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By: Byron York 12/10/10 8:29 AM
Chief Political Correspondent

There was an extraordinary scene at the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo Friday morning. The prize went to imprisoned Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, who was barred by the Chinese government from attending the ceremony. It was the first time since 1935 -- when the prize went to a winner imprisoned in one of Adolf Hitler's concentration camps -- that the Peace Prize winner or his repesentative did not appear personally to accept the award.* Liu's absence was symbolized by an empty chair on stage.

So on this notable occasion, the White House released a statement from President Obama on the awarding of the prize to Liu in absentia. And this is how Obama's statement began:

One year ago, I was humbled to receive the Nobel Peace Prize -- an award that speaks to our highest aspirations, and that has been claimed by giants of history and courageous advocates who have sacrificed for freedom and justice.

Critics have often said of Obama that "it's all about him," that he has a tendency to reference himself no matter what subject he is discussing. Could he do any more to prove them right? But just to show that he is, in fact, humble, the president followed his opening sentence with this:

Mr. Liu Xiaobo is far more deserving of this award than I was.

In the rest of his statement, Obama writes that "We respect China's extraordinary accomplishment in lifting millions out of poverty, and believe that human rights include the dignity that comes with freedom from want." But of course, Liu wasn't at the Nobel ceremony in Oslo because of the Chinese government, so Obama adds, "Mr. Liu reminds us that human dignity also depends upon the advance of democracy, open society, and the rule of law. The values he espouses are universal, his struggle is peaceful, and he should be released as soon as possible." And then, before closing, the president makes one more reference to himself:

I regret that Mr. Liu and his wife were denied the opportunity to attend the ceremony that Michelle and I attended last year.

Indeed.

*Some earlier winners, like Russian dissident Andrei Sakharov in 1975, also were not allowed to attend the ceremony, but were represented by others.


Read more at the Washington Examiner: http://washingtonexaminer.com/blogs...-winner-statement-about-himself#ixzz17kDJEcEh
 

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I thought that after the 'shellacing' he recieved last month that the ego had landed...apparently not.
 

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Another example of how you guys try to tweak everything to your liking. He also talked about other Nobel recipients. Why wouldn't you just post the entire text and be done with it? Wait, I think i already answered that.


"One year ago, I was humbled to receive the Nobel Peace Prize – an award that speaks to our highest aspirations, and that has been claimed by giants of history and courageous advocates who have sacrificed for freedom and justice. Mr. Liu Xiaobo is far more deserving of this award than I was.

All of us have a responsibility to build a just peace that recognizes the inherent rights and dignity of human beings – a truth upheld within the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In our own lives, our own countries, and in the world, the pursuit of a just peace remains incomplete, even as we strive for progress. This past year saw the release of Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, even as the Burmese people continue to be denied the democracy that they deserve. Nobel Laureate Jose Ramos Horta has continued his tireless work to build a free and prosperous East Timor, having made the transition from dissident to President. And this past year saw the retirement of Nobel Laureate Desmond Tutu, whose own career demonstrates the universal power of freedom and justice to overcome extraordinary obstacles.

The rights of human beings are universal – they do not belong to one nation, region or faith. America respects the unique culture and traditions of different countries. We respect China’s extraordinary accomplishment in lifting millions out of poverty, and believe that human rights include the dignity that comes with freedom from want. But Mr. Liu reminds us that human dignity also depends upon the advance of democracy, open society, and the rule of law. The values he espouses are universal, his struggle is peaceful, and he should be released as soon as possible. I regret that Mr. Liu and his wife were denied the opportunity to attend the ceremony that Michelle and I attended last year. Today, on what is also International Human Rights Day, we should redouble our efforts to advance universal values for all human beings."
 

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Because it needs to be explained to those that will simply accept his words at face value... rather then the taking the time to understand the message and meaning he actually is espousing... and why. This is how more then half of this country fell for his words without understanding what "fundamental change", actually meant. Now, there still exists approximately 30% of this country... that still does the very same thing... and becomes highly offended at any questioning of his words... expecting all to take them at face value.
 

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Another example of how you guys try to tweak everything to your liking. He also talked about other Nobel recipients. Why wouldn't you just post the entire text and be done with it?
What did I not post? The first line of his speech in the article, says "Mr. Liu Xiaobo is far more deserving of this award than I was." and I do agree with him, Mr. Liu Xiaobo is not a war criminal... :lookinup:
 

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So how many times did Obama use the word "I" in his speech honoring some one else??? :smack
 
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