handy



a basic stick welder will allow you to do a great deal on steel, but its basically not designed for any aluminum, brazeing ETC.



QUALITY MIG welders are generally the easiest to learn on, and nearly fool proff after some basic instruction and practice, the bigger and more advanced designs can do stainless and aluminum and have a gas shield like the tig to keep the weld clean



now IM sure some of you noticed I didn,t mention the 110 volt hobby welders like home depot and sear sell? well Ive used those welders, I own a lincoln 3200 weldpack welder, and its a good little sheet metal welder......but read this



Taken directly from a Joe Kalassa , a welding instructor from Lincoln Eletric



"“Some teams fail to achieve proper fusion, which basically happens, for instance, when you take a little 110-volt welding machine and work on heavy things like shock mounts,” Kolasa says. “Some people feel they can do anything they want with one of the smaller machines that is intended for thin materials. If you were to use that machine when it comes to something like a shock mount, you might as well skip welding it and just stick some bubble gum there instead because it won’t work. It’s a misunderstanding of the welding process that comes from a lack of education.”


BTW my neighbor owns a lincoln 2300 weldpack 110 volt mig/flux welder
its decent for sheet metal repairs after you practice awhile....it will do up to about 1/4 mild steel if you can get to both sides of the seam, but its a joke on somethings like suspension brackets, it just can,t get the heat necessary to form a deep penetrating weld
 

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Thanks for the write up, I'm saving up to buy a welder and take a $400 class at a vocational school to learn welding and this has been very helpfull!

:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
if your just starting out the schools an excellent Idea, I probably should go take a recent welding school, the last one I aced but that was in 1967:laughing:
ask questions and try to get a good bit of welding time on all the styles of welders, personally I prefer the oxy-acetolene torch and TIG but the better mig welders are extremely versital, and do a good job and are really easy to operate., the stick welders are usually the cheapest and don,t over look the better stick welders, you can do an amazing amount of things once you get good with one:thumbsup: a stick welder and the oxy-acetolene torch were all I had for years
(probably made a pest of my self at times doing small repairs with a buddies TIG)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
yeah! IM a mild tool freak!
I love to equip the shop with all the tools I can get access too!
and I love gaining new skills

the TIG may be slower but its the supperior process in my opinion, in fact TIG is REQUIRED and the ONLY method allowed on some critical suspension components in some racing formats, if I could only have two welders it would be a 250-350 amp TIG and the OXY-ACETOLENE torch.
I bought a USED (late 1980s)330 amp MILLER INDUSTRIAL TIG and Im still learning to use it correctly, It cost me approximately 1K but it works very well and a NEW similar capacity TIG would be over 6K.
Ive got several welders in the shop, each has its area of use where its supperior in some way to the others, but the OXY-ACETOLENE torch and the TIG will do 99% of all welding, the MIG welders fast and easy, but not as precise, (Im still getting used to useing it)the STICK welder has been in the shop for years, gets used alot when looks are not critical, but the mig could replace it.
I can,t imaging a decent tool list in a shop, without a couple welders, they get constant use, everything from fabricating parts to welding nuts on broken bolts to make removal possiable
 

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Discussion Starter #8
"Anybody on this thread know where to seek instruction or recommend a course on how to build skills with a welder?"



well many colleges,and trade schools have adult night classes, you can take, and MILLER welding sells CDs with info and hints, but in most cases Id say take a class of find an experianced welding shop and offer the guy some cash for a quick instruction , but the truth is the best teacher will be to find an experianced welder whos a corvette / hotrod club member in a club near you and have him instruct you, then PRACTICE on scrap a good deal with your equipment, find some old bits of exhaust tubing an old fender a frame ETC and just see what works.

ask questions here
http://www.millermotorsports.com/mboard/forumdisplay.php?f=3

http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtalk/

books

http://www.amazon.com/Welders-Handbook-RevisedHP1513-Cutting-Oxyacetylene/dp/1557885133/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-3486570-0918205?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191511556&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.com/Welding-Basics-Creative-Publishing-international/dp/1589231392/ref=pd_sim_b_shvl_img_1/103-3486570-0918205

http://www.amazon.com/Welders-Handbook-RevisedHP1513-Cutting-Oxyacetylene/dp/1557885133/ref=pd_sim_b_shvl_img_4/103-3486570-0918205
 

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110 v. Lincoln WeldPak

The 110 v. Lincoln mig is one of those " you get what you pay for" deals. It's harder to run a good bead with it compared to a more expensive machine. But, it's great for minor light fab work. I wouldn't do any thing critical on a car with it. I don't touch frames or suspension with anything but a TIG anyway.

I bought a 110 v. WeldPak something like 15 years ago at Costco for $199, added the MIG conversion and bottle for about $150. For that kind of money and 15 years, it was worth it.
The best thing about this welder is that it's small enough to throw into the trailer and tale to the race track for emergencys.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
http://www.metalgeek.com/static/cope.pcgi
this comes in really handy building a roll cage



http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=42324

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=35336

this comes in handy at times

AS EXAMPLEs ILL LIST SOME DECENT SOURCES OF WELDERS



http://www.smithequipment.com/products.htm
PHONE: (605) 882-3200
quality oxy-acetolene torches

http://www.htpweld.com/
Phone:
1-800-USA-WELD (toll free)
(847)357-0700
QUALITY WELDERS(nice 200 amp TIG)

http://www.esabna.com/products/arc-w...HDQQodJR xJSg
1-800-ESAB-123
(1-800-372-2123)
QUALITY WELDERS (nice 250-350 AMP TIGS)

http://www.millerwelds.com/
Phone: 920-734-9821
QUALITY WELDERS (MIGS,TIGS, DARN NEAR EVERYTHING)


http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Cat...ecobrowse.aspx
216-481-8100
QUALITY WELDERS(MIGS,TIGS, DARN NEAR EVERYTHING)
 
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