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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would running cross drilled rotors make a significant change in how hot the calipers get and therefore reduce the chance of boiling the brake fluid? Mainly interested in if the cross drilled would limit heat transfer and keep my brake fluid from boiling and or brake fade also. I am going to flush the system with Valvoline synthetic with 500* boiling point that meets both Dot 3 & 4 specs...to help with fluid boiling....but what about cross drilled rotors?

Have not had the opportunity to auto-x the car yet...but want to be ready when I do go for it.
 

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IMO, NO, But I wait for the smart people to say something....

TT and Norval, and a few others.....

:huh:
 

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Cross drilling rotors is a purely cosmetic upgrade. It accomplished nothing. If you do not buy special rotors with holes cast into them they will crack, and your brakes will fail. (I asked dave hill this question when they were debuting the C6)

Strider did a really good job cross drilling his but he isnt involved in performance driving. He also has a machine shop to make his own rotors when they start to crack.

A couple of the suppliers makes slotted rotors and that will probably accomplish what you want to accomplish if they arent anything more than snake oil like cross drilling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am thinking that if rotos temps are reduced, then the caliper temps would be reduced...hence the brake fluid temps reduced?
 

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Cross-drilled rotors reduce ROTOR temperatures.

I was thinking not. It seems to me the rotor would be a less effective air pump with the holes.

drilling gives the pad a better bite. I would not be adverse to running them on my track days. You just have to keep an eye on them and when they start to crack put a new one on.

Its a LOT of work to sit there and drill all those holes. Probably the biggest disadvantage for me.
 

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I was thinking not. It seems to me the rotor would be a less effective air pump with the holes.

drilling gives the pad a better bite. I would not be adverse to running them on my track days. You just have to keep an eye on them and when they start to crack put a new one on.

Its a LOT of work to sit there and drill all those holes. Probably the biggest disadvantage for me.
Okay. Let me re-phrase that. Cross-drilling will NOT reduce caliper temps. Agree or disagree Turtle?
 

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Okay. Let me re-phrase that. Cross-drilling will NOT reduce caliper temps. Agree or disagree Turtle?
cross drilled rotors will not reduce caliper temps

cross drilled rotors will not reduce rotor temps.

it will not reduce temps here or there

it will not reduce temps anywhere

almost certain i am.......but i do like green eggs and ham.
 

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cross drilled rotors will not reduce caliper temps

cross drilled rotors will not reduce rotor temps.

it will not reduce temps here or there

it will not reduce temps anywhere

almost certain i am.......but i do like green eggs and ham.
That is FUNNY ****.
 

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Just redid the front pads on a E250 I use for pulling the car trailer.

It has pretty hefty 2 piston calipers.

The pistons were made of some type of plastic composite.

Now that should give someone some ammo to fabrixcate something to prevent boiling.
 

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Just redid the front pads on a E250 I use for pulling the car trailer.

It has pretty hefty 2 piston calipers.

The pistons were made of some type of plastic composite.

Now that should give someone some ammo to fabrixcate something to prevent boiling.
Ceramic maybe?
 

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i got some various thicknesses of titanium plate off of ebay for around $40.

trace the outline of the pad and cut it out. Remember to also drill a hole to retain its position.

they sell these heat shields for high end cars for several hundred.

easy to make your own.

you may have trouble getting them behind brand new pads. Not enough room. Thats why i wanted a thin set and a thick set.
 

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Would ceramic coated steel work also? I have a full set of steel ones (I think they are steel) That I could have ceramic coated.

I asked on cf road race forum and they said that you could over heat the pad if you use isolators.

Edit: how thick of titanium do you use?
 

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Would ceramic coated steel work also? I have a full set of steel ones (I think they are steel) That I could have ceramic coated.

I asked on cf road race forum and they said that you could over heat the pad if you use isolators.

Edit: how thick of titanium do you use?
chris, is the ceramic going to crack? What are you going to have coated? The back of the pad? Then have to throw the pad away?

Who said that on the road race forum? Its a least of evils thing. Do you really want to use the pistons and brake fluid as a heat sink?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
wow!!! this thread got a lot of attention quick. Thanks for the responses...I had seen a vette on the CF that the guy said he picked up cross drilled stock size rotors from Nappa of all places. I think his vette was forsale recently.

It was my understanding that the cross drilled kept brake fade to a minimum from reduced rotor heat if you are using them in some serious auto-x runs.

Well...I guess I can save myself a few bucks here on doing any of this stuff except for a full brake system flush. The previous owner (3 years ago) installed the complete kit from Stainless Steel Brakes and I stop very hard and fast...but I have no idea about auto-x.
 

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Just redid the front pads on a E250 I use for pulling the car trailer.

It has pretty hefty 2 piston calipers.

The pistons were made of some type of plastic composite.

Now that should give someone some ammo to fabrixcate something to prevent boiling.


The Corvette had phoenelic(sp) plastic insulators on brake pistons as far back as 1965.......around 1967 they started using a thicker insulator......part of the J-56 package. the object of holes in the rotor was to release the outgassing of brake pads...I don`t thing current pads outgas much......I use SRF brake fluid, the only time it ever failed me was my Zero Tolerance O-ring brake piston experiment.......I couldn`t get that junk off my car fast enough!! If your boiling brake fluid SRF is the answer....you won`t like the price, but you`ll LOVE the product.
redvetracr


J-56 pistons..........
 
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