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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello All,

i have read a lot of posts here on check engine light on and flashing for the p0300 code. shameful to say I've got it now, upset as I bought a 50th anniversary convertible for my wife ( she loves the color etc.) I've owned this car for a Week i purchased from a dealer in butler PA a 4 hr ride each way from me. Drove it last Saturday and all was fine 40 min road trip back to my home town. then leaving it started rough then the check engine light flashed. got her home and put on scanner that's how i got code. a bit upsetting as this is recent purchase.
Reading into this i checked the wire harness on driver side where it bends around the fuel rail. sure enough moving the harness left or right will change errors, it went from the multiple misfire to cylinder #6 then back to multiple.
is like to remove the wire harness loom and inspect the wires to see if there is chafing that went through the insulator on them. i purchased plugs and wires as well as this car is new to me and I don't know it yet , has 37,000 miles on it. is there any other place or thing I should look for?

This is my second corvette, my 1993 40th was a great car minus the fixing of ac , water pump, Opti spark, ignition. i do almost all my own work

Any suggestions would be appreciated. thank you Paul
 

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before you start messing with things, contact the dealer. what ever issue it has now was there when you bought it, and it just escaped notice when the dealer inspected it before sale. You do not want to change anything away from the as purchased condition. I am confident a dealer selling such merchandise will stand behind what was represented when he took your money.

It might be as simple as someone didn't snap the ignition wires back on correctly after the presale inspection. In any event you certainly didn't expect trouble in the first week after you bought the car, and the dealer knows this. He probably didn't expect trouble either, just a happy customer. I expect a low milage car such as yours sold for good money, and this dealer is reputable , not a pay by the week on site , we finance anybody place, where you might take your chances with the merchandise, but it still sold as represented.

I also have an 03 convertible , just not a super dolled up one like yours. One of the things you will learn is that you don't need a scan tool , as there is a fault display in the drivers information center in the dash that covers most stuff.

Big congratulations on the new ride. My car is triple black convertible, which I am trying to steward well enough so that it will escape the crusher when I am gone and old car decision day rolls around. I really think the platform worth supporting, for multiple reasons. One of the minor things the car has is the most interior space of any corvette , which makes for a nice comfortable touring car, for a corvette.

it attracts a nice kind of notice, with guys sometimes jokingly hanging out of their ride asking if I want to trade, occasionally less informed people think it is a new car. Although, to be honest, this comment has never happened in the daylight, as my car had multiple owners, a weird noise, and milage just on the ledge of undesirable, but it was below market.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thank you body Surfin child.
i did not know there was a onboard diagnostic! that's great. i am still learning the car and looking at some serviceable things as i am not familiar with this as i was my 93. coolant, oil - im sure was changed but with what? tires are new on it. im calling today to let the dealer know what has happened.

strange for sure, the 4 hour ride back home was smooth a few short trips at home no problem, drove it back to my home town and it was fine going there then on was home it happened. i never experienced this before. ill keep you posted on what happens
 

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thank you body Surfin child.
i did not know there was a onboard diagnostic! that's great.
Your need to check the link I posted. It tells how to check for codes and an explanation of them as well as some tricks and "secrets" about the C5
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Your need to check the link I posted. It tells how to check for codes and an explanation of them as well as some tricks and "secrets" about the C5
Thank you looking for it now.

one thing i havent shared

the car began its life in Texas titled at 6 miles, this owner kept the car for two years. the second owner kept it for 17 and put about 800 miles a year on it so says car fax so im assuming the car sat in a garage for some time this was in Maryland. now its in my garage sitting because its upset with something?

im going to read your thread and go from there ive red techron fuel cleaner and pulling fuses in the engine fuse box and turning key to on position then off repalce fuses . something resetting fuel?

ill read more before proceeding
 

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I really thought contacting the dealer before doing anything to alter the as sold condition was the best way, but to each his own. There is legal principal called expectation of value, something like that , that is a general legal protection against fraud in the market place, that a consumer has a reasonable expectation to get what they paid for. I am sure you didn't bargain for a repair project within the first miles of ownership, and the dealer didn't represent the car as a basket of trouble . Of course, this advice doesn't apply to private party car sales, who reasonably have no repair facilities . However, if you start messing with the car, one can't reasonably expect the dealer to stand behind your work.

