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I have a 2001 .Last fall I went to U.S.41 drag strip to see what it would do, and I experianced what felt like wheel hop. the first run [email protected] I was kind of dissapointed so I tried again this time I got even more hop but did a little better [email protected] I felt that something may get damaged so I just watched some badass vettes run. Just wondering if there is some kind of a trans brace to maybe help with this issue.Anyone know? I would like to go back and try again but don't want to brake my car.
 

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Quality shocks would go a long way toward eliminate wheel hop. Wheel hop will absolutely destroy your rear end. A brace well help strengthen the trans/rear end hold flex to a minimum but will not eliminate hop.

:cheers:
 

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I found that adding the Pfadt diff brace helped a lot :thumbsup: After that I added their motor mounts and haven't gotten wheel hop since.
 

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Wheel hop in the c5 can't possibly be any worse than in the GTOs. A lot of GTO guys have gone to different diameter half shafts and to a man thy say that cures their wheel hop issues. There are several venders.for the GTO that offer the different size half shafts, not certain they are available for the c5, but I imagine it'd be worth a look.
 

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Wheel hop in the c5 can't possibly be any worse than in the GTOs. A lot of GTO guys have gone to different diameter half shafts and to a man thy say that cures their wheel hop issues. There are several venders.for the GTO that offer the different size half shafts, not certain they are available for the c5, but I imagine it'd be worth a look.
That's not the issue with the C5's. Completely different suspension/tire/etc setup between the GTO's and C5's. The common solution for the C5's is Motor/Transmission/Diff mounts + better shocks and getting rid of the crappy run flats.
 

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Great advice in this thread so far. We've found that a lot of what users describe as wheel hop can actually be attributed to powertrain shake. Our C5 trans mount was designed to eliminate this shake, and has cured a lot of issues that C5 drag racers have experienced on track.

Here is a picture of the mount, and a link to our website for more product information: Pfadt Racing C5 Trans Brace

 

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I also:partyon: have the pfadt diff mount & it cured my problem. Been on for 2 years. I have since put on pfadt coil overs and in my opinion has enhanced the allover grip level. Nitto 555r are on the rear .NO HOP EVER, little tire spin out of the hole ! start with the BRACE. these things are like a model train layout. Your never done.

good luck

paul
 

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That's not the issue with the C5's. Completely different suspension/tire/etc setup between the GTO's and C5's. The common solution for the C5's is Motor/Transmission/Diff mounts + better shocks and getting rid of the crappy run flats.
GM in fact to reduce wheel hop designed a larger left halfshaft for the ZR1

Trannie/diff mounts are useless for wheelhop and I have seen several C5s with them with busted cases. :surprised

Simple the left shaft winds up like a spring, then unloads and harmonics
 

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Did you try dumping some tire pressure?
 

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GM in fact to reduce wheel hop designed a larger left halfshaft for the ZR1

Trannie/diff mounts are useless for wheelhop and I have seen several C5s with them with busted cases. :surprised

Simple the left shaft winds up like a spring, then unloads and harmonics
wow, that's all news to me. Any links to supporting info?
 

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During ZR1 development, Corvette engineers were dismayed to find that zero-to-60 performance was less than anticipated. Major increases in power, torque and traction over the Z06 were not delivering the expected reduction in acceleration times.

“The problem,” reveals Corvette engineering development manager Dave Wickman, “was power hop.” During launch, the ZR1’s rear tires were sticking and releasing in an unfavorable manner, which excited the entire drive-line into a torsional resonance.

All mechanical systems resonate at some natural frequency. Think of a plucked harp string, a ringing church bell or the rim of a martini glass stroked by a damp finger.

From the crankshaft to the rear tire patches, the ZR1’s driveline constitutes a mechanical system with a particular natural frequency.
When excited by the staccato torque/no-torque conditions that follow an abrupt first-gear clutch engagement, developmental ZR1 mules were resonating — hopping — at the driveline’s natural frequency.

The traction characteristics of the new Michelin Pilot Sport 2 radials, combined with the torque characteristics of the new LS9 supercharged V8, the suspension dynamics provided by ZR1’s softer spring rates and the damping properties of the electronically controlled magneto-rheological (MR) shock absorbers, had driven the new Corvette prodigy into an uncharted corner of the performance map. Something had to be done.

Wickman’s development team went to work. “Substantially increasing the driveline’s stiffness would shift its natural frequency away from the resonance point,” notes Wickman. “Unfortunately, greater stiffness usually means added mass, something we strive to avoid.

“The smarter solution was decoupling the left and right sides of the driveline by using half-shafts with significantly different natural frequencies.
In production, the ZR1’s left half-shaft is a 40mm (1.57-inch) solid steel rod while the right one is 33mm (1.30-inch) in diameter, yielding a 1.5 times difference in stiffness and, therefore, natural frequency.”

Programming the MR dampers was the second half of the solution. Corvette ride and handling engineer Jim Mero explains: “With the car at rest, the dampers provide essentially no damping. So we created a lift-dive algorithm (software) that would automatically configure the suspension for optimum launch traction.”

Following experimentation, the optimum arrangement turned out to be the full 100 percent of available rebound damping in front and 30 percent of maximum jounce damping at the rear.

So, when the ZR1 settles back on its haunches following an abrupt clutch engagement, the rearward pitch motion and resulting damping forces supplement the rear tires’ static load. That maximizes tire-to-road adhesion.

The icing on the cake is ZR1’s traction control system. Mike Petrucci, responsible for chassis controls development, explains: “The section of the traction control logic applicable to launching the ZR1 aggressively from rest is programmed to allow a fruitful amount of rear-wheel slip as long as the steering is pointed dead-straight ahead.

This allows owners to experience entertaining street performance. By keeping the traction control actively engaged, they should be able to come very close to the 3.4-second zero-to-60 acceleration figures we’ve measured in ZR1s under ideal circumstances.”
 

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so for those who aren't able to run asymmetrical half-shafts, it sounds from that article like driveline stiffening is the next best option.
 

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I've seen this quote posted a lot of places on the 'net, but nothing to substantiate it. I think we need to have a ZR1 owner get under there with a calipers and confirm or deny this theory.

-- EDIT --
found one post that indicated the quote was from Corvette Quarterly in 2008. However, their website appears to have **** the bed, so I couldn't verify the source.
 
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