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Never gonna happen! GM is too strapped for cash and from all the recents recalls couldn't build a car if they tried. The C8 will continue on as a front engine V8. JMHO.
 

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I was wondering when this would get posted here. I saw it a few days ago, and almost considered posting it... but of course, we all know mid-engine rumors have existed for half a century now and this article is completely unsubstantiated. Although, they seem have updated the artist's interpretation of what it could look like since I first saw the article, and I have to say... the car in these renderings is completely badass:


 

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+1 in the "ain't gonna happen soon" camp. While I wouldn't completely rule it out years down the line, right now the business model makes zero sense. Let's see, let's spend a ton of money we don't have to produce a car we won't ever sell enough of to make it profitable.

Nope.

And yes, I understand that some of the technology produced and lessons learned could (and surely would) benefit other GM vehicles . . . But not, in my opinion, enough to justify the investment. Personally, I would certainly consider a mid-engined Corvette - and for the love of God, could we PLEASE not have the usual "the Corvette already IS mid-engined" crowd chime in at this point? When mid-engined cars are discussed, the vast majority of people mean a car with the engine behind the driver. Yes, technically there are front-engined, front mid-engined, rear mid-engined, and rear-engined cars. We get that, OK?

But a mid-engined Corvette is bound to be a VERY expensive car . . . Too expensive, I think, to sell enough units to justify it. Adding it as a second model, high-performance version of the Corvette would help spread the R&D and tooling costs- I'm sure a lot could be shared with the new car's more conventional stablemate. I have some serious misgivings about a "shared platform" that could function with the engine at either end (or both? Now THAT would be interesting). Compromises rarely excel at anything.

So OK, we'll stay tuned . . . But as everyone has said, we've been hearing this particular song for decades now. While I'm sure it's tempting to speculate that GM has registered the "Zora" name for a car, and any serious student of Corvette history knows that a mid-engined Corvette was what Zora really wanted . . . Let's not read too much into it.

Yet.
 

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mid engine corvette would be a $100,000+ base price for it to work. my opinion - front/mid engine is here to stay. not mid/rear.
 

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mid engine corvette would be a $100,000+ base price for it to work. my opinion - front/mid engine is here to stay. not mid/rear.
The article puts the base price at double that. Say this out loud "Two Hundred Thousand Dollar Chevrolet." Doesn't feel natural does it?
 

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that's what I get for not reading the article :laughing: $200,000 for a chevy? no ****ing way!
 
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Making a rear mid engine Corvette isn't as hard as some people may think it is. When you think about it take the current Corvette and move the engine to behind the drive and push the passenger compartment forward a bit to make room. "but they will have to develop an all new chassis" they developed an all chassis for the C7 and it didn't cause the car to cost $100,000.... . You would also remove the cost of the torque tube as well so you may argue that it would be a bit cheaper.

As far as will this happen? there have been rumors that there will be a mid engine Corvette for a long time now. It has never happened and yet when ever these rumors come up people still believe them for some odd reason.

We should all know that when they develop a new car that they look at different layouts (front mid vs rear mid) and even look at different engines (V-8 vs TT V-6). The C4 Corvette almost got a TT V-6 engine and the C7 almost got a TT V-6 engine as well. They looked at producing a TT V-6 that makes about 450-460BHP and looked at the benefits of doing so over the LT1 engine and found none.

Fact is if the goal is to produce a car that is 50/50 then rear mid is out of the question anyways. They would have to ditch a 50/50 weight split if they are going to make a rear mid Corvette. The best that I have seen from a rear mid layout was 47/53......
 

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Making a rear mid engine Corvette isn't as hard as some people may think it is. When you think about it take the current Corvette and move the engine to behind the drive and push the passenger compartment forward a bit to make room. "but they will have to develop an all new chassis" they developed an all chassis for the C7 and it didn't cause the car to cost $100,000.... . You would also remove the cost of the torque tube as well so you may argue that it would be a bit cheaper.

As far as will this happen? there have been rumors that there will be a mid engine Corvette for a long time now. It has never happened and yet when ever these rumors come up people still believe them for some odd reason.

We should all know that when they develop a new car that they look at different layouts (front mid vs rear mid) and even look at different engines (V-8 vs TT V-6). The C4 Corvette almost got a TT V-6 engine and the C7 almost got a TT V-6 engine as well. They looked at producing a TT V-6 that makes about 450-460BHP and looked at the benefits of doing so over the LT1 engine and found none.

Fact is if the goal is to produce a car that is 50/50 then rear mid is out of the question anyways. They would have to ditch a 50/50 weight split if they are going to make a rear mid Corvette. The best that I have seen from a rear mid layout was 47/53......
$200k isn't my number its Motortrend's. Secondly TTV6 is usually bandied about when talking future Corvettes I just mentioned my surprise at it missing from this article.

I seriously think the only reason most of the car mags want a mid-engined Corvette is so they can really flog an exotic beast without supervision. Something they can't do with the current crop of Europeans.
 

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IMO, probably not the actual parts from the Volt, but Volt lessons learned and bit of tech could provide some short bursts for the front wells for cornering. The front drive system would need to be as light or lighter than a traditional AWD system. Also probably a default setting of some kind that can enable an MPG benefit.

A rear mid has to be sold to the BOD. At least a half dozen rear mid proposals have died on the way to, or in the Board Room since the mid sixties. If this one lives, it needs more Econ Tech to swing more votes. Performance alone will not give it life IMO.
 

