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Discussion Starter #1
As I remove things to repair or to restore, I am thinking maybe I should clean up and restore the nuts and bolts.

I'd like to do this to keep the fasteners safe from future rust and to make it easier to remove in the future. This is motly for body bolts for when I am removing bumpers etc.

Does anyone have a procedure they use to clean and possibly paint the nuts and bolts? So far I would say to use a wire wheel to clean off rust, a solvent to remove grease and some paint to keep them protected.

Thanks
 

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that is all i do, i do use a little rust converter on them before i paint them to slow any further developement
 

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Is there any reason you don't replace them? Most any fastener can be bought in stainless if you want the ultimate in rust protection.
 

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cleaning nuts and bolts

here on the other side of the atlantic where everythings gone metric high tensile imperial nuts and bolts are hard to find.what i do is place the nuts and bolts in a drinks bottle add some marine clean (por15) half fill with boiling water replace the top and shake the lot vigoursly.pull the nuts and bolts run a tap or die on the threads back in the bath again should be like new,any stubborn rust can be removed with a rotary wire brush.if you can buy them new good for you












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Contact a local plating shop.
You can have them cadmium plated.

Check with the plater, but I think their process will clean them too.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was hoping there was some kind of clear protectant paint. But it sounds like the best bet is to make sure the bolt is in decent shape, clean it up, de-rust it and maybe use anti-seize on the threads?
 

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I was hoping there was some kind of clear protectant paint. But it sounds like the best bet is to make sure the bolt is in decent shape, clean it up, de-rust it and maybe use anti-seize on the threads?

That is pretty much it. All the bolts I reuse I just sandblast them in my small cabinet and clean up the threads. After that you could paint them, but most of my attempts at painting just have the paint come off the minute you put a wrench on them an start tightening. Now I just clean them up with degreaser, sandblast if needed, and put them back to use with antisieze, threadlocker or thread sealer depending on where they go.
 

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I bought a rock tumbler from harbor freight & use black beauty sandblasting sand fill it up with sand & bolts then let it tumble for about 24 hours shake them out clean with laquer thinner blow them off with the compresser prime & paint or powdercoat depending on where they go
 

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Wire brush, acetone as degreaser, then Rustoleum Clear (for wheels, I think I've also used a High Temp Ceramic version too), AFTER assy: avoids messing up the paint w/wrench, and keeps moisture from seeping under the bolt head. Def. NOT NCRS though....but who cares.

Added bonus: The Wet Look! (I like shiny things!!!)
 

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I use the world's most under-powered bench mounted grinder with a wire wheel. The black & decker kind they sell at wal mart for $20. You can stick your hand into the wire wheel and stop it without bleeding.

It is laughable as a grinder but the perfect wire wheel bolt cleaner. Either hold them with a glove or vise-grips.

You wanna be careful getting to agressive blasting or wheeling threads, it rolls the tips which causes a loss of torque-holding.

Stainless bolts are highly over-rated and will often seize to the nut, especially non-stainless body clip nuts. I still grimace when disassembling things from my stainless bolt days. :crazy: Normal hardware with quality antiseize is old fashioned, but works.

good luck
 
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