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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My 1978 manual states 20-25 in-lbs for new pinion bearings, but other sources state 14-19 and 15-17. Which is correct? It is intended to be a moderate performance street daily driver. Also, my current out of the car differential 10 bolt clockwise (from the front) is 16-19 in-lbs, but counterclockwise is 22-24 in-lbs as measured with a new dial 6-30 in-lb torque wrench. I am using a shimmed solid spacer. Can I use it as is? All comments and suggestions are welcome.
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Walmartone
 

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looks like no one saw this, I was off here a week or so.

I never setup new pinion bearing over 20. I set mine to 17-20 add another 8-10 when in you install the case for total.

You should not have the variance in readings like you have could be a bad bearing or solid sleeve setup, Solid sleeves have to be machine fit using the shims that come in the kits will not get you close. 001= 4-5 in/lb drag. Doing this on a lathe can be done but a surface grinder is the way to do them.
 

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I just saw this and also responded on another forum.

If you are building a 78 vette diff the pinion only preload is 17-20 in/lb. You could go low to 15 but I keep it at 17-20. With the case installed you have to add the case bearing preload so add another 8-10 to the pinion total. ie, if the pinion is 17 then you want the total 25-27 in/lb.

There should be no change in drag cw or ccw. I suspect your new bearing is damaged.

You can bolt it together like that is you like but it's not right. If I was doing that build I would start with fresh pinion bearings and get them to a smooth 17-20 in both directions.

Solid spacers have to be machine fit, the shims in the kit are not going to get you close at all. Surface grinder is the preferred method since we are talking about a few tenths to get it correct.

imessage online
 
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