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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No one exports more jobs than GE's Jeffrey Immelt. Sounds like a good villain for the left right? Wrong.. just more verification of the hypocrisy. :laughing: Mr.Ineedahandoutorsubsidy is going to make sure jobs are created, but where?

Obama Teams Up With G.E.; Iran Palaver Peters Out; 2012 Arrives At White House

“Jeff Immelt’s experience at G.E. and his understanding of the vital role the private sector plays in creating jobs and making America competitive makes him up to the challenge of leading this new council.”

-- Statement from President Obama announcing that G.E. CEO Jeff Immelt will lead the new President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness.

When Democrats said President Obama was “pro-business,” we didn’t know they meant one business in particular.

There are a few companies on the Obama corporate A List – Democratic patrons Google and Goldman Sachs both turn up again and again at White House functions and for special recognition – but no company seems to get the VIP treatment that General Electric receives.

Obama will announce today on a visit to a G.E. plant in Schenectady, N.Y. that G.E. CEO Jeffrey Immelt will lead his new Council on Jobs and Competitiveness. The panel replaces the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board led by former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volker.


Volker, who helped President Ronald Reagan whip inflation and launch two decades of growth, will be replaced by Immelt, who has often spoken of his desire to put G.E. on the inside track for government subsidies and incentives in the Obama era.


Whether it is pushing the president’s plan for global warming fees in order to create demand for his “Ecomagination” line of windmills, solar panels, etc., boosting the president’s national health-care law as part of an effort to sell more medical equipment, or enthusing over the Obama strategy of making loans available for industrial exporters, Immelt has been an Obama stalwart all along. Immelt has also consistently argued to shareholders that there is big money to be made in advancing the Democratic agenda.


While most corporate leaders have taken a wait and see approach to Obama’s occasional overtures to the private sector, G.E., along with Google, Goldman and few others, have backed him to the hilt.


It is unclear how the administration plans to deal with the ethics challenges created by having a CEO whose income is determined by stock performance leading a panel designed to recommend government policies. G.E. (2009 revenue: $157 billion) is a huge government contractor and is always in the market for new subsidies and incentives.


Immelt’s shareholders certainly had to think that access had its benefits this week when the Obama administration signed off on a plan to allow the company to spin off under-performing NBC to cable giant Comcast.


Though intended to show Obama’s coolness with corporate America, the Immelt pick will likely reinforce the perception in American boardrooms that Obama likes to play favorites when it comes to the economy.

He’s visited so many battery makers that his staff must now be coated in a thin layer of nickel-cadmium. And while Obama plays rough with the oil and coal industries, he can’t say enough good about technology firms and “green jobs.”


And while Volker was said to have always been locked out of the Obama inner circle, Immelt should have the president’s ear. Immelt’s campaign donations and constant boosterism of the Obama agenda should provide a solid foundation for becoming a close adviser to the president, or perhaps just making that advisory role official.

The suspicious eye that will be cast on Immelt, though, may lessen his ability to provide the connection to the business world Obama has promised. Other CEOs are unlikely to see a competitor who pushes policies explicitly to benefit his company as an ally in the fight for a fair, free market.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/201...ver-peters-arrives-white-house/#ixzz1BgSJ53vS
 

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what did you expect? the CEO of the Obama for president propaganda news network did his job for a reason the last 4 years :lookinup:

Hey, atleast its transparent......not just in the open, but we can see right through:rolling:
 

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There is so much about this that is wrong...
Number 1 is Imelt himself.
 

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There is so much about this that is wrong...
Number 1 is Imelt himself.
Wrong is an under statement :surprised Its looks and feels like insider trading all in the good for the GE union :smack
 

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Wrong is an under statement :surprised Its looks and feels like insider trading all in the good for the GE union :smack
If you go back to some of my previous posts regarding Imelt you'll see I have a very negative opinion of him. He's a scumbag to the core, and if birds of a feather flock together...
 

