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just saw the an article and thought the same thing....
 

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the exiting part of all this is , if the information is correct the 6.2l v8 is now going to produce almost the same hp that the 7.0l v8.Probably in the future the same v8 could produce 500 hp in other cars .
 

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the exiting part of all this is , if the information is correct the 6.2l v8 is now going to produce almost the same hp that the 7.0l v8.Probably in the future the same v8 could produce 500 hp in other cars .
From my understanding this was pure speculation, however the line-up would make sense for the ATS. I think its certain that the ATS will have a I-4 engine standard and likely the turbocharged one. V-6 as a optional engine although it was speculated that there could be two V-6 engine options and a Gen V SBC for the V series.

What makes the most sense to me is seeing as how the ATV V will go head to head with the BMW M3 that it needs to have some of the characteristics. I think that a 5.0L Gen V V-8 that makes 450BHP and revs as high as 7,500rpms would do the best. Consider that the next generation M3 is said to be going back to a 6 cylinder engine but with turbocharging. Also ATS V has to have a manual transmission and if they want to some kind of computer controlled manual as a option. For a mid level engine in the ATS the up coming 3.0L turbo makes the most sense especially someone who buys this model for really cheap can get 400+BHP from it. The 2.0L turbo makes sense for the base model, though for over seas markets I would expect it to have a lower then that engine like the 1.8L I-4 engine and one maybe two diesel options.
 

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From my understanding this was pure speculation, however the line-up would make sense for the ATS. I think its certain that the ATS will have a I-4 engine standard and likely the turbocharged one. V-6 as a optional engine although it was speculated that there could be two V-6 engine options and a Gen V SBC for the V series.

What makes the most sense to me is seeing as how the ATV V will go head to head with the BMW M3 that it needs to have some of the characteristics. I think that a 5.0L Gen V V-8 that makes 450BHP and revs as high as 7,500rpms would do the best. Consider that the next generation M3 is said to be going back to a 6 cylinder engine but with turbocharging. Also ATS V has to have a manual transmission and if they want to some kind of computer controlled manual as a option. For a mid level engine in the ATS the up coming 3.0L turbo makes the most sense especially someone who buys this model for really cheap can get 400+BHP from it. The 2.0L turbo makes sense for the base model, though for over seas markets I would expect it to have a lower then that engine like the 1.8L I-4 engine and one maybe two diesel options.


Your really think that gm would make a 5 liter v8?
 

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Your really think that gm would make a 5 liter v8?
Most likely not, though currently they do make a 4.8L and 5.3L V-6 engine.

The 5.5L V-8 that we see in the GT2 race car is the 6.2L with a 5.3L crank (or was it 4.8L crank).

To me making a 5.0L engine and using that to replace both the 4.8L and 5.3L would make a ton of sense. As volume for the GMT-900s has been on the decline it could benefit from greater cost sharing. Not only that but with the advancements of the Gen V the 5.0L will make more horsepower and torque then the 5.3L and get better fuel economy then both the 5.3L and 4.8L.

When people here smaller size and Gen V they seem to think that the block is down sizing. From what I have read the block isn't down sizing, and the deck will be taller. So the Gen V block would still be able to achieve 427 and even 454 engine sizes. When they say downsize they mean for regular production items, a Z06 and ZR1 are not regular production items.
 

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Most likely not, though currently they do make a 4.8L and 5.3L V-6 engine.

The 5.5L V-8 that we see in the GT2 race car is the 6.2L with a 5.3L crank (or was it 4.8L crank).

To me making a 5.0L engine and using that to replace both the 4.8L and 5.3L would make a ton of sense. As volume for the GMT-900s has been on the decline it could benefit from greater cost sharing. Not only that but with the advancements of the Gen V the 5.0L will make more horsepower and torque then the 5.3L and get better fuel economy then both the 5.3L and 4.8L.

When people here smaller size and Gen V they seem to think that the block is down sizing. From what I have read the block isn't down sizing, and the deck will be taller. So the Gen V block would still be able to achieve 427 and even 454 engine sizes. When they say downsize they mean for regular production items, a Z06 and ZR1 are not regular production items.
nice info but i wasn't talking about truck engine i was talking about the engine the corvette is going to use. It is obvius that there are going to be smaller engine in the new v8 family .But i don't think gm is going to use or build a 5.5 l v8 ,,, a 5.7 l v8 could be a possibility because of nostalgia .
 

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nice info but i wasn't talking about truck engine i was talking about the engine the corvette is going to use. It is obvius that there are going to be smaller engine in the new v8 family .But i don't think gm is going to use or build a 5.5 l v8 ,,, a 5.7 l v8 could be a possibility because of nostalgia .
Same applies for the car engine as its the same engine family, the engine isn't shrinking but the regular displacements they will use are.

Just like how the LS1 which was 5.7L was able to push out to 7.0L and above that. Though they had to use sleeves in order to bore it out to that point.

The Gen V will be the same way, they may produce a 4.5L (smallest Gen IV motor is 4.8L) or even a 4.0L for production in some cars. It does not mean that the engine can not be pushed out to 7.0L after market or GM won't produce a 7.0L monster. The performance build center is around just for that limited production engines.

Though this is based on info that is out (that the actual block isn't shrinking) and makes a ton of sense. The Gen V won't be a ground up new block but a continued evolution of the Small Block Chevy.
 

