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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm painting my 1992 6speed because the original paint had cracks and scratches. I'm taking a course at Southtech Academy in Boynton Beach for minor dent repair and refinishing. So I have air tools and a spray booth to use. I DA'd the whole car with 320 grit and sanded down to the plastic on the rear bumper cover and some other spots where the cracks were and bondoed any imperfections and sanded them down. I'm ready to paint next week and I have a couple of questions. My teacher said to sand it down with 320 grit, I've heard that I should sand it down with 400 grit. which grit is the right one?
My teacher said to use a sealer then base coat and then clear coat. Is this correct or should I also use a primer? Don't get me wrong my teacher is great at what he does, but he doesn't do much painting anymore, he just does body and frame work. Which is why I am looking for a second opinion.



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I am not a painter and what you have done to your vette scares the **** out of me, however, there are some very good painters here and they will pop in soon. Hang in there.
I would think that you could paint right over what you've sanded with the exception of where it went past the paint and into the plastic bumper.
And by the way...

 

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In my experience painting my vette, I Wet sanded it down with a 320 grit and went up to 1000grit I belive. Then I Threw some primer on there and Repeated the wet sanding process. Then Base coat and more wet sanding with 1000 and then 2500 grit. Then clear coat and a final wet sand with 1000 and 2500 grit before buffing it out. For a first timer dont worry about getting runs becuase you always have the opportunity to fix any imperfections with just a little bit more wet sanding. I would also dis-assemble yor car to paint. Headlights out, front bumper off, rear bumper off etc.
check my pics to see my process.
Most important, PREP WORK IS EVERYTHING!!! Good luck!!
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I'm going to have to agree with Redmen031 on this one, as that's how I would do it as well, and will do it in about 8-10 months when my car is ready for a re-spray.
 

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Congrats on your decision to jump in there with both feet...One - to the Corvette world...TWO - to do your own P&B.

I am not a professional painter, but I have messed up enough cars to qualify as an expert.

First....Please take an extra day and disassemble the car. Remove all the lights, mirrors, side moldings, bumpers, upper window rubber, and even the BACK GLASS (so you have appropriate access to the channel around the rear window and the upper hinge recess).

Second...you are doing great, but I would highly suggest you now get a bucket of soapy water (refresh regularly) and block the car down with 400 wet. Pay special attention to the edges so they are all smooth and you get a good bond (otherwise paint will start to flake down the road from the edge of the doors, hood, etc).

Third, you only need to prime where you BREAK through the factory paint and can see the sealer/primer from underneath. You can simply spot it in here and there, then 400 block that until it is feathered in. If you have done any putty coat repair for stone chips...etc, you will need to spot prime there.

Fourth: Sealer is a great suggestion and it will reduce the chances of something popping through and reduce sanding scratches pulling through in the final coat...however, it adds mils to the car, and if you have only the original paint on the car now...I don't think you need it.

#5 - Tape it off like your life depends on it. Nothing will de-value that car more than having overspray primer/paint up on the hinge pillar, under the edges of the hood...inner fenders, spare tire...etc. The benefit of yanking the bumpers is to get them good and coated on the bottom side too - which many-a-great painters don't do, and the bottom of these vettes stay crusty and nasty. ALSO - take the rockers off and paint them separate, that way you don't have to virtually lay on your back to paint.

Hey...if you have time to spare, roll over to the Lakeland area mid week, and help me put the glossy stuff on my C4. I am a few steps ahead of where you are right now!

Good luck!
 

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Congrats on your decision to jump in there with both feet...One - to the Corvette world...TWO - to do your own P&B.

I am not a professional painter, but I have messed up enough cars to qualify as an expert.

First....Please take an extra day and disassemble the car. Remove all the lights, mirrors, side moldings, bumpers, upper window rubber, and even the BACK GLASS (so you have appropriate access to the channel around the rear window and the upper hinge recess).

Second...you are doing great, but I would highly suggest you now get a bucket of soapy water (refresh regularly) and block the car down with 400 wet. Pay special attention to the edges so they are all smooth and you get a good bond (otherwise paint will start to flake down the road from the edge of the doors, hood, etc).

Third, you only need to prime where you BREAK through the factory paint and can see the sealer/primer from underneath. You can simply spot it in here and there, then 400 block that until it is feathered in. If you have done any putty coat repair for stone chips...etc, you will need to spot prime there.

Fourth: Sealer is a great suggestion and it will reduce the chances of something popping through and reduce sanding scratches pulling through in the final coat...however, it adds mils to the car, and if you have only the original paint on the car now...I don't think you need it.

#5 - Tape it off like your life depends on it. Nothing will de-value that car more than having overspray primer/paint up on the hinge pillar, under the edges of the hood...inner fenders, spare tire...etc. The benefit of yanking the bumpers is to get them good and coated on the bottom side too - which many-a-great painters don't do, and the bottom of these vettes stay crusty and nasty. ALSO - take the rockers off and paint them separate, that way you don't have to virtually lay on your back to paint.

Hey...if you have time to spare, roll over to the Lakeland area mid week, and help me put the glossy stuff on my C4. I am a few steps ahead of where you are right now!

Good luck!
:agree: Taking the bumpers takes time but it is well worth it, and yes making everything off is verry important, if you dont you will be kicking your self in the :nuts:
 
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