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Discussion Starter #1
Hello every one, New member, I am enterested in trying club road racing. I do not own a Corvette yet, but I was thinking of a C5. Does anyone know what is needed to race (car prep) and what classes are avalible for the C5. I know this is a broad subject. I have to start somewhere, so letter-rip
 

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Storm King said:
Hello every one, New member, I am enterested in trying club road racing. I do not own a Corvette yet, but I was thinking of a C5. Does anyone know what is needed to race (car prep) and what classes are avalible for the C5. I know this is a broad subject. I have to start somewhere, so letter-rip
Well I have done 1 event this year and there are a ton of classifications that are involved with the SCCA.

This page should help answer your questions

http://www.scca.org/amateur/solo2/classes/
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What about head to head racing. the link look like autocross. do you have a link for other types of racing?
 

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Storm King said:
What about head to head racing. the link look like autocross. do you have a link for other types of racing?
If you want to race a showroom stock class, the C5 runs in the SCCA Touring 1 class. If you want to run a modified car there are a number of classes to choose from.

Whichever class you run in you will need to do the following at a minumum:

1) Gut the interior - In addition to reducing weight you are also removing flammable material. Leave the defroster in place!

2) Install an SCCA-approved roll cage

3) Install an SCCA-approved fire extinguisher system

4) Install either a 5-point or 6-point safety harness (I recommend the 6-point, trust me on this)

5) Install a lighweight racing seat (Sparco makes an affordable one)

6) Install an SCCA-approved window net

7) Add lead ballast to bring the car up to the SCCA minumum weight.

8) Drain the brake fluid and replace it with Motul 300C.

9) Get an SCCA-approved two-layer Nomex (one piece) driving suit and Nomex underwear; Nomex driving shoes (two layer); Nomex gloves (three layer, skin on the hands is the hardest to graft); Nomex socks; Nomex balaclava; Get an SCCA-approved full-coverage helmet (Nomex/Kevlar-lined, not a motorcycle helmet); Get an SCCA-approved HANS device.

10) (optional but helpful) Get a two-way voice communications system from Motorola's Racing Radios division.

11) Get your helmet painted by Troy Designs (there is a 6-month wait) and get them to install the earphones, microphone, and drink bottle tube for you. Get good earplugs.

12) (Optional) Get a Wells Cargo trailer to haul the car to the track. You can rent a trailer until you get bucks-up enough to buy one (perhaps used). Rent a Chevy pickup truck to pull the trailer.

13) Get to the gym and get used to heavy exertion in temperatures approaching 120 degrees wearing long underwear (Nomex) and the driving suit for a minimum 50 minutes. Every pound you lose is one less pound the engine has to drag around a road course, and the brakes have to stop. Do as much to strengthen your upper body, arm and neck muscles as possible. 50 minutes doesn't sound like much, but at those temperatures, and with the lateral G loads, fatigue and dehydration are your two main enemies at the beginning. Pay attention to your leg muscles. On an 11-turn road course you will average three downshifts and three upshifts per turn per lap for about 28 laps (or 50 minutes, whichever comes first, thank you TV). That's a lot of clutch and brake pedal action. Get used to sweat stinging your eyes.

14) Get to a driving school. Bragg-Smith, Bondurant, Justin Bell, et. al., are all good and attendence at two will speed the process of obtaining an SCCA Pro Racing license. Heel-and-toe downshifting, car control, the meaning of flags, etc., are all taught at these schools and are absolutely required knowledge not only to get even an SCCA amateur license, but to avoid looking like an idiot on the race track. If you don't get threshold braking, trail braking, and heel-and-toe downshifting to be second nature you'll probably break the car, then become a serious agricultural racer.

15) Get a sponsor, even a small sponsor. One begets two, two begets three, etc.

Have a budget for spares, consumables (tires, brake pads, brake rotors, belts), and body panels. It's not a question of if you break/hit something, it's a question of when and how bad.

They say that racing is the art and science of turning money into noise. They also say that you can make a small fortune in racing, if you start out with a big one.

Two best things an instructor ever told me: "See everything, look at nothing" (John Powell, Powell Motorsports), and "Look where you want to go, not where you are going" (Johnny O'Connell, Russell Motorsports).

As the Italians say, in bocca a lupo!
 

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Storm King said:
Wow , Thanks for the info. What other mods do you recomend. and adjustments.

What's your budget?

For $49,950 you can purchase the 2002 Z06 John Heinricy drove to victory in the 2002 SCCA Touring 1 championship. The owner has additional spares. It is a turn-key race-ready setup.