Good luck with the repair work , I hope it is a simple fix. the fact that moving the ignition wires effected the engine would seem to indicate the problem is not fuel related. Typically Techron is used when the fuel level indicators act up, since all top tier fuel has that type of additive. besides battery performance and grounds sensitivity, the car is also very sensitive to leaks in the air intake, so checking all the connections might be wise. It is all computer controlled, so has very different requirements from your older set up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I really thought contacting the dealer before doing anything to alter the as sold condition was the best way, but to each his own. There is legal principal called expectation of value, something like that , that is a general legal protection against fraud in the market place, that a consumer has a reasonable expectation to get what they paid for. I am sure you didn't bargain for a repair project within the first miles of ownership, and the dealer didn't represent the car as a basket of trouble . Of course, this advice doesn't apply to private party car sales, who reasonably have no repair facilities . However, if you start messing with the car, one can't reasonably expect the dealer to stand behind your work.

Good luck with the repair work , I hope it is a simple fix. the fact that moving the ignition wires effected the engine would seem to indicate the problem is not fuel related. Typically Techron is used when the fuel level indicators act up, since all top tier fuel has that type of additive. besides battery performance and grounds sensitivity, the car is also very sensitive to leaks in the air intake, so checking all the connections might be wise. It is all computer controlled, so has very different requirements from your older set up.
thank you

im taking advice and called dealer, they or person at reception said someone will contact me back. im guessing sales manager or my sales person. i did not prepare for a project ( my 93 was a big one) i wanted a turn key drive experience, with some service concerns i could address myself and or dealer assistance. hopefully they will offer assistance on this.


i appreciate your help with this and the info its nice as I'm new here and most places come down on new people.
 

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glad you are making progress, it should work out fine.

the old days of "there is an ass for every seat" the " turn 'em and burn 'em" used car sales approach has long been recognized as supremely unproductive. most business plans recognize the cost of acquiring a new customer, (advertising, promotions etc.), is much higher than retaining a customer. Plus they all know bad news travels like wildfire.

As a matter of fact, when a productive car salesperson retires, it is common practice to sell the customer contact file cards every good salesperson keeps to another salesperson for good money, since it has proven good leads. If you have ever seen the movie "Glengary Glenross" you know what I mean about the leads.

Going back to the old high pressure sales days, a car salesman related to me his entertaining experiences selling on a Pontiac lot, where at the end of the month, the guy with the lowest sales number got fired. didn't matter if you had worked productively there for years, that was the deal. So it became the practice, that at the end of every month, the salesmen would all go across the street to the bar they frequented and get drunk with the fired guy.

The crazier part of the story was that this dealership had one of those swooping '60's architectural features, a big plaster awning that looped out over the entrance. It was not unusual for a salesman to talk someone into handing over their car keys before a test drive, for security, which would then be thrown up on top of the awning when the customer wasn't looking .

if the customer tried to leave, the keys just couldn't be found, so why not give us a little more time to work out a deal while we look for your keys. Must have been a nightmare job, I think the guy mentioned that some day drinking across the street was common.

But car lots can be a place where an uneducated guy can earn six figures, at least back then. But it depends on the lot.

I was talking to a private investigator who used to have a used car lot, and was transitioning into financing, where, as he said, the real money is. Private detective was just a job he enjoyed, because he could often help people.

He told me a door whore, the guy who is always the first to greet a customer when they first step on the lot, sometimes at the car door, could make six figures easily down at Cal Worthington, a guy who advertised heavily during the late night movies on TV. He also cautioned, " just don't sell the car in the ad, or you can just hop in the back seat and ride home with the customer."

Cal is long gone, but he still has his name over a very big used car lot down in Long Beach, a suburb of Los Angeles. He got run out of town for a while for shady business practices, and low and behold, I saw him up on Alaskan TV doing the same stuff, he was standing up tied to the wing of a biplane , saying I'll do anything to make a deal, same as always, where one commercial had him riding a tiger in the lot. I guess you can't keep an almost good man down.

