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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought some red dupicolor caliper paint to match the color of my car and then I heard that I should powder coat them for a better finish and last longer. What are your thoughts?
 

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I bought some red dupicolor caliper paint to match the color of my car and then I heard that I should powder coat them for a better finish and last longer. What are your thoughts?

Used silver POR15 on mine ... resistant to DOT3/4 fluids.
Red is not an option with POR.

Taking off to paint ? Perfect time to rebuild 'em, too.
Good Luck
:buhbye:
 

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If it didn't mean taking them off the car and going through all the nause associated with it (ie, if they were in a box waiting to be fitted) then I'd definitely powder coat mine.

I haven't used POR but I know that powder coat sets like stone...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They are basically all brand new 15,000 miles ago from Stainless Steel Brakes as the previous owner installed the complete setup. I got new 18" wheels the other day and now would like my calipers to match the paint on car.

If I have them powder coated...Please tell me WHERE I DONT WANT the powdercoating. Sorry for the stupid question...but can I just unbolt them from the 2 bolts on the bracket and take them assembled (minus brake line) to the powder coating place or do I need to fully disassemble them?
 

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If I was powder coating mine, then I'd be doing it myself but you'll have to strip them and remove anything that'll melt! Then you'll have to mask up areas you don't want to powder coat - inside the piston bores, the mating surfaces where they bolt together, bolt holes, brake line hole etc. You'll have to get the powder coating shop to do it for you, unless you have silicone bungs and hi temp masking tape.

They'll also have to be spotlessly clean before you coat them...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
okay...painting them it is as I am not going through all that mess to get them powder coated. Too bad they they don't need rebuilding as then it would be so much easier.
 

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I think the powder coat finish would be worth the effort if you're pulling them from the car anyway, but it's totally up to you :thumbsup:
 

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Powder coating requires baking at 350* for 20 minutes. They would need to be completely disassembled and rebuilt. If they should attain 350* during use, I believe they would get soft again. I would use paint specifically designed for calipers. Eastwood has it, probably others.
 

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Bloody good point Jeff, I never thought of that :crazy:

Do you reckon they'd get that hot during use?
 

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Just out of curiosity, I'd be interesting to know...
 

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I used that same paint kit. It has held up fine for the last 18 months with no problems. Still has a great shine to it. Much easier than powder coating
 

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I don't think 350* would be an issue on the street. On a race car? Probably- anyone ever seen a video of a race where the rotors are glowing? Bet they get over 350* then. I saw a video not too long ago of the C6-R team- rotors were glowing, at 178 MPH down the back straight the left front rotor exploded- lost all the brakes, not counting the $10k for the rotor.

:lookinup:
 

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I used high heat engine paint on my calipers, and it is holding up well. I have the typical stain from a little brake fluid dribble during bleeding, but otherwise I'm happy with it.
 

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Powder coating is a thermoset, it uses heat to cure (harden). Once it has cured, further heating cycles wil not soften powder coating.
 

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Powder coating is a thermoset, it uses heat to cure (harden). Once it has cured, further heating cycles wil not soften powder coating.
:agree: and once it's cured it is on there. You couldn't chisel that stuff off. The company my wife works for does power coating. I had them do a pulley for the supercharger on the Mustang I had. Well the bore of the pulley didn't get masked.....It took me quite a bit of sanding and effort to remove the coating. I would have expected it to be masked, but can't complain too much when it's done for free.

If it were me, I'd recommend power coating over painting. Even though it would be a bit more work.
 

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:agree: and once it's cured it is on there. You couldn't chisel that stuff off...
I did my inlet manifold and when I bolted it back on the block, some of the powder coat chipped off right around the bolt heads. I don't know whether that's because I didn't bake it properly or whether the powder coat just doesn't like that sort of torque applied to it, all in one area :huh:
 
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