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Just found out that i have some play, I can wobble the yolk coming out the of the transmission. Do I need to remove the transmission, or can I pull the driveshaft and yolk and replace it without any trans damage?

Car is a 1971 LT-1, 4 speed
 

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Hi Dan
I just finished up a M-22X rebuild about 5 minutes ago! You can remove the drive shaft and pull the slip yoke out of the trans and check it. There is a seal in the tailhousing and a bushing. Chances are if the slip yoke is grooved you need to replace the seal, bushing, and yoke. The seal is doable in the car, the bushing would require a special tool made by Snap On to remove in the car. You're probably best off to remove the trans, then the tailhousing if you find it scored. The yoke just rides on the splines of the main shaft which usually doesn't wear.



This is looking into the tail. The bushing is at the bottom in the housing bore.

 

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Sorry Dan, I never used it. I always just pulled the trans. Usually that need a clean up and maybe reseal anyway.

Years ago when there were electric motor repair shops around I would have the worn yokes spray welded and turned to size. I have one like this in my 69 that I did back in 1982 and it's as good today as when done. I traded the guy a couple of tool bits for the job. Now the shop and guy are gone.
 

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I did it years ago with a tool I made using a vise and a file- I'll do my best to remember to photograph it and post pictures of the tool tonight.

I made it out of ordinary 1/2" x 1/8" or 1/2" x 3/16" steel bar stock and a simple bolt from the hardware store. It connects to a slide hammer to pull out the bushing.

Most good auto parts stores (O'Reillys, NAPA) should have the bushing, and of course you can get it online.
 

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OK, here you go. I used this tool to pull my bearing with the transmission in the car. The way this works is to insert one of each of these on the left and one on the right between the bearing and the output shaft to hook the sleeve (the lip seal has to be removed first, of course). Take some popsicle sticks or more metal shims and wedge them gently between the output shaft and the new hooks to lightly seat them against the bearing so they engage the bearing instead of slip past it. Insert a grade 8 1/4" bolt through the holes in the other end of the bars. Use a hook or loop attachment on the end of a slide hammer to engage the bolt (between the straps) to pull the sleeve bearing out. As you can see, it is made from 1/8" x 1/2" hot rolled mild steel.





To make it, leave yourself 6-8" of bar stock and bend the end at a sharp 90 degree bend, then cut it off with 1/8" or more of the bend remaining. The reason for the bend is twofold- first, the work hardening of the metal helps strengthen the lip that will be the working edge. Second, it leaves a little extra "meat" to work with on the lip. File it so that it's slightly concave. Next, file the flat part of the strap so that it is round and smooth, as close as possible to the radius of the ID of the bearing. Make the inside step as flat as possible, dressing it with the side of the file. The inside corner of the step should be fairly square, and the lip should be left fairly sharp.







Last, place the two side-by-side so that the two teeth line up exactly across from each other (similar to above). Drill a 1/4" hole through both pieces on the other end.
 

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Nice tool:thumbsup: I wonder if you could hook it up to a center puller to press against the mainshaft and pull out the bushing? Probably would work.
 

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Thanks!

I don't see why not! If you could get it bolted to the puller, keep the straps centered and still have the jackscrew running through the center somehow, probably so!
 

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I can't open U-tube sorry I can't help. If the slip yoke is smooth, no deep grooves it should be ok. If it's scuffed then it can be polished in a lathe or with a emery roll by hand.

The bushings usually get gouged but they are not a machine fit to the yokes by any means.
 

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Since yoke wobble can be subjective, I took some video. Is this to much movement, or is this what it should be?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XPiyt_cCyw&feature=youtu.be
It looks like the whole back end of the trans is moving as evidenced by the exhaust pipes moving too. You need to repeat the test by holding the trans immobile.

On the other hand, pull the yoke and measure its diameter - if there is any reduction of yoke diameter where it passes through the bushing, the bushing needs to be changed too.
 

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I had to 'bump' this thread...since my drive shaft is out, looks like I'll need to get my seal & bushing out and replaced :bang
EDIT...heck, maybe this homemade tool won't even apply to my trany :rolleyes:
 

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........The seal is doable in the car, the bushing would require a special tool made by Snap On to remove in the car...........
I have a leak out of the Muncie tailshaft on my '71 350/270.

Will replacing the seal, and not the bushing, stop the leak?

I don't want to pull the trans, at the moment.

Thanks
 

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Thanks!

I don't see why not! If you could get it bolted to the puller, keep the straps centered and still have the jackscrew running through the center somehow, probably so!
Following up on Gary's excellent suggestion to attach the straps to a center puller, and me being a gadget guy, what do you think of this addition to the setup?

I'm thinking a variation of a turnbuckle in the form of a slotted hex sleeve nut of the correct size in the right place can be used to keep the straps separated and centered.

The puller bolt would slide through the slot in the sleeve nut and all-thread rods threaded into both ends of the sleeve nut would then be attached to the straps with adjusting nuts.

That setup would stiffen the straps and help keep the lip of the straps from slipping off the bushing. Looks like the closer to the lip of the straps the turnbuckle can be placed, the better it will work.

But it would take actually building the whole tool and using it to find out if the idea of attaching the turnbuckle to the tool worked or not. Variables like strap stiffness, properly locating the turnbuckle, etc. would make or break the idea. Yet, IMO, I think it's a simple enough mod to make it worthwhile to give it a try.

edit - Oh, and uhh, pardon the picky side of me, but the shape of the nicely done radius work on the straps looks to be convex rather than concave. ;)

 

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I have a leak out of the Muncie tailshaft on my '71 350/270.

Will replacing the seal, and not the bushing, stop the leak?

I don't want to pull the trans, at the moment.

Thanks
slide out the slip yoke and look at the OD, if it's chewed up then the bushing is too and most likely it will leak. Snap On made the tool to get in there, if you look up Jack Panzica's thread on his recent diff rebuild he found one on ebay and used it.
 
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