Call Kevin Mixon at (972) 424-2706.

 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sorry, my buget will not allow that car, it would be a good ride though. I'm looking to race for fun in my spare time. I don't plan to be competive. Just a fun car to drive and race. I like Corvettes and I herd that they were the easyest to put on the track with few mods to have a good time. Of coarse I will pay more for the car upfront, but I have a buddy that is a dealer and an avid dragracer, and he says there are ways to get a car for what i'm going to use it for that aren't as choice, but will be solid and that is fine for me because when I wad it up I won't feel so bad. That being said I'm looking for help on exactly what involved.
 

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Storm King said:
Sorry, my buget will not allow that car,... it would be a good ride though. I'm looking to race for fun in my spare time. I don't plan to be competive. Just a fun car to drive and race. I like Corvettes and I herd that they were the easyest to put on the track with few mods to have a good time. Of coarse I will pay more for the car upfront, but I have a buddy that is a dealer and an avid dragracer, and he says there are ways to get a car for what i'm going to use it for that aren't as choice, but will be solid and that is fine for me because when I wad it up I won't feel so bad. That being said I'm looking for help on exactly what involved.
No problem. The most important thing to look for when buying a beater for the track is "has the chassis been bent?". It can have horrible paint, a thorougly trashed interior, and all kinds of features that don't work (AC, radio, power-windows) but as long as the chassis is cherry you have a baseline for suspension setup and tuning.

Keep in mind however that installing the required safety equipment, purchasing the driver's suit and related apparel, and other incidentals will run you about $15,000. Figure that a C5 will run you $20,000, and that's $35,000 just to get in the game.

A better alternative is what is called "Arrive and Drive", or more pejoratively "Rent-a-ride". There are race teams in various classes that field a third car that they rent to someone for the weekend. Fees vary, but most include a kind of deductable that covers them if you total the car. Believe it or not you can purchase insurance that covers vehicle damage in a race. It's expensive, and it too has a steep deductable, but can be very helpful should you totally trash the car.

Your best source of information is your local SCCA region. They will know of teams that offer arrive and drive programs.

The beauty of these programs is that you can concentrate solely on driving, leaving the car setup, repair, and transportation to the race team. You literally show up on Thursday afternoon for practice with your helmet bag and driving suit and drive. Make sure you get a helmet bag. You'll get a lot of questions in the airport departure lounge. 50% of the people will think it's a bowling ball and that you are very strong.
 

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Originally posted by Gary96LT4 ...<br>
For door to door Corvette racing:
http://www.tccracing.com/

They tell what you need to do to race on the site.:cool:<br>
Very nice site, crammed with info. They race at five of the best tracks in North America and have classes for older C4 and new C5 cars.

Take the figures they give for putting together a competititve car (a '91 C4) for around $10,000 with a grain of salt. They don't add labor in there and they assume you will open up a flee market to sell the parts you remove from the car. And driiving suit, helmet, gloves, shoes, pads, balaclava, radio, all must be incuded.

But still cheap, if only to comptete in five races spread all over North America. Wish they'd add Laguna Seca and Mosport Park.

The TCC minimum weight is 3100 pounds, including the driver, at the conclusion of the race. Good for me (I'm only 130 lbs).

The original poster, StromKing, may still not be satisfied however since I think he's loolking for suspension settings, parts, etc.. Problem is he doesn't have a car yet.

Still, it sounds like just the ticket for people who want to race against other Vetts. I'm going to check it out.

Thanks!

Good find!:thumbsup:

Ray
 

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Originally posted by Storm King ...<br>
Hello every one, New member, I am enterested in trying club road racing. I do not own a Corvette yet, but I was thinking of a C5. Does anyone know what is needed to race (car prep) and what classes are avalible for the C5. I know this is a broad subject. I have to start somewhere, so letter-rip<br>
We currently compete in the Southeast Div of SCCA, the division in which you would race. T1 usually runs with our class (GT1) so you would be on track at the same time. If I can help with information, email us at [email protected].

I would suggest that you get a current SCCA rule book before making any modifications. You might also want to look into buying a GT1 car that either is or could be a C5 Corvette bodied car. In my experience, a tubeframe (GT1) car is easier and in many cases cheaper to run and maintain than a stock based car. It would probably be much faster and getting lapped 3 times in a 30 minute race is not fun no matter what you are driving.


