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Discussion Starter #1
Here is my problem with my 2005, manual C6

Get in at the end of the day and push the button to start, no go. I get a "service column lock" message in the DIC.

I have towed the the car to the local stealership not less than 7 times. Sometimes I can walk away for a few minutes and then the car will start. The stealership originally said it was a bad battery. That does not make sense because the car will start in the morning after sitting for a week or more but won't start in the afternoon. The stealership has replaced the battery.

I've spoken to the tech at the stealership and he mentioned that the 2005 with the manual transmission only used this system for the column lock. In 2006 they changed the system to something else. Lucky me.

They at one point in time found a short in the column lock motor. They have replaced that but I am still stuck with a car that won't start.

It seems that when the car is left out and the sun bakes it during the day causes some kind of electrical glitch that prevents the car from starting.

Yesterday I picked the car up and drove home. Came to work today and the car started first thing this morning. Came out for lunch and nothing. I sad there for a minute cussing and then I heard something click/clunk and then the car started. So I have returned the car to the stealership for further analysis.

Any ideas? Anyone?
 

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If it were me, I would upgrade a couple of the components and drop the SCLM forever.

I installed it in my vette to make it Euro compliant, boy did I backtrack ultra fast on that one.

Regards,

Fluffy
 

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I saw parts of your thread about this.

What do I need to upgrade?
You're first going to need to find a GM Techie that knows his stuff.

The GM Dealers I have dealt with didn't know what to do and I had to expirement for myself.

The component that controls the SCLM and prevents the car from starting is ... the RCDLR ... of all things ... :huh:

You need to find someone who is able to install a 2006 RCDLR without configuring it as a 2005 RCDLR. This may mean borrowing the VIN from a 2006 Corvette that does not have the SCLM installed.

It may be necessary to install a 2006 BCM but from my experience the killer is the RCDLR. It's the component that interacts the most with the SCLM. A new BCM costs 200$ - I just replaced mine last week.

For your vette there will be a couple of things to do, but you first need someone who is willing and able to install a newer RCDLR into the car.

I believe that this is starting point to resolving your issues that will be the most difficult. I'm leaving the country in two weeks so I can't physically help you.

I would install the new RCDLR myself and purchase it on the internet as your local GM Dealer will charge an arm and a leg to change it. You are probably out of warranty be now I assume.

You will also have to remove the existing SCLM from the steering wheel.

The alternative, potential cheaper and easier, that I would suggest trying is moving the SCLM to the BCM foot well (this is where I initially installed the SCLM) with it's solenoid.
If the solenoid is not exposed to the stress of the steering wheel, it should probably last longer then it has to this day.

I would do this myself and not have GM Dealer charge an arm a leg for that.

Just order from an online site a new solenoid and try installing it yourself. You do not need the Tech2 to replace the solenoid, reprogramming is required for a change in the SCLM only.

Be careful with the wires from the SCLM to the solenoid, they are extremely fragile.

You can start out simply by buying a new solenoid and connecting it the SCLM. If this works, I would move both components to the BCM foot well - or find a place for the SCLM solenoid somewhere in the dashboard.


For some reason, the solenoid is the most expensive part, around 300$ ...

Everything I say is in the Helm service manual, I would start by getting the Helms manual for your car.

I can look up in the manual tonight for more details on how proceed in the removal process.

HTH,

Fluffy
 

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sorry for the long post.

As a first step, I would get a new solenoid with the correct part number - it is my understanding that an improved version was produced.

I would try this new solenoid to see if it works.

If this works, I would look into installing the solenoid without physically locking the steering wheel. Thereby reducing the stress on the solenoid.

Also I have noticed that due to the distance between the battery and the solenoid, the voltage drop is quite important. I would investigate bringing a cable straight from the battery to improve the performance of the solenoid. (One of the reasons for which I put my SCLM by the BCM in the passenger foot well).

If this fails, I would go down the removal route of the SCLM.

Regards,

Cedric
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks so much!!!

the tech was commenting on having different voltage readings across the SLCM that did not make sense and no body at GM could advise what the correct readings were supposed to be.
He did not have access to another 2005 with a manual to compare values.
 

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Thanks so much!!!

the tech was commenting on having different voltage readings across the SLCM that did not make sense and no body at GM could advise what the correct readings were supposed to be.
He did not have access to another 2005 with a manual to compare values.
The solenoid has four cables going to it. One ground, one lock, one unlock and resistor measure.

The solenoid is in fact a motor and the SCLM just applies tension to one or the other command lines for a preset time.
The SCLM is supposed to get a 12V power supply, my experience is that it doesn't (I read around 10V). So if the solenoid is slightly stuck at the steering wheel, the motor doesn't have the stamina it needs to break free.

When the solenoid is in lock position you get one resistance value, when it is unlocked you get another value.

As such it is technically feasible to build a module that imitates the solenoid and never breaks down. I think the market just isn't big enough for that.

Fluffy.

ps: exact voltage readings are given in the helms manual, your techie should know them.
 
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