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Discussion Starter #1
OK guys
i'm sure this question has been asked before but i'm new so please humor me. looking to replace my brakes potentially with an after-market kit. but money doesn't grow on trees so nothing fancy.
15" stock ralleys,250 hrse l-48(350 to wheels later)

no racing just spirited driving every other day.
rarely with speeds above 80 mph. but i wanna know the brakes are there when i need them. next i'd like to replace the rotors but i don't see alot of options. 15" stock ralleys .250 hrse l-48
also looking for a straight bolt on no fab set
sooo?
heres what ive found. opinions,ideas,comments.

1. new (stock) ac-delco's
http://www.ecklers.com/corvette-new-castings-brake-caliper-set-acdelco-1965-1982.html

2. stainless performance kit
http://www.ssbrakes.com/commerce/detail/index.cfm?nPID=8224

3. wilwood
http://www.wilwood.com/BrakeKits/BrakeKitsProdFront.aspx?itemno=140-10789

and don't laugh now but can i do the front set first or is it a all at once deal

thnx in advance
J:huh:
 

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Based on the type of driving you are going to do (no racing) and the money involved in changing the brake system, I guess, my first question is why do you want to replace the stock brake system which even today is superior to most cars on the road:

Front: 12 inch rotors (11.75 inch to be exact), vented.
4 piston calipers

Rear: 12 inch vented rotors
4 piston calipers (slightly smaller pistons than the front calipers)

I would suggest that you keep the OEM system which is very reliable and terrific once you get it operating correctly. The real weak point of the system is the leaking OEM calipers but once you switch to stainless steel sleeved calipers-no issues. I have had my VBP SS calipers on my car since 1986-no issues.

The two easiest ways to upgrade the brakes which is not necessary since the brakes are that GOOD stock is to replace the brake pads with a set of high performance carbon metallic pads like Hawk HPS or Performance Friction pads and to install a front and rear set of braided stainless steel hoses in place of the rubber hoses which expand under brake pressure and effect brake feel. Change the brake fluid every 2-3 years religiously and you are good to go!

These 2 changes will greatly improve the braking distances which again are excellent with stock brakes.

The next change you could possibly make to the OEM system is to replace the rotors with slotted ones (or drilled ones or both drilled and slotted). This step requires more work on the rear rotors because you have to have the correct rotor runout on the rear trailing arms-I have not and do not plan to do this step until my OEM rotors need replacing which probably will not be for a long time.

Hope that this helps!
 

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Stock brakes are excellent when working right. No need to customize for something driven like an L48 was meant to be driven. (friendly poke from a fellow L48 sufferer!) Go for the stainless bushed calipers and don't look back.

If you're on a super tight budget take a caliper apart and see if it's already stainless sleeved and just needs a seal kit. Somebody may have done the sleeving for you, as the OE calipers probably failed during the 80s.

Good luck either way!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I like the wilwoods but i'd only be able to do the fronts first.
for the same money i can do the front and rear if i go with new ac-delco's.
my biggest concern is my mechanic abilities aren't the best.
i have no problem changing out calipers and rotors but I've heard that if i change the rotors then i need to check runout

but i have no clue what that is or how to check it and i know i don't have the tools to check run out so i'm looking for a direct bolt on solution.
by the way I've already drilled and pulled the rear rotors to deal with a e-brake issue. but i didnt know i had to check the runout
and just reinstalled them and they seem fine

thnx
j
 

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stainless lines with a hydroboost here.....omg! Awesome power!
I just want folks to be aware that hydroboost will NOT make your car stop shorter. Hydroboost increases the "power" brake effect and the brake pedal feel but will do nothing for braking distances. The limiting factor for decreasing brakes distances is the brake system design-in the case of the C3: 4 piston calipers at all wheels and 12 inch rotors.

Changing brake pad material can effect the brakes effectiveness but short of changing to a different design caliper (wilwood) and larger rotors, adding a power brake booster (hydroboost) will NOT shorten braking distances.