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While Imelt and Obama are certainly hypocrites for pretending Imelt is some kind of jobs guru or that Obama cares anything about keeping jobs here, they are not the culprits in the job exporting story. If Americans want to keep manufacturing jobs here, they must first be completely willing to pay 20-50% more for every manufactured product they buy. I guarantee you they are not. Americans are thrift shoppers, always looking for the lowest price. This cultural feature of thrift is a good thing, but in a world of modern communications and transportation, a product can be made pretty much anywhere and moved around the world for sale if needed. Corporations and government are not to blame for job outsourcing. Our desire for $300 flat panel TV's and $10 hair dryers is. It's time for a little honest self examination on this issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
While Imelt and Obama are certainly hypocrites for pretending Imelt is some kind of jobs guru or that Obama cares anything about keeping jobs here, they are not the culprits in the job exporting story. If Americans want to keep manufacturing jobs here, they must first be completely willing to pay 20-50% more for every manufactured product they buy. I guarantee you they are not. Americans are thrift shoppers, always looking for the lowest price. This cultural feature of thrift is a good thing, but in a world of modern communications and transportation, a product can be made pretty much anywhere and moved around the world for sale if needed. Corporations and government are not to blame for job outsourcing. Our desire for $300 flat panel TV's and $10 hair dryers is. It's time for a little honest self examination on this issue.
So, the stupid American consumer is at fault? :laughing: How about fiscal and monetary policy? How about unfair trade agreements that do not benefit the American people? Americans are like anyone else, they want the best price, but the driving factors for outsourcing are poor policy driven by the wealthy elite. They are the ONLY ones who benefit and if you think I am just "slamming the rich" well your right... when it comes down to setting policy that hurts this country, they are the blame.
 

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While Imelt and Obama are certainly hypocrites for pretending Imelt is some kind of jobs guru or that Obama cares anything about keeping jobs here, they are not the culprits in the job exporting story. If Americans want to keep manufacturing jobs here, they must first be completely willing to pay 20-50% more for every manufactured product they buy. I guarantee you they are not. Americans are thrift shoppers, always looking for the lowest price. This cultural feature of thrift is a good thing, but in a world of modern communications and transportation, a product can be made pretty much anywhere and moved around the world for sale if needed. Corporations and government are not to blame for job outsourcing. Our desire for $300 flat panel TV's and $10 hair dryers is. It's time for a little honest self examination on this issue.
:agree:
 

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So, the stupid American consumer is at fault? :laughing: How about fiscal and monetary policy? How about unfair trade agreements that do not benefit the American people? Americans are like anyone else, they want the best price, but the driving factors for outsourcing are poor policy driven by the wealthy elite. They are the ONLY ones who benefit and if you think I am just "slamming the rich" well your right... when it comes down to setting policy that hurts this country, they are the blame.
"Policy" does not affect price nearly as much as labor costs. Those are all factors, but I'm telling you the number one reason jobs are outsourced is that we all buy the cheapest product we can buy that fits the need - every single time. We do not pay any attention to where it was made. Do you want to pay $600 for a 32 inch flat panel TV? I don't, but if it is made in the USA that is what it will cost. There is no way around the fact that the number one expense in every company is payroll, and that cost feeds directly into the cost of their goods or services. Convince the vast majority of Americans to pay 50% more for all of their goods and you will have a shot at getting jobs back here. Otherwise we might as well figure out how to prosper with the new reality.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
"Policy" does not affect price nearly as much as labor costs.
That is a neocon myth. The unionized labor force in America has never been all that large of a percentage in the overall workforce. And labor is something that can be addressed for any company, by moving to a right-to-work state. Don't like the strong arms in Illinois? Move to Texas..

Those are all factors, but I'm telling you the number one reason jobs are outsourced is that we all buy the cheapest product we can buy that fits the need - every single time. We do not pay any attention to where it was made. Do you want to pay $600 for a 32 inch flat panel TV? I don't, but if it is made in the USA that is what it will cost.
Making things artificially cheaper, by gaming monetary and trade policies is an epic fail, for everyone involved. Those TV's should cost $600 instead of $300... and if those jobs were still in the US, it wouldn't matter because then your workforce would be making those items, paying taxes on that income, and exporting them. Letting countries run amok with our policies, that only benefit one group in this country is stupid, hell it's criminal.