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Remember, years ago, GM was talking the c7 will be the generation to go hybrid. Just like the high horsepower imports are working on, i doubt v8 talk is a leading story in powertrain meetings, strick emissions laws coming in the next couple years as well. Even the c7 concept car has hybrid written on the engine. Just my 2 cents. We can refer back to this thread in a couple years.. ;)
 

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Remember, years ago, GM was talking the c7 will be the generation to go hybrid. Just like the high horsepower imports are working on, i doubt v8 talk is a leading story in powertrain meetings, strick emissions laws coming in the next couple years as well. Even the c7 concept car has hybrid written on the engine. Just my 2 cents. We can refer back to this thread in a couple years.. ;)
emission laws are going to get tougher however emissions technology have gotten better at the same time. So this shouldn't be too much of a concern, especially with the Gen V slated to get direct injection and VVT being more common on them then on the Gen IV motors.

A good thing to look at is comparing the FWD 3.6L V6 powered Chevy Malibu (6 speed auto) to the RWD 3.6L v6 powered Chevy Camaro (6 speed auto). the Malibu has a rating of 17/26 while the Camaro has a rating of 18/29. How is it possible for a RWD V6 powered car to get better fuel economy then a FWD v6 powered car?.

Though if you look past that consider that the 3.6L in the Camark makes 312BHP compared to 252BHP in the 3.6L in the Malibu. Camaro V6 has gone from 0-60 in 5.8 seconds before which is faster then what the V6 Malibu has done. C02 ratings for the Camaro (annuel tons based on 15,000 miles a year) is 8.5 and for the Malibu 9.3.

With the 2011 V6 Mustang making 305BHP and getting 19/31 the 2012 Camaro v6 is going to have to make more power and yet get better fuel economy.

My point of this is while the idea of a hybrid Corvette was in the air I don't think its the route they will go. Not with the improvements in engineering and automotive designs. The current 6.2L LS3 power Corvette is rated at 16/26, with a Gen V motor they can beat that power level and at the same time hit 30MPG on the highway. Though the Corvette does not need to get that high considering that its low production it has little impact on GMs CAFE.

Still if they can produce a 3,000 pound Corvette and get 450BHP from a engine while returning 20/30 then the C7 would be hard to beat. Consider what people would be cross shopping this car with, a Porsche Cayman which current cost $50,000 makes 265BHP and is rated at 19/27.

The trick for the Corvette C7 won't be adding tons of horsepower however taking better advantage of that power. Which starts with a reduced curb weight, which removes the idea of a hybrid unless they wanted to make a special mode hybrid Corvette.
 

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Yes, thats true, the v6 stang and camaros run low 14s, due to weight mostly. However, co2 emissions are going to get real strick, hybid technology is getting more advanced by the day. The corvette will no doubt go hybrid someday, as porshe, ferrrari etc are already well into developing there models for near future cross over. So say the c7 has an 8 year run starting in 2 years. That takes us past the year 2020, combine that with the fact GM already talked about a c7 hybid, and its noted on the concept car. Looks like the writting is on the wall.
Who knows, maybe they'll make a twin turbo v6 as well as a hybrid c7. We have an 08 BMW twin turbo 6 cylinder speedwagon, AWD 6 speed manual, but my c5 spanks it. Better get some super v8 emissions technology, or get into hybrids, or be left behind, when the other supercars go fast with hybrids.
 

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Its really hard to impossible to see what future trends will bring, just to say stricter emissions are coming doesn't really say much. When stricter emissions came last the Dodge Viper went from 510BHP to 600BHP in order to meet the new emissions rules.

If you would have asked most people that with stricter emissions the Viper was going to jump nearly 100BHP they would have said that you were crazy. Once more the next Viper is slated to produce near 700BHP from a updated version of the 8.4L V-10 engine and fuel economy will improve as well as emissions will drop.

In 1969 Chevy had a operational gas electric hybrid car that never went into production. The Corvette has seen rotary engines used in I believe two concepts (if not more). As well as the fact that the Corvette has seen rear mid engine layouts as well as rear engine layouts. A V-6 powered Corvette was planned and in case someone has forgotten the Corvette started out with a I6 engine.

The I6 engine was the mainstay engine for Chevy up until the Chevy small block V8 was produced. They have made something like 90 million small block Chevy V8s to date.

Another factor comes down to this, Ferrari as a small automaker they are exempt from CAFE (if I remember). The move to make a hybrid Ferrari is purely about PR in a modern automotive press era where everyone wants to make head lines. For both Porsche and Ferrari making hybrids is something that is being done as a possible route into the future instead of what is needed.

So for future changes we might see in some applications turbocharged I4 engines take the place of V-6 engines (such as the mid sized sedan market). We may even see V-6 engines take the place of some V8 engines in areas where it can make do.

Instead what while we may see fewer V8 engines offered in vehicles the ones we do see will be of the better type.

Then you have the purest who for example do not like the V8 engine in the BMW M3. Who feel that the 135i and more so the 1M is what the BMW M3 should have been.

The reason I am very skeptical about hybrid drivetrains making it into sports cars comes down to this. Sports cars are about the driving dynamic mainly, while the cost of a sports car can easily adjust for the cost of a hybrid system the weight penalty I fear will hurt it too much. So if someone does make a hybrid sports car (a really good one at that) I don't think it will survive on the market where someone makes a really good all engine powered sports car. Simply because of the added weight will hurt the driving dynamic too much.

besides where the 35MPG CAFE rule is driving up fuel economy and cheaply is in the sub compact, compact, and mid sized groups. We are seeing 40+MPG sub compacts and compacts and we are seeing mid sized sedans who are getting the same fuel economy as compacts some 5 years ago. That is without a expensive hybrid system, this is where 35MPG CAFE will be met. The fact that the 42MPG Cruve Eco gets on the CAFE system something like 50+MPG highway should show the actual impact of the 35MPG Cafe to have been blown way out of proportions.
 
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