I think the cowboy hat and western persona he always used helped his image, he ran the other used car guy, who also used to run late night TV ads and pitched in a low key sincere way, always with his dog, I mean who doesn't trust a dog owner.

Cowboy cal ran him right off of TV, but with various non dogs featured in his ads, I also remember him riding a small hippo down a row of cars.

When I read your reply about "some service concerns I would address myself", I had to smile. I had the same idea when I bought my sled. problem is, I wildly overestimated my desire to work on cars in my old age. I might do a small repair, if the work is clean and easy, but mostly I just change the oil and wash the thing. Have to admit, I am well set up for oil changes, and use a local coin operated wash stall that recycles water, because water supply is tight here I live in SoCal.

I am pretty confident your car issue will be straightened out and you will be cruising in time for a merry Christmas. If the car had real problems, they would have caught it in inspection before it hit the lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
glad you are making progress, it should work out fine.

the old days of "there is an ass for every seat" the " turn 'em and burn 'em" used car sales approach has long been recognized as supremely unproductive. most business plans recognize the cost of acquiring a new customer, (advertising, promotions etc.), is much higher than retaining a customer. Plus they all know bad news travels like wildfire.

As a matter of fact, when a productive car salesperson retires, it is common practice to sell the customer contact file cards every good salesperson keeps to another salesperson for good money, since it has proven good leads. If you have ever seen the movie "Glengary Glenross" you know what I mean about the leads.

Going back to the old high pressure sales days, a car salesman related to me his entertaining experiences selling on a Pontiac lot, where at the end of the month, the guy with the lowest sales number got fired. didn't matter if you had worked productively there for years, that was the deal. So it became the practice, that at the end of every month, the salesmen would all go across the street to the bar they frequented and get drunk with the fired guy.

The crazier part of the story was that this dealership had one of those swooping '60's architectural features, a big plaster awning that looped out over the entrance. It was not unusual for a salesman to talk someone into handing over their car keys before a test drive, for security, which would then be thrown up on top of the awning when the customer wasn't looking .

if the customer tried to leave, the keys just couldn't be found, so why not give us a little more time to work out a deal while we look for your keys. Must have been a nightmare job, I think the guy mentioned that some day drinking across the street was common.

But car lots can be a place where an uneducated guy can earn six figures, at least back then. But it depends on the lot.

I was talking to a private investigator who used to have a used car lot, and was transitioning into financing, where, as he said, the real money is. Private detective was just a job he enjoyed, because he could often help people.

He told me a door whore, the guy who is always the first to greet a customer when they first step on the lot, sometimes at the car door, could make six figures easily down at Cal Worthington, a guy who advertised heavily during the late night movies on TV. He also cautioned, " just don't sell the car in the ad, or you can just hop in the back seat and ride home with the customer."

Cal is long gone, but he still has his name over a very big used car lot down in Long Beach, a suburb of Los Angeles. He got run out of town for a while for shady business practices, and low and behold, I saw him up on Alaskan TV doing the same stuff, he was standing up tied to the wing of a biplane , saying I'll do anything to make a deal, same as always, where one commercial had him riding a tiger in the lot. I guess you can't keep an almost good man down.

I think the cowboy hat and western persona he always used helped his image, he ran the other used car guy, who also used to run late night TV ads and pitched in a low key sincere way, always with his dog, I mean who doesn't trust a dog owner.

Cowboy cal ran him right off of TV, but with various non dogs featured in his ads, I also remember him riding a small hippo down a row of cars.

When I read your reply about "some service concerns I would address myself", I had to smile. I had the same idea when I bought my sled. problem is, I wildly overestimated my desire to work on cars in my old age. I might do a small repair, if the work is clean and easy, but mostly I just change the oil and wash the thing. Have to admit, I am well set up for oil changes, and use a local coin operated wash stall that recycles water, because water supply is tight here I live in SoCal.