There is no way around the fact that the number one expense in every company is payroll, and that cost feeds directly into the cost of their goods or services. Convince the vast majority of Americans to pay 50% more for all of their goods and you will have a shot at getting jobs back here. Otherwise we might as well figure out how to prosper with the new reality.
The new reality is, de-development. There aren't jobs for the people in college now, and if your over 50 good luck getting anything besides walmart greeter positions. There are going to be a lot of tough pills to swallow in the next few years, and this is going to have to be one of them.
 

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Your arguments ring of right-wing whacko catch-phrases and villain hunting. Face it - building products with $2/hr labor is far cheaper than building it with $20/hr labor. There is no escaping or ignoring that fact. And when I talked about "labor" above, I wasn't talking about unions. I was talking about workers. You can't put numbers on your villains because they are concepts not concrete facts. I put numbers on mine above that are irrefutable. You are wearing blinders. You are determined to not see the root cause for job outsourcing and that is the high cost of American labor. I'm not saying that is good or bad. It is a simple fact.
 

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Your arguments ring of right-wing whacko catch-phrases and villain hunting. Face it - building products with $2/hr labor is far cheaper than building it with $20/hr labor. There is no escaping or ignoring that fact. And when I talked about "labor" above, I wasn't talking about unions. I was talking about workers. You can't put numbers on your villains because they are concepts not concrete facts. I put numbers on mine above that are irrefutable. You are wearing blinders. You are determined to not see the root cause for job outsourcing and that is the high cost of American labor. I'm not saying that is good or bad. It is a simple fact.
:agree:

While some national labor and trade policies may come into play-- someone quick to bash the FED (newb) often times forgets it's the local NIMBY policies and local unions and local work force and local gov't entities that don't allow for or provide incentives for new growth in their areas. Also local in some areas refuse to see the big picture when they can't export their products because the quid pro quo may be for the subsidy of another product in a different local market to counter the import of an item.
For instance we may get cheap TVs abroad because Labor is cheapest in some parts of the US that no one wants to live in. And where there is a labor force most locals don't want another "toxic" plant in the area.. So the plant never gets built.
Then combine that with the country who sends US cheap stuff may be buying our cheap technology for wind turbines or chip manufacturing-- and that quid pro quo isn't seen in the local market where they used to make TVs so the local market must assume it's not hapenning..
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Your arguments ring of right-wing whacko catch-phrases and villain hunting. Face it - building products with $2/hr labor is far cheaper than building it with $20/hr labor. There is no escaping or ignoring that fact. And when I talked about "labor" above, I wasn't talking about unions. I was talking about workers. You can't put numbers on your villains because they are concepts not concrete facts. I put numbers on mine above that are irrefutable. You are wearing blinders. You are determined to not see the root cause for job outsourcing and that is the high cost of American labor. I'm not saying that is good or bad. It is a simple fact.
Right wing, left wing, whacko policy is still whacko policy. You can't let people who make $2/hr sell products in markets that don't have $2/hr labor. Trade imbalances must be fixed, bad monetary policy coupled with bad trade policies hurt the US worker. No way around it.. if your gonna set environmental policy for a workforce, you must ensure that workforce is competing with the same enviro policy in all markets. If an enviro group has enough influence to set policy in a state, so be it, go to a state that don't cater to those radical groups.

China does not have the same local/enviro/human/monetary policies we do, so a tariff must be established to balance it so our workforce can compete with them in the world. Call it protectionism, it is. Protecting US jobs has to be #1 over kissing foreign ass, or lining the pockets of a small group.

The other choice is bringing hte US down to 3rd world standards.. and that is not a good choice for the US.

Posts #8 & #12 should tell you, your on the wrong side of this.
 