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Making a rear mid engine Corvette isn't as hard as some people may think it is. When you think about it take the current Corvette and move the engine to behind the drive and push the passenger compartment forward a bit to make room. "but they will have to develop an all new chassis" they developed an all chassis for the C7 and it didn't cause the car to cost $100,000.... . You would also remove the cost of the torque tube as well so you may argue that it would be a bit cheaper.

As far as will this happen? there have been rumors that there will be a mid engine Corvette for a long time now. It has never happened and yet when ever these rumors come up people still believe them for some odd reason.

We should all know that when they develop a new car that they look at different layouts (front mid vs rear mid) and even look at different engines (V-8 vs TT V-6). The C4 Corvette almost got a TT V-6 engine and the C7 almost got a TT V-6 engine as well. They looked at producing a TT V-6 that makes about 450-460BHP and looked at the benefits of doing so over the LT1 engine and found none.

Fact is if the goal is to produce a car that is 50/50 then rear mid is out of the question anyways. They would have to ditch a 50/50 weight split if they are going to make a rear mid Corvette. The best that I have seen from a rear mid layout was 47/53......

The C6 Chassis was the foundation for the C7 the changes were evolutionary, I think the point is a mid engine car is a completely fresh blank slate design, the C7 was not.

You will gain rear bias with a rear mid design, the supposed large advantage is the moment of inertia reduction by having the largest mass at the center of the wheelbase. My personal thoughts on that are that it's a great concept especially in a fighter jet. But I am not sure how much difference it makes on the road where traction is the limiting factor. Corvette already post comparable if not superior numbers to it's rear mid competitors, while maintaining a much lower price point and maintaining the ability for just about anyone to work on.
 

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Let's also bear in mind how most current Corvette owners use their cars . . . While items such as every-day liveability, space for some luggage, and (relative) ease of maintenance are not typically the hot-button issues where high-performance sports cars are concerned, they ARE part of the current Corvette's persona. To ignore all of that and go in an entirely different direction obviously changes the car in fundamental ways. While this may or may not be a good thing, it represents a game-changer as far as the Corvette is concerned.

No mid-engined car will be able to provide the easy-to-live-with personality of the current configuration. Yes, there would be enhanced performance - but how usable, and for whom? Is this where Corvette needs to go, and if it does, how many potential buyers would be left behind? The high development costs and initial price point have been arguments many have used over the years against a mid-engined Corvette, and they are still valid arguments - but I would also add that a mid-engined Corvette will involve some serious compromises to what the car has always provided . . . A serious sports car that provides epic performance and every-day, real-world usability that can be taken on short or long trips, used as an every-day driver, and be serviced at thousands of Chevrolet dealers nationwide. I'm certainly not afraid of a mid-engined Corvette- in fact, I would be a potential buyer for one - but I don't want to find myself standing in such a short line that the marque cannot survive.

Just my opinion, of course.
 

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Let's also bear in mind how most current Corvette owners use their cars . . . While items such as every-day liveability, space for some luggage, and (relative) ease of maintenance are not typically the hot-button issues where high-performance sports cars are concerned, they ARE part of the current Corvette's persona. To ignore all of that and go in an entirely different direction obviously changes the car in fundamental ways. While this may or may not be a good thing, it represents a game-changer as far as the Corvette is concerned.

No mid-engined car will be able to provide the easy-to-live-with personality of the current configuration. Yes, there would be enhanced performance - but how usable, and for whom? Is this where Corvette needs to go, and if it does, how many potential buyers would be left behind? The high development costs and initial price point have been arguments many have used over the years against a mid-engined Corvette, and they are still valid arguments - but I would also add that a mid-engined Corvette will involve some serious compromises to what the car has always provided . . . A serious sports car that provides epic performance and every-day, real-world usability that can be taken on short or long trips, used as an every-day driver, and be serviced at thousands of Chevrolet dealers nationwide. I'm certainly not afraid of a mid-engined Corvette- in fact, I would be a potential buyer for one - but I don't want to find myself standing in such a short line that the marque cannot survive.

Just my opinion, of course.
All true - which is why a C8 Rear-mid could only be offered as part of an expanded Corvette line, leaving the C7 (can't wait for a new design) Front mid as the bread and butter volume car of the Corvette line - as per the article this thread references.

Once you get to the low-exotic pricing that a C8 would demand, owners expectations and use habits change significantly from those of us who drive our vettes to work daily.

If they ever do take their exotics on trips, the concierge fed ex's their luggage to their next hotel.

That said, I still think it would be hard to get the BOD to approve it.

BTW, the article also mentioned Cadillac's need for a halo car. Cad is currently developing a REAL world class top-of-the-line, top-of-the-tech halo sedan that will, no doubt have a V model that will become the Halo car for Cad. IMO, this is a much better Halo car for Cad, than a sports car that very few Cad owners could give a crap about - they need/want a back seat.

Be honest - do you really think the existence of an SL550 really sells a significant number of C, E, & S class cars? I don't think it does. Does the R8 really create a higher volume of A8 sales? I doubt it. Does Corvette's existence sell more Cruses and Malibus?
 

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I definitely agree that the halo Cadillac needs to be a sedan, in the old Fleetwood Sixty Special mode, with perhaps some Eldorado Brougham overtones. A "sporty" Cadillac has a market. A "sports car" Cadillac? Not so much. Trying to compete with the Mercedes SL roadsters led Cadillac down not one, but two blind alleys. Enough of that.

I do have some concerns about the viability of a multi-model Corvette line, with a mid-rear-engined supercar model positioned above a front-mid-engined C7 successor. And in any case, I also agree that the Board of Directors would give it a fast and hard thumbs-down anyway . . . So it's a moot point.

And on we go.
 
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