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I run the Corvette suspension with Koni adjustable shocks. On the track after I installed the PFADT sways, I have not seen an advantage in the class I run in.

I understand the abilty to lower the car and maintain handling. But for stock ride height cars is there an advantage.

Besides the track my car is a road warrior and I am reluctant to lower it. Looks great but, I hit enough crap at the current ride height.

:cheers:
 

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Come on Aaron give us the real scoop here...My guess would be individual control of each wheel...:huh:
 

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I run the Corvette suspension with Koni adjustable shocks. On the track after I installed the PFADT sways, I have not seen an advantage in the class I run in.

I understand the abilty to lower the car and maintain handling. But for stock ride height cars is there an advantage.

Besides the track my car is a road warrior and I am reluctant to lower it. Looks great but, I hit enough crap at the current ride height.

:cheers:
As you have learned, suspension improvements don't always immediately transfer into lap time. One of the ways that sway bars work is by controlling body roll which keeps the tires in better contact with the pavement. Another way they work is to make the car more stable in transitions like in a slalom section of an autocross. You will not have to let the car settle as much before beginning the turn in the other direction. The third way that the sways help is by tuning the balance of the car to make the most of the grip that is available. If a car tends to push in a certain turn, the rear swaybar can be stiffened to transfer some cornering grip from the rear tires to the front tires. The problem with autocross, is that the Corvettes have so much power for acceleration in 2nd gear, that a car that is neutral in a turning situation may be compromised (too stiff in the rear) in acceleration. Consequently, many Corvettes fair better in a auto-x setting with the rear swaybar set relatively soft even if the turn-in of the car is compromised a bit (meaning it pushes like a pig). The driver then compensates by carrying more speed into the turn and uses trail braking to rotate the car. The adjustability of our sways gives lots options, sometime experimentation is the only way to find what works best.

Coil overs offer many of the same benefits of sways in terms of keeping the car flatter and controlling the motion of the body. Unlike sways, the stiffer springs reduce brake dive and squat under acceleration. Those attributes help a car transition to acceleration more smoothly and provide better acceleration. The adjustable damping also gives an additional tool for tuning car balance. It is a finer tool than sway bar rate and also has more nuances in terms of initial turn in. Dampers only work when the suspension is moving.

Another thing to look at for real improvements is control arm bushings. The deflection in bushings can cause the loss of most the the static negative camber that people put in during an alignment. Basically with less deflection in control arm bushings, you get more effective negative camber when cornering. That is good because then you don't need 2.5* neg to get good cornering and your tire wear will still be reasonable on the street.

Feel free to call me anytime to discuss and car setup issues.

thanks,
Aaron
 

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Thanks Aaron, not only do you have good equipment, you also have good information.
 

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Thanks Aaron, not only do you have good equipment, you also have good information.
Yea, I love listening to Aaron explain technique, specs, etc. I can actually understand what he's saying and visualize it. I tried my best to soak up a lot of his track-side chats.

I'll tell ya I was immensely surprised by the ride quality in the DCZ (Pfadt coilovers). Weird that you could feel so much rigidity in the car (glided so well in hard turns, sudden lane changes, etc) yet have such a smooth ride. I wasn't expecting to really notice any difference until Pat got to the track... there the coil-overs proved valuable off-road too.
 
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