You would be Central Florida Region. http://www.cfrscca.org/ There is a race at Sebring on Thanksgiving weekend. If you contact a CFR member, perhaps they could give you a guest pass to check out the action.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Great thanks, I am still reading and look at all the possibilities, and what is out there that I can afford. I am a lowly Fire Fighter. I work for the Government. Low $$$$. I know that I will get lapped many times. I also have not talked to my parole/loan officer (the wife) yet if it is even possible. I am trying to get as much information as possible before I make my presentation. What I was looking for is to be able to drive the car to the track, race and drive home...If possible. I am trying to keep the car edge of street legal with some mod and race in a class with other cars that are some what the same. If I get lapped so be it, I am having fun driving and its a Corvette. Trailered cars are a whole nother gig that I am not ready for, I have to start low and slow. If I happen to not like it. I have not dumped wads of money in it and I still have a Corvette that is fun to drive. Is there a class that I would fit in driving a C5?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Why will I not get lapped? is there passing? or is this autocross?You have to treat me like a kid I or Sgt. Shultz "I know nothing" So please explain.
 

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Originally posted by Storm King ...<br>
Why will I not get lapped? is there passing? or is this autocross?You have to treat me like a kid I or Sgt. Shultz "I know nothing" So please explain.<br>
Of course.

In one post you wrote

I don't plan to be competive [sic]
If you don't plan on being competitive you'll end up a moving chicane on the track. The other guys who are competitive are not going to very happy about that and it's not very sporting to expect them to be.

In another post you wrote

If I get lapped so be it
If you don't plan on being competitive, count on being lapped, again, and again, and again, until eventually you're involved in a shunt, damaging your car and potentially others. No one will be happy about that.

In a third post you wrote

What I was looking for is to be able to drive the car to the track, race and drive home...If possible.
Okay, quite simply those days ended in the early 1960's. You simply can not race without safety equipment, including a cage, and all the other required stuff (see an earlier post for a detailed list of the stuff). Even SCCA Solo I, which gets you out on a race track for hot laps with no other cars requires essentially the same equipment you need for SCCA T1. Technically these cars are supposed to be "showroom stock". They still have the cats, the lights, etc., but they are hardly capable of literally being driven several hundred miles to and from an event (the suspension settings for track use make the car a tail-happy accident-waiting-to-happen on the freeway). Besides, are you going to drive to and from the event on your race tires? I know you don't plan on being competitive, but do you have any idea how fragile tires are that are molded to racing-depth? What happens if you get a flat?

Are there guys that do drive a car to the track and race it? Yep. A few of them even win. But these guys are very experienced mechanics above all else.

The only series where you can "run what you brung" and drive it to and from the track, is SCCA Solo II, aka autocross. This is the only series where all you need is a cheap helmet and your OEM 3-point seat belts (okay, they do make you take all the loose stuff out of the back, but that's about it for tech inspection).

As I pointed out previously, the best way to find out if you even like road racing is to rent a ride. Or attend a driving school (you actually have to do the latter before the former). Bondurant, Justin Bell (not far from you near Palm Beach), or any of a dozen other SCCA-approved and non-approved schools will give you training and a feel for what it is really like. You'd be amazed how many people decide that wearing long underwear in July in Chandler, Arizona is not fun at all. Some of them quit on day one of the program (and it's in the contract, no refunds). My advice is to find out if this is really something you want to do before you spend any money on a car, any car.

Therefore asking for detailed information on car setup, costs, etc., is purely academic and premature.

Something you might want to consider: Solo II actually requires more car control skills than road racing. Sound odd? Consider that in Solo II you get a total of three runs on the course, you don't get any practice laps, you have to memorize the course, and most Solo II courses are designed by the Miata Owners Club and therefore are a bitch to drive a Corvette on. Therefore missing one apex by 6 inches will leave you well down in the standings. In road racing, you get practice laps, and the race lasts from 30-50 minutes so blowing one corner or one whole lap isn't all that bad, but it's going to cost you a small fortune.

Imagine if someone said to you "Tell me everything I need to know to be a fireman, bearing in mind that I'm really not all that interested in getting near fire, but I like riding on the truck".
 

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Originally posted by RT66Z06 ...<br>
Of course.



As I pointed out previously, the best way to find out if you even like road racing is to rent a ride. Or attend a driving school (you actually have to do the latter before the former). Bondurant, Justin Bell (not far from you near Palm Beach), or any of a dozen other SCCA-approved and non-approved schools will give you training and a feel for what it is really like. You'd be amazed how many people decide that wearing long underwear in July in Chandler, Arizona is not fun at all. Some of them quit on day one of the program (and it's in the contract, no refunds). My advice is to find out if this is really something you want to do before you spend any money on a car, any car.
Just an FYI..Justin bell is out of business.

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/zerothread?id=668270
 
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