I am pretty confident your car issue will be straightened out and you will be cruising in time for a merry Christmas. If the car had real problems, they would have caught it in inspection before it hit the lot.
you are the best,

i too ( just turned 50) am in same mind set ill do some maintenance items at home but really don't build cars anymore or do major overhaul work. brake jobs oil, filters real basic is what i like to do anymore. i help out my neighbors kids on a few things from time to time and my own, I've got a large tool box and most ask me " are you a technician? nope I'm am network engineer. the faces are great to see after i tell them this.
the good news, dealer reached out to me and asked if i can take the car to get diagnosed, i agreed and am making an appointment after Christmas at Whit Moyer Chevrolet - trusted dealer for the corvette community here in Lancaster county Pennsylvania. and was told to keep them in loop of findings with the car. i feel relieved on this. the owner is real nice and seems genuinely concerned on what is happening, i spoke with him for some time when i was out in Butler pa picking the car up ( this is north of Pittsburg pa)

in short time driving the C5 i can say its a lot better driving than the C4 was more room too, seating position is better as well, controls, vision, and mainly that Kimberly feels more secure in it and confident to actually drive the car on nice days, maybe even put the top down? will see?

ill keep you all in the loop as well on findings with the car. hoping this is simple
 

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the appreciation was much appreciated. I realize the stories make the posts too long for some to retain interest, but I like them, and my varied experiences help contribute to wisdom , so I pass them on.

From the description of the merch, I was confident you were with a high quality dealer and would have few problems. I was a little careless in predicting the car would be sorted out before Christmas , I forgot the realities of the holiday season. As you probably know, people with the skills to hold down a coveted dealership corvette mechanics job, don't get asked to work holidays, and the best select their work environment as they choose.

As a seventy year old guy who had no experience owning a corvette , but was aware of the corvette= old guy social baggage, I didn't mind that my used car selection was all black, set off by the earlier wagon wheel rims in chrome, the big chrome giving it a kind of Mexican silver concha effect against the black.

But now that I have gotten used to the car, and put on the prettier correct wheels , I find black a little dull, and remember the fun of a red sports car from my youth. however, it's not a crisis, I still like the looks, but also realize the low visibility of a dark color has some slight safety disadvantages in a world full of nuts loosely securing the steering wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
so i followed the threads instruction and used the cars onboard diagnostic. i cleared a few codes it had stored. i cant start the car until tonight as im waiting for another set of plug wires.
the ones on it were bonded to the spark plug, im guessing OEM equipment. almost all broke as i muscled them off, new plugs installed now waiting on new MSD wires, the edelbrock ones looked like the factory so that's why I'm waiting - im not sure just yet even though everyone's reviews said these things were made by the good lord himself
 

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The more you go the deeper it gets. At least disc brakes are easy once you get it off the ground. Brake the bleeder open before you compress the caliper piston in. Was told by a mechanic friend that you don’t want to push fluid back through your abs pump. Oh sorry didn’t see that the dealership had it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The more you go the deeper it gets. At least disc brakes are easy once you get it off the ground. Brake the bleeder open before you compress the caliper piston in. Was told by a mechanic friend that you don’t want to push fluid back through your abs pump.
i completely wimped out and told dealer to do it, 599.00 for pads rotors and 170 to bleed the system. the dealership i bought the car said they would chip in to help out, will see what they say.
Whitmoyer Chevrolet is great, usually I'm not a dealer fan usually but my experience has been great so far and honest.

trans service ill do next in spring, probably coolant flush as well. - i don't know how old these are but assume its all factory original that's pretty old.
 

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Had my trany done by a vette shop locally he also did my super damper. Some things are just easer if you have a lift. I will probably flush my brake fluid this winter and change over to high temp. I kinda like to take corners faster than I should. So I’m on the brakes hard at times.
 

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I can rationalize about almost anything for convenience sake, although I am not entirely sure I want that publicly known. I guess it depends on priorities, I was raised with both a pioneer work ethic, and to be honest.

