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I have a standard 1990 L98, is there any advantage going with a slotted or drill replacement rotor instead of a regular OEM replacement? I do not plan to race, just highway driving. I have heard the drilled rotors have a tendency to crack from hole to hole. I have not heard anything about the slotted. I have seen slotted and drilled on the same rotor. Let me know your experience. Thanks.
 

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I do not think that you would have a problem with normal driving.

I but the Baer+1's on my C6, mostly for looks and for track days. I then have heard that the heavy track braking can cause them to crack. So far so good. The Baer rotors are "galvanized" so you don't have rusty rotors peeking out behind your wheels.

I am turning my C4 into a track car and for $50 bucks you can just get replacement rotors. If I was to upgrade I would just go for a slotted and perhaps thicker rotor so as to handle more heat.

Good luck.
 

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Besides the slight improved stop, the main reason is to get that heat off the rotor. You'll notice a drop in brake pad life though.

I went with a simple cross-drilled rotor that was zinc coated. They look great, especially with the lack of rust.
 

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I have a standard 1990 L98, is there any advantage going with a slotted or drill replacement rotor instead of a regular OEM replacement? I do not plan to race, just highway driving. I have heard the drilled rotors have a tendency to crack from hole to hole. I have not heard anything about the slotted. I have seen slotted and drilled on the same rotor. Let me know your experience. Thanks.
The cross drilled rotors will crack if they are subjected to high heat. If you don't plan to track the car, then you should be fine with stock replacements, slotted, cross drilled, or slotted/cross drilled.

Steven
 

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I tried drilled rotors some time ago and they all cracked with normal street use. Drilled and slotted are more for looks, if you like the look go ahead and use them. If you don't care, save some cost and use a decent standard rotor.
 

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I have a standard 1990 L98, is there any advantage going with a slotted or drill replacement rotor instead of a regular OEM replacement? I do not plan to race, just highway driving. I have heard the drilled rotors have a tendency to crack from hole to hole. I have not heard anything about the slotted. I have seen slotted and drilled on the same rotor. Let me know your experience. Thanks.
For your mentioned usage(street driving) and even light track use if you wanted......you can get (one or the other) or BOTH drilled "and" slotted rotors if you want, for the cool looks.... I've had them on several (street) cars with good results and have them on my Vette currently.....drilled rotors do have a greater tendency to crack, this is "especially" the case if the champfer around the holes isn't right......and if they're cheapie rotors(like the Ebay type's)....but for street type usage , "most" guys have pretty good luck with them(even the cheapie ones).........slotts on the other hand,(if done correctly) don't have the high tendency to crack and can actually work in some situations(on the track especially)....the slots , in certain situations and weather conditions "can" keep a nice clean surface on the pads..............Cross Drilled rotors were actually brought about in a time (many years ago) when brake pad material was MUCH different than it is now a days.... the materials in the pads use to release excessive gasses that would build up between the pad and the rotor surface causing excessive fade(this was called "outgassing")...to try an aleviate this, they drilled holes to get the gasses to escape more efficiently(nothing really at all to do with cooling, like some of the internet sites talk about as an "advantage" to drilled rotors...they're actually "worse" heat wise)......the other big reason some racers and race teams have drilled rotors, more than anything else, was to save weight from a reciprocating item, which we all know, if you can shave weight from an item that spins, it can help much more than just removing weight from a stationary item.......about 90% of ALL the race teams out they're today run solid face rotors since most feel the disadvantages outweigh the advantages to running them......this site has some more good info also.......http://www.wilwood.com/Centers/Information/question_answer/07.asp ...Joe:thumbsup:
 

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I really like the idea of less weight but it's to bad it comes at a loss of surface area. The more holes and slots, the less area for the pad to slow the car down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey Guys'
Thanks for the response I received from my question. From the information I received I am going to go with stock rotors and pads. The drilled and slotted may look nice but for the little it adds to looks is not worth the extra price and possible safety issues..Thanks:thumbsup:
 

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I have slotted and drilled rotors on my car right now and have had no issues with them whatsoever. :thumbsup:
 

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slotted or stock

Actually the holes or slots were never intended to cool the brakes as mosy people think but to relieve the gas that is trapped between the brake pads and the rotors.When the gas gets between the pads and the rotors the brakes feels spungy with hard breaking.Some pads are now slotted to relieve the gas.If you remove metal by grinding then you have less metal to take away the heat.Between the front surface and the reaar surface most rotors have fins.This takes away the heat.If you want to help with brake heat sand blast your fins from time to time to remove the rust.1/8 inch of rust = 4 1/2inch of insulation properties.
 
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