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DC PIT CREW BOSS
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I prefer Zaino. Clay bar first. Goes on easy and produces a fantastic shine

Zaino Brothers site
 

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DC Crew
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Roger's Corvette Center in Orlando uses Liquid Glass on their cars. I learned this when I bought my GS from them. If it means anything, the GS looked AMAZING.:thumbsup:
 

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cuvette said:
do somebody have use LIQUID GLASS on is vette and that wax is good ????

thanks CUVETTE
As long as you use a non-abrasive 100% carnuba wax the vendor (assuming they have been in business awhile) is a matter of personal preference.

Keep in mind that wax is a protectant. It does nothing to increase the shine of the surface. In fact, after you apply a coat of wax the finish is slightly duller than before application. That's as it should be since the wax is filling in the microscopic depressions in the surface of the paint and altering the way light is reflected from the paint. It isn't noticably duller, you'd need electronic equipment to measure the difference, but the point is wax does not produce "shine" despite what the TV commercials say. Some waxes produce less dulling than others (they are more translucent), so a Spin Meister could make a case that this means it "produces" shine. In actuallity it is better allowing the "shine" that was present before application to be seen afterwards.

To produce "shine" you need polish. Polish and wax are two different products. Polish is an abrasive substance designed to remove minute amounts of the paint. A "cleaner wax" is wax with a small amount of polish in it. It is mildly abrasive because it is intended to remove dirt from the paint that was missed (or resisted) the washing process. Note that some people think cleaner wax is a substitute for washing.

You only need polish to remove oxidation from a painted surface. If there is no oxidation and you polish, you are simply scratching the paint unnecessarily.

A Corvette with base coat/clear-coat finish, properly cared for from the day it was delivered, needs only to be washed and waxed. It does not need to be polished, and in fact polishing a clear coat layer is counter productive. You will eventually wear off the clear coat layer or make it cloudy (making the finish look like there is still wax on it that hasn't been buffed out).

Trust me on this. Not only can I cite several books on Corvette Finish Care and Detailing that support these conclusions, but I can personally attest to ruining the finish on a Corvette I owned by polishing it.

The goal is to remove dirt and deposits from the paint with the absolute minimal amount of damage to the paint if you want to keep the car looking like the day it came off the assembly line.

BTW, in addition to protecting the paint surface from airborne chemicals, wax also provides significant protection for the paint from UV damage from sunlight. One of the reasons a waxed car needs to be re-waxed periodically is that UV radiation breaks down the wax. This is good, since the UV radiation expends its energy on destroying the wax and not the paint (remember the conservation of energy laws from college physics? They're true).

Go to Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Borders, or any other book store and look in the automotive section. You will find many books covering car finish care. Here are two older ones:

Secrets of Corvette Detailing
Michael Antonick (author of Corvette Black Book)
Motorbooks International
$14.95

Ultimate Auto Detailing
David H. Jacobs, Jr.
Motorbooks International
$17.95

Avoid circular buffers like the plague. If you must use a mechanical device to speed the job use an orbital buffer. With a circular buffer you not only create swirl marks, you can also burn (lieterally) the paint. However, the safest way to wax the car is by hand with baby diapers, plenty of them. Use one in each hand. Use one to remove the wax, the second to buff the area and remove all the wax. When one diaper gets saturated with wax, get a clean one. Do not buff with a circular motion. Buff with a front to back motion (preferable) or side to side motion. This avoids swirling. Front to back tends to follow the lines of the body.

Note that you will probably get advice that conflicts with the information in this post by almost 100%. Just keep in mind that there are subjective opinions and there is objective analysis. You need to gather information, analyze it, reach your own conclusions, then modify those conclusions based on empirical evidence and actual results.

When all else fails, consult the owner's manual.

Ray
 

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DC Crew
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But... what if I have those fine towel scratches all over the place? No "mild" polish seems to do anything for them. They really drive me crazy!
 

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Patrick96LT4 said:
But... what if I have those fine towel scratches all over the place? No "mild" polish seems to do anything for them. They really drive me crazy!
Meguir's makes a product called Show Car Glaze, formerly called Reseal Glaze #7, which fills those in but the effect does not last, even if you follow it up with a coat of wax (but it does look damned good five minutes after you're done). The problem is that it too is abrasive (it works by grinding off a little of the paint and filling in the scratches with the residue).

The California Water Blade (as you're aware) will go a long way toward preventing (or at least ameliorating) towel scratches, but once they are there, they are there. Repainting the panel is the only way to totally eliminate them and that solution has its on drawbacks (don't get me started on body shops, puh-lease, I don't need the hate mail).

If you talk to some people you will be told that a circular buffer and the finely ground horn of a Rhino will remove them. Perhaps, but more damage has been done with circular buffers than with WMD (economically speaking). Personally I have found that a trip to Lourdes has about the same impact (besides, it's on the way to Le Mans).

Ray
 
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