Whenever I start to choke on a high price for something that I could do myself, I always take comfort, rationalizing that if something goes wrong with the work, It's not my job, I have a fall guy, a professional to take the responsibility for any problem, and make it right on his dime. And that is without even considering how many hungry lawyers are out there, if things go very badly on the road after repairs. if you do it yourself, you don't have enough paperwork , and courts love documentation.

The last thing I want to do is trigger a cascade of other repairs because I undertook what should have been a simple task and the unexpected happened, or something had materially changed that I didn't anticipate since I last did the work.

Besides, money comes and goes, and what you are really paying for is a quality of life, while also supporting the adjacent quality of life in your community. this is not to imply I am cavalier about my weak little car budget, just learned the hard way not to cry about the inevitable old car learning curve.

But that is not why I am here, I really got off track with the self depreciating I hired the dealer stuff.

Why I am here is that it struck me that I had a heck of a time adjusting to the overhang on the front of the car, so wanted to caution you about that. Hopefully it was just me, but I ran into a lot of concrete parking barriers when parking head on when I first got the car, and the radiator supports under my car still tell the tale. Matter of fact, I have some plastic slipcovers called ," fangs" that are designed just to mitigate such events, but I got them for a cosmetic cover-up, hopefully I have learned my lesson in the past miles I have owned the car. I am just hoping the steel isn't so mangled that they don't fit. haven't quite wanted to explore that just yet, fearing disappointment.

I used the GM red wires when I did the plugs on my car, as I bought from a private party and kind of wanted to establish a starting timeline on consumable repairs, and that stuff was simple . I had read there was nothing better than the red GM stuff. my old plugs were fine, heck they were the iridium stuff rated for !00,000 miles , but I changed them anyway. I did benefit slightly from a change in the gap specification when GM switched to iridium plugs, The new narrower gap smoothed my idle just a bit, only noticeable by ear, nothing changed on the display gauges.

Since you mentioned Edelbrock, they have the main offices nearby and used to throw a yearly employees car show, open to the all , complete with live stage and sound truck music. The last time I went, they imported an Elvis impersonator from Vegas to front a rock a billy band , it was a pretty big event, lots of special cars. One touring exhibition bucket T drag car just sat there and loudly threw big long flames up into the air, as it was designed to do nothing else. As I left, Edelbrock Jr was at the gate, smiling at the exit crowd, just a couple of years before he died, seemingly well satisfied at the yearly community event he had just put on.

But what I thought might be of more general interest is they also displayed a small collection of personally owned cars, plus one small old hydroplane race boat, kept as a historical exhibit of cool cars they used in the past. . The family display showed the unrestored primitive dirt track model A open ford, no roll bar, no fenders, that advertised edelbrocks speed shop on both sides, and kick started the business when it kept winning at the local dirt tracks. a sign alongside the car explained the history, and the fact that the lever on top of the exposed drive tunnel was actually a gear lever he could pull during the race, an illegal overdrive allowing him a speed advantage over the field when needed.

In the sixties, there was a local legend about one of his good looking blond daughters, who ran around town in a pretty blue 427 cobra roadster. It's kind of in poor taste to repeat it , but she is a grown woman now and probably wouldn't care about such old gossip, which probably was just a jealous male response to the figure she cut around town at the time, and probably wasn't true anyway. The rumor was that if you could catch her, you could kiss her. I only saw her and the car once, briefly, and mostly from behind. my little teenaged self in a struggling 1962 MG "A" English first car roadster couldn't even dream about seeing if the stories were true. with that car, a speed modification was to pull all four plugs and wire brush the carbon build up off of them. Repeat as needed, like shampoo.

Almost forgot, I also wanted to warn you about the glove compartment latch. if the inside loop ever works loose, it gets pushed forward, into a position where the door will securely latch as usual, but is now in a position where it won't unlatch, at all. I have read an upsetting few online cries for help about this , with seemingly no solution other than tearing into the glove box from behind, after you have removed the dash.

I think all the rest of the design eccentricities are easily found in well organized internet posts, where one doesn't have to slog through a bunch of endless yammering stories just to get to the point.
 
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