Corvette Forum : DigitalCorvettes.com Corvette Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,300 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
By Joshua Rhett Miller

Since the dawn of modern warfare, the best way to stay alive in the face of incoming fire has been to take cover behind a wall. But thanks to a game-changing "revolutionary" rifle, the U.S. Army has made that tactic dead on arrival. Now the enemy can run, but he can't hide.

After years of development, the U.S. Army has unleashed a new weapon in Afghanistan -- the XM25 Counter Defilade Target Engagement System, a high-tech rifle that can be programmed so that its 25-mm. ammunition does not necessarily explode on impact. Instead, it can be set to detonate either in front of or behind a target, meaning it literally will go through a wall before it explodes and kills the enemy.

It also has a range of roughly 2,300 feet -- nearly the length of eight football fields -- making it possible to fire at targets well past the range of the rifles and carbines that most soldiers carry today.

Lt. Col. Christopher Lehner, project manager for the semi-automatic, shoulder-fired weapon system for the U.S. Army's Program Executive Office Soldier, said that the XM25's capability alone is such a "game-changer" that it'll lead to new ways of fighting on the battlefield, beginning this month in Afghanistan.

"With this weapon system, we take away cover from [enemy targets] forever," Lehner told FoxNews.com on Wednesday. "Tactics are going to have to be rewritten. The only thing we can see [enemies] being able to do is run away."

And that would make it much easier for U.S. troops to put them in their sights, either with that same XM25 or another direct-fire weapon.

With this new weapon in the Army's arsenal, Lehner said, "We're much more effective, by many magnitudes, than current weapons at the squad level. We're able to shoot farther and more accurately, and our soldiers can stay behind sandbags, walls or rocks, which provides them protection from fire."

Lehner said the first XM25s were distributed to combat units in Afghanistan this month. The 12-pound, 29-inch system, which was designed by Minnesota's Alliant Techsystems, costs up to $35,000 per unit and, while highly sophisticated, is so easy to use that soldiers become proficient within minutes.

"That's how intuitively easy it is, even though it's high-tech," Lehner said. "All a soldier needs to know how to do is laze the target. It decimates anything within its lethal radius."

Once the trigger is pulled and the round leaves the barrel, a computer chip inside the projectile communicates exactly how far it has traveled, allowing for precise detonation behind or ahead of any target.

"We have found that this has really made our soldiers so much more accurate and being able to deliver this high-explosive round in about five seconds," said Lehner, taking into account the time it takes a soldier to laze, aim and fire the weapon. Once fired, Lehner said, the round will reach its target in a "second or two," meaning the entire process from aiming to direct hit lasts less than 10 seconds, compared to 10 minutes or longer for traditional mortar fire.

A potential battlefield scenario, according to Army officials, might go something like this:

-- A patrol encounters an enemy combatant in a walled Afghan village who fires an AK-47 intermittently from behind cover, exposing himself only for a brief second to fire.

-- The patrol's leader calls for the XM25 gunman, who uses the weapon's laser range finder to calculate the distance to the target.

-- He then uses an incremental button located near the trigger to add 1 meter to the round's distance, since the enemy is hiding behind a wall.

-- The round is fired, and it explodes with a blast comparable to a hand grenade past the wall and above the enemy.

"This is revolutionary for many reasons," Lehner said, citing increased efficiency, safety and lethality. "This is the first time we're putting smart technology in an individual weapon system for our soldiers. We feel it's very important to field this because it keeps us ahead of the technological curve of our potential enemies. We have a feeling other people will try to copy us -- this is the future."

Lehner said the Army plans to purchase at least 12,500 XM25 systems beginning next year -- enough for one system in each infantry squad and Special Forces team.

The military isn't overly concerned that the weapon might be captured by the enemy, because they would be unable to obtain its highly specialized ammunition, batteries and other components. Lehner said he expects other nations will try to copy its technology, but it will be very cost-prohibitive.

"This is a game-changer," Lehner said. "The enemy has learned to get cover, for hundreds if not thousands of years.

"Well, they can't do that anymore. We're taking that cover from them and there's only two outcomes: We're going to get you behind that cover or force you to flee. So no matter what, we gotcha."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,106 Posts
With this new weapon in the Army's arsenal, Lehner said, "We're much more effective, by many magnitudes, than current weapons at the squad level. We're able to shoot farther and more accurately, and our soldiers can stay behind sandbags, walls or rocks, which provides them protection from fire."


until they get a working copy of our weapon..:crazy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
798 Posts
How much is the ammo??

$10,000 per bullet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,607 Posts
Thats cool! I want one in COD Black Ops. :laughing:


With this new weapon in the Army's arsenal, Lehner said, "We're much more effective, by many magnitudes, than current weapons at the squad level. We're able to shoot farther and more accurately, and our soldiers can stay behind sandbags, walls or rocks, which provides them protection from fire."


until they get a working copy of our weapon..:crazy:
I imagine ammo will be difficult to get. But then again, I wouldnt be surprised if the US sells it to someone else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
until they get a working copy of our weapon..:crazy:
According to the second paragraph it's already working and deployed.

IIRC, the XM25 project was actually started back in 2004/5 as a way to recover some of the costs from the XM29 which got canned. So the concept and design work has been going on for close to, if not longer than, a decade already.
 

·
I have an Acer now.
Joined
·
4,591 Posts
Why do all new futuristic wonder weapons have to look like big fat chunky plastic blobs wielded people who are also chubby blobs?

Also is this thing suppose to be a rifle like the M-16 or a grenade launcher?

Another thing, I read that each gun costs $25,000, how much do the bullets cost? I know that the 20mm shells used by the CIWS are $27 each and it costs $1800 per second to fire, Practice rounds for the navy's 57mm mk3 deck gun cost $1200 each, a single 120mm armor piercing shell for the Abrams is $8000 and a hellfire missiles are $80,000 each.

I guess we can't prevent reverse engineering of our weapons but we can make it too expensive for our enemies to produce. The high price of everything the military uses seems like it could come back to bite us one day. I read somewhere that about 200,000 bullets are fired for every enemy killed in Iraq, compared to 20,000 in Vietnam and at the same time the cost of each bullet will be going up too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,548 Posts


about $30 a cartridge makes it a BARGAIN:thumbsup:

remember the projectile is 25mm or about 1" in diam.
so this picture shows it about twice its real size(at least on my screen)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,914 Posts
Douche... :laughing:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
798 Posts
:D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,766 Posts
These superguns will probably be used like most of the other high tech toys that we've seen recently - for marketing the military and intimidating the enemy. The vast majority of soldiers will never touch them.

And rounds like that aren't new.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,548 Posts
Honestly who the **** cares what it and ammo cost if it will save American lives?
trust me when I tell you that if ammo's reasonably cheap theres going to be far less of a tendency to restrict use and access of the weapons,to the guys in the field, and more will be issued.
during the viet nam fiasco there were actually requests made to limit the amount of ammo soldiers were issued
my cousin was in gulf 1 and they got verbally reprimanded by an officer once for calling in Apache helicopters to take out a bunker instead of artillery support
, he informed them that requesting a couple 155 mm shells on target was a good deal less expensive and easier to justify than calling in a gunship on a stationary target, and since they had been well inside the range of the local artillery support that gunships were only to be used in emergency's or on moving targets
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
The U.N. said it was unfair for only the U.S.A to have these guns so we must donate some to China and Iran o ya Russia too. Obama said to insure piece we should share them. lol
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top