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Right wing, left wing, whacko policy is still whacko policy. You can't let people who make $2/hr sell products in markets that don't have $2/hr labor. Trade imbalances must be fixed, bad monetary policy coupled with bad trade policies hurt the US worker. No way around it.. if your gonna set environmental policy for a workforce, you must ensure that workforce is competing with the same enviro policy in all markets. If an enviro group has enough influence to set policy in a state, so be it, go to a state that don't cater to those radical groups.

China does not have the same local/enviro/human/monetary policies we do, so a tariff must be established to balance it so our workforce can compete with them in the world. Call it protectionism, it is. Protecting US jobs has to be #1 over kissing foreign ass, or lining the pockets of a small group.

The other choice is bringing hte US down to 3rd world standards.. and that is not a good choice for the US.

Posts #8 & #12 should tell you, your on the wrong side of this.
I agree with everything you said and you just proved my point. The problem is $2 labor vs. $20 labor. If you want to forbid that trade, be sure and let Americans know that everything just went up 50%. There is a steep penalty for that protectionism. That's all I was saying all along. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I agree with everything you said and you just proved my point. The problem is $2 labor vs. $20 labor. If you want to forbid that trade, be sure and let Americans know that everything just went up 50%. There is a steep penalty for that protectionism. That's all I was saying all along. :thumbsup:
Well then just say it! :laughing: Don't go messing with me on a Friday, at least not until I get the Crown open.. :devil:

It is a steep penalty, but if you can get unemployment into the 5% range, it's a small price to pay for stability.
 

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What ever happened to nationalism? Im psuedo with Newb on this one. We need policies which promote the US in the world. China (i admit is not the best example due to communist policies but try to stay with me) is instituting policies which promote their own country's future. They are refusing to export rare raw materials, forcing companies to hire chinese workers to process them and build products before shipping them to the world.

Our policy of importing is not sustainable.
 

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What ever happened to nationalism? Im psuedo with Newb on this one. We need policies which promote the US in the world. China (i admit is not the best example due to communist policies but try to stay with me) is instituting policies which promote their own country's future. They are refusing to export rare raw materials, forcing companies to hire chinese workers to process them and build products before shipping them to the world.

Our policy of importing is not sustainable.
Ok let's assume I agree with the two of you. How do you think this scenario would work out? Obama goes on TV and outlines how foreign cheap labor has undercut American jobs and he has a new policy to deal with it. As of tomorrow, no more foreign manufactured goods can be imported into the US without a 100% tariff. Manufacturing jobs will certainly follow and hundreds of thousands of jobs will be created. Of course there will be some shared pain and everyone should expect all manufactured goods to rise in price from 50 to 100 percent. But that is a small price to pay for getting America back in the manufacturing business.
My guess is that the only thing people would hear is everything you buy will go up 50 to 100 percent. Folks your solutions would not work in 100 years. Less than 10 percent of Americans would benefit from the scenario and 90 percent would pay through the nose and vote everyone in sight out of office.
 

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Countries that isolate themselves from the rest of the world (in one way or another) do not tend to do very well.
 

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Why are we all worried about China? Here's my take on the whole thing: China can not sustain it's current level of economic growth for a couple of reasons but mainly because they are manipulating their currency. They need to maintain their engine of growth...exports. By purposely manipulating its currency to keep the value low the better the result for exporters. If their currency was allowed to appreciate their exports would not look so enticing to outsiders. At the same time they are manipulating their currency they are understating inflation in an attempt to make their economy appear to be in better shape than it is. When the state controls all aspects of an economy they can make it appear to be what ever they want when in reality it is merely a house of cards.

As I am sure many of you recall, in the late 1980's and early 1990's many were making the same predictions about Japan's economy taking over the world. Well we now see that the results of their economic manipulation have left them in tatters. China simply can not continue at its current stated pace of growth without the whole thing collapsing around them. Given time, their house of cards will crumble too. I also don't see them trying to sell off a large portion of their bonds any time soon because it would cause the yields in the bond market to plummet effectively causing the value of their bonds to plummet as well.
 
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