Just to be clear and eliminate any confusion about hydroboost systems!
 

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just starting my brake rebuild

hydroboost from DB 200 bucks
lines and fittings 150
O ring caliper kit from vette brakes and products on sale for 340
new rotors from VB&P on sale 159 for all 4.

total 800ish

get the O ring calipers and run out is less of a problem
to check the run out you need a dial caliper on a base. put the tip against the rotor and spin in. watch the dial to see if it moves in or out.
 

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If your mechanic abilities aren't the best stick with stock parts and have a shop that works on old cars turn the rotors for you. Don't mess with the local parts store that also turns rotors for ten bucks.

The runout check after drilling and remounting the rears- mine seemed to fit just as tightly as a modern car's hat rotor, and those aren't an issue. You may be overthinking things.

If you go the wilwood route and do one end at a time, be prepared for some weird brake bias in the meanwhile. And you may not even like the bias with the wilwood setup and end up needing an adjustable prop valve.

I just can't see a reason to go wilwood in your case other than the bling factor. Not that there's anything wrong with that. :D
 

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I just can't see a reason to go wilwood in your case other than the bling factor. Not that there's anything wrong with that. :D
A couple of advantages, unsprung weight and better clearance (at least on the back). I had to do a fair bit of grinding on the stock calipers to clear the last pair of wide rally wheels I had.

If you get the polished calipers they aren't much more than stock calipers.

just my 2 cents.
 

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and you can feel the "difference" ?
Yes. Much easier for this old man to change the calipers now. ;)

I took off old 15x10 stockton rally wheels (steel) and the stock calipers and installed lighter weight steel wheels and the willwods. I think it was 20lbs per corner I removed. The car steers, brakes, and handles a lot better. Is it the 80lbs I dropped? I don't know.

But, if you price o-ring stock calipers and the plain wilwoods, the price isn't much different. I got red, as the vendor substituted colored calipers at no cost. I guess they were out of the plain/polished units.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thanks for the advice guys.

I'm still undecided about the calipers but i think that's gonna end up being a tough call. i want the wilwoods but with the cost running at 500 per set. i'm leaning towards a stock set. should i go for ac-delcos or are they all the same

is there any advantages to buying new castings as opposed to remans? aka-a redesign for better performance or reliability.

what about rotors.
i need at least 1 new rotor due to damage from previous owner so i thought about replacing them all but a local mechanic told me to run from any rotor from a parts store due to quality issues.

sorry for so many questions but i love my vette and wanna do it right

THNX
J
:hump:
 

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You do not need new calipers, rebuilt SS calipers from any number of vendors (Midamerica, Ecklers, VBP, Muskeon Brake etc) offer quality rebuilt calipers. I bought mine from Vette Brakes and Products in 1985 remanufactured and still have them with zero issues. I do not have the newest innovation of the lip seal calipers but based on my original design seal calipers from 1985, you can make the call if you need lip seal calipers. My car sits most of the time which supposedly is the reason to have lip seal pistons. Mine have worked great without this innovation. Change the brake fluid every 2-3 years and you should be good to go.

As for rotors do not buy them from a mass retail place like Autozone, Pep boys, Advanced Auto parts. etc. I would get them from a quality on line internet company like Brake Performance :

http://brakeperformance.com/index.p...546_49547_65771&ad=froogle&dataload=1&sort=3a

They offer a lifetime warranty. I currently use a complete car set on my 2001 Grand prix which are notorious for eating rotors and my dimpled and slotted rotors are still not warpped at 35,000 miles with Performance Friction pads. You will need to check rotor runout on the rears if you replace them.

Hope that helps!
 

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Apples to apples here....

With the caliper sold in the "kit form" you get not only the new aluminum calipers, but also a full set of new pads and the SS hoses to go with it all.

And you can get all of it for quite a bit less than $500